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Found 11 results

  1. Celiac.com 06/07/2016 - The world of nutrition is currently obsessed with "super foods". Super foods are loosely defined as foods that are extremely high in nutrients – particularly antioxidants and vitamins – and which everyone is heartily advised to add to their diet. The problem with this approach is that, while focused firmly on nutrients, we are ignoring anti-nutrients! According to Wikipedia, an anti-nutrient is a compound in food that interferes with your absorption of other nutrients from a food. Most foods have varying amounts of anti-nutrients, toxins and other problematic compounds. A truly healthy diet will include weighing the good against the bad, while maintaining as much variety as possible. Once we have a clearer picture of how a food helps to support our nutrition, we can then decide how to include it in our diet and in what amount. Obviously, certain health conditions mean that certain foods are no longer healthful. For those with celiac disease, this means that grains with gluten in them are damaging to their health. It really doesn't matter how healthy wheat bran is for some – for celiacs, wheat bran is harmful. For those with allergies, you have a similar issue. Foods that may be healthy for some may not be for others. Another issue with food and health can be related to anti-nutrients. For instance, in the vegetarian world, we now hear more about phytate – often found in legumes – and how to reduce it in a plant-based diet. Salicylate is another anti-nutrient found in plant foods, and more people are finding that they need to consider this when choosing foods. Plants may also contain toxins, which are totally natural to the plant, but not good for you. Wikipedia indicates that a toxin is a substance that is directly poisonous, and capable of causing disease. For instance, some foods may contain naturally occurring cyanide compounds, or even arsenic in various forms. While we may not get enough to cause immediate problems, we certainly don't want to consume a lot of these toxins! Oxalate is another toxin present in many otherwise healthy foods. Oxalate poses many challenges for human health. It's a free radical. It promotes inflammation in your body. Because of its biochemistry, oxalate can be stored throughout your body, and can be particularly concentrated at the sites of previous injury, inflammation or surgery. Fundamentally, oxalate can be stored in tissues wherever the cells have taken it up. As a result, if you are someone who is absorbing too much oxalate from your diet, you can be contributing substantial stress to your body. Reducing the amount of oxalate in your diet cannot hurt you – you are reducing a totally non-nutritive substance for which the human body has no need and which contributes directly to health issues. However, reducing too many food types or nutrients in your diet can have negative impacts. The greater the variety in your diet, the better the chance that you are getting all your needed nutrients. The good news is that you can have a nutritious, high variety diet, and retain "super foods" in your diet which are high nutrition, gluten-free and low oxalate. Get Your Fiber The preponderance of processed foods in our diets can often leave us with hardly any fiber in our diet! Many gluten-free options are very low in fiber, and this can affect gut health. Fiber is not a direct nutrient for us per se – but it is a needed component that contributes to better gut flora and better health overall. Insoluble fiber adds bulk to the stool and promotes regularity. Most of us are not getting enough of this fiber, and as a result, can develop poor motility and constipation. Given that many whole grains are not good alternatives for those on a gluten-free diet, and the bran of many grains are actually high in oxalate, how can we get more healthy insoluble fiber? The good news is that one nutritional powerhouse is not only full of healthy insoluble fiber – it's also a plant source of Omega 3's. So a great solution to lack of insoluble fiber is flax seeds. Flax seeds can be eaten whole – but to really get the best benefits from this super food, it's best to grind your flax. Keep whole flax seeds in the freezer to preserve their freshness, and don't grind until just before using them. The recommended daily serving (which will also provide some soluble fiber) is two tablespoons. According to the Mayo Clinic, the right fiber goes much further than just regularity. If you increase soluble fiber, it can help reduce both blood sugar and cholesterol. Soluble fiber creates a gel-like material in the gut, and some research indicates that it may help to feed our gut bacteria. The benefits of soluble fiber are well known when it comes to cholesterol. The recommended food to get more soluble fiber is oats. However, whole oats are high in oxalate, and the oat bran has confusing test data. The solution? Psyllium! Pysllium is the medicinal ingredient in the popular product, Metamucil. Psyllium contains both soluble and insoluble fiber – and research on it shows that it can help to reduce cholesterol as well as normalize blood sugar. You can add it to baked products (but adjust the liquids), or sprinkle on foods. It's virtually tasteless – although you might find it does add some thickness or texture to liquids or foods. Fruits and vegetables are also good sources of both soluble and insoluble fiber and many are lower oxalate. Cabbages, lettuces, onions, cucumbers (with the skin) red bell peppers, orange, mango and grapes are all good low oxalate sources of fiber in your diet. Fruits There is no shortage of healthy options in fresh fruits that are also low oxalate, but the blueberry holds a special place among even the healthiest fruits. Research shows that blueberries are one of the most antioxidant rich foods available, and are included in most lists of super foods. Blueberries are one of the highest rated foods on the ORAC scale. The ORAC scale was developed by researchers at Tufts University, and is the measure of Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity (hence the abbreviation ORAC). What this really means for you is that the higher something ranks on the ORAC scale, the more antioxidants you are getting. Blueberries are stars on this scale, with an ORAC value of 4,669 per 100 grams, according to Superfoodly.com. Wild blueberries rank higher than cultivated ones – but you can't go wrong with any blueberry. Another fruit that ranks very high in ORAC is the lowly cranberry. While very tart (and difficult to eat raw), cranberries are second only to blueberries in antioxidant levels. To reduce the acidity of the fruit, and make them more palatable, cook with water and some honey. Cranberries are very easy to cook and make a lovely side dish for fattier meats like lamb. They aren't just for turkey anymore! Consuming these tangy fruits also help to contribute to bladder health. For nutrition on the go, turn to golden seedless raisins. While dark raisins are tasty treats, the golden seedless variety is both lower in oxalate and higher in antioxidants. In fact, golden seedless raisins actually have a higher ORAC score than fresh blueberries! Combine that with convenience and portability, and you have an easy way to get more antioxidants in your day. Raisins also make a great treat for kids, because of their sweetness. Is the apple a super food? Yes it is! Easy to purchase and pack for lunch, this popular fruit is full of quercetin, which protects cells from damage and is often recommended for those with allergies. Not only is it full of healthy antioxidants, it also has twice the fiber of other commonly eaten fruits, including peaches, grapes and grapefruit, according to the site EverydayHealth.com. Veggies When looking at veggies, many of the foods that are considered most healthy are also very high in oxalate. Everyone talks today about how healthy the sweet potato is for us: but did you know that a ½ cup of sweet potato can have over 90 mg of oxalate in it? For people trying to eat a low oxalate diet, a single serving would be more oxalate than they should consume in a whole day! However, while avoiding high oxalate foods, you do need to eat color and variety to get your needed nutrition. If you want a lower carbohydrate, orange veggie – consider the kabocha squash. Not only does this lower carb, low oxalate veggie work as a substitute for many recipes that require sweet potato, it also has a very good nutrient profile. Self Nutrition Data lists Vitamin A and Vitamin C as well as a good serving of Folate, in addition to good amounts of calcium, magnesium, phosphorus and potassium. Of course, you want other colors in your veggies as well – and green leafy veggies are particularly known for their nutrition. While spinach would be a bad choice because of extremely high oxalate, you have lots of other greens to choose from. Focus on lower oxalate varieties of kale, including purple kale. The website, The World's Healthiest Foods, lists kale as a food that can lower cholesterol (if steamed) as well as lower your risk of cancer. Of course, kale is part of the cruciferous vegetable family, and these foods have many anti-cancer benefits. Kale is an excellent source of Vitamin K (your blood clotting factor), as well as vitamin A, vitamin C, manganese, copper, B6 and others. Don't forget your other brassicas while you are focusing on kale! The cruciferous veggies also support our bodies natural detox processes, which is very valuable in today's world where we are exposed to many environmental toxins. Broccoli is another low oxalate brassica that is good for you, whether you are eating the mature broccoli heads, or feasting on broccoli sprouts. Note that broccoli sprouts do have an edge over their more mature cousins – they might just taste better, and given that they can be added to a sandwich for some satisfying crunch, might be easier to work into your daily diet. Research gives the sprouts a further edge in cancer risk reduction and some research indicates they may actually help to prevent stomach cancer. Another excellent leafy green is the lowly turnip green. Turnip greens are very high in calcium, and are even lower in oxalate than kale. A cup of cooked turnip greens will also get you more than 100% of the RDA for vitamin K. In addition, you'll get vitamin A, vitamin C, folate, copper, manganese, calcium, and vitamin E. Each serving will give you 15% of your daily requirement for B6. When thinking of deep red veggies, go for red cabbage. This versatile veggie is very low in oxalate, and that lovely red color means that it has even more protective phytonutrients, according to World's Healthiest Foods, than its green sibling! One serving of red cabbage delivers more than four times the polyphenols of green cabbage. Fats and Oils You can't read on super food nutrition anywhere and not run into the avocado. A great source of healthy monounsaturated fat, the avocado has also been linked to reduced risk of cancer, as well as lowered risk of heart disease and diabetes. While we think of avocados as a fatty food, they are actually a good source of fiber, with 11 to 17 grams of fiber per fruit! You'll also get a dose of lutein, an antioxidant recommended for eye health. Web MD says that lutein is a potent antioxidant, which is found in high concentrations in the eye. The combination of lutein and zeaxanthin (another antixodant) help to protect your eyes from damaging, high energy light. Some research indicates that a diet high in lutein and zeaxanthin may reduce the risk of cataracts by as much as 50%. Coconut oil is another excellent fat that can benefit our bodies in a host of ways. Doctor Oz lists a number of benefits, including supporting thyroid health and blood sugar control. This may be related to the form of saturated fat that is found in coconut oil, called lauric acid. Lauric acid is a medium-chain triglyceride. This kind of fat actually boosts immune system, and has antibiotic, antiviral and antifungal properties. It may also be a tool in your weight loss arsenal. A study in 2009 actually showed the eating 2 Tablespoons of coconut oil daily, allowed subjects to lose belly fat more effectively. Even better news for those who are following a low oxalate diet: both avocado and coconut oil have zero oxalate! Nuts, Seeds and Legumes Unfortunately, many foods in this category are high oxalate – and so won't qualify for our super food list. While you might be able to have a couple of walnut halves, or a similar amount of pecans, nuts are generally just to high to have in servings of more than 3-5 pieces. However, if you are looking for a superfood in this category, look no further than pumpkin seeds! Pumpkin seeds are an excellent source of vegetable-based protein, and are another portable food. A great snack for the health conscious can be made with raisins and pumpkin seeds – both are low oxalate, and the protein of the pumpkin seeds will help you to stay fuller longer. According to LiveStrong.com, a handful of pumpkin seeds will give you over 8 grams of protein. At the same time, pumpkin seeds are low in sugar, and provide you with fiber as part of the carbohydrate in them. You will also get vitamin A, vitamin B, vitamin K, thiamine, riboflavin, niacin, magnesium, calcium, iron, manganese, zinc, potassium, copper and phosphorus in that small and compact package! If pumpkin seeds don't qualify as a super food, it's hard to say what would! When it comes to legumes, many are stars for protein, but one of the best options is the red lentil. Lentils in general are easier to prepare than other types of legumes – they do not require the soaking and preparation time that many legumes do. At the same time, they are powerhouses of nutrition, with molybdenum, folate, fiber, copper, phosphorus and manganese all at more than 50% of your daily requirement. One cup of cooked lentils will also give you 36 % of your daily need for protein, according to World's Healthiest Foods. And all this nutrition is provided in a food that is virtually fat free and low in calories. You cannot go wrong! As an added benefit, some studies have found that eating high fiber foods like red lentils may reduce the risk of heart disease. The more fiber, the lower the risk of heart disease. Fish We are always hearing that we need to have more fish in our diets. It seems sometimes that not a week goes by when we are not hearing that we should be eating less meat, and getting less fat – with the suggestion that more fish would benefit us. When you think of the super food of fish, you have to think of salmon. Salmon is a fatty fish, and it's one of the best sources available for omega-3 fatty acids. In today's world of processed foods, omega-3's are one of the nutrients that we don't get enough of. Your best bet with salmon is to get wild-caught fish. Farmed salmon do not have the same nutrient profile, which may be related to the kind of food they are fed. Along with the decreased nutrient profile, studies have indicated that farmed salmon contains significantly higher concentrations of a number of contaminants (including PCBs, dieldrins, toxaphenes, dioxins and chlorinated pesticides) than wild caught salmon. World's Healthiest Foods states that a 4 ounce piece of Coho salmon will get you 55% of your daily requirements for omega-3 fats. On top of that, you'll get more than 50% of your daily requirement for vitamin B12, vitamin D, selenium, vitamin B3, protein and phosphorus, as well as other B vitamins and minerals. Omega-3 fatty acids will provide you a host of benefits, from reduction of inflammation, to better brain function. Omega-3 fat is also heart healthy, and can contribute to a reduced risk of heart attack, stroke, high blood pressure and other cardiovascular disease. Research indicates that eating salmon at least 2 to 3 times a week will give you the best benefits. Spice it up Spices can be a bit tricky, if you want to keep your oxalate low. Many spices – while tasty – are very high in oxalate! A great example of this is turmeric. A staple in most curry recipes, turmeric is extremely high oxalate – so while it has a reputation as a super food, it would not be a good choice if you are trying to keep your oxalate low. So what is your option if you love to eat foods spiced with turmeric? Well, the easiest approach is to stock your spice rack with a health food store supplement; cook with curcumin extract! While it may seem a bit odd at first, if you buy a curcumin extract (which is the extract from turmeric), you can get the flavor and leave the oxalate behind. While not technically a "food" when you cook with a supplement, you certainly get all the benefits of the original super food – turmeric – without the downside of oxalate. Another highly beneficial spice is cinnamon. Research clearly shows how helpful cinnamon is for managing blood sugar. However, ground cinnamon is an extremely high oxalate spice. So how can you get the flavor you want, while avoiding the oxalate? One solution is to cook with a cinnamon extract that you buy at the health food store! One brand known to be low oxalate is Doctor's Best. It is a dry extract in capsules – simply break open the capsules and use the contents in your dish. This allows you to get all the therapeutic benefits of the extract as well as the taste. You can also cook with essential oils and culinary oils – but use them carefully. Essential oils can be very strong and can irritate the tissues of the mouth and digestive tract. One drop of good quality essential cinnamon oil will replace as much as 1 tablespoon of ground cinnamon. Culinary oils are made for flavoring – follow the directions on the product that you buy. Either way, you will get the taste – and you avoid the oxalate. Enjoying Your Food! As with anyone who wants to eat a healthy diet full of super foods, the trick is to focus on the best nutrition, and get lots of variety. While some foods may not be as "super" as others, if you are making colorful meals, with healthful selections from across the spectrum, you'll be doing your body a favor with flavor! Where Does Oxalate Go? Once you have eaten oxalate, you have to excrete it through urine, feces or sweat. But what happens if you don't? A study on rats was able to trace where in the body a dose of oxalate remained. The scientists used a special carbon molecule – carbon 14 – in the oxalate they gave to the rats, so that they could find the oxalate wherever it went in the body. What they found is that if the oxalate was not excreted from the body, it was stored everywhere: 68% in the bones 9% in the spleen 8% in the adrenal glands 3% in the kidneys 3% in the liver 8% in the rest of the body These results are in direct opposition to conventional medical thinking, that oxalate only affects the kidneys. It clearly shows us that the whole body – but particularly the bones, key glands and detoxification organs – are all affected. This is another good reason to reduce the amount of oxalate in your diet! Is Spinach Really That Bad For You? A relatively simple study in the late 1930's looked at rats fed a diet that was only adequate in calcium. To bring the levels of calcium up, the rats were given spinach, equaling about 8% of their diet. While most of us think of spinach in terms of iron, it is also relatively high in calcium. The results of the study were shocking: 47. A high percentage of rats died between the age of 21 days and 90 days 48. The bones of the rats were extremely low in calcium (despite adding it to the diet through the spinach) 49. Tooth structure was poor and dentine of the teeth poorly calcified 50. For these animals, reproduction was impossible. Researchers concluded that not only did spinach not supply the needed calcium (because of the oxalate), but the spinach also rendered the calcium from other foods unavailable. What we know now is that oxalate is a mineral chelator – and rather than delivering minerals, it was robbing them from the rats. Getting Your Vitamin K Vitamin K is a very important nutrient. Life Extension indicates that new research from 2014 links vitamin K to longevity. In fact, the highest intakes of vitamin K reduced the likelihood of dying from any cause by 36%! So, you definitely want to get vitamin K in your diet. However, most of us think that we need to eat high oxalate greens – like spinach – in order to get good amounts of vitamin K. Nothing could be further from the truth! Kale, collards and turnip greens are all higher in vitamin K than spinach, and they have a fraction of the oxalate.
  2. Celiac.com 01/07/2014 - Anyone who ate aluminium-trayed tv dinners or school lunches in a certain era, likely knows, and possibly loves, Salisbury steak. Others may know its microwaveable descendants from the supermarket frozen aisle. Either way, Salisbury steak is one of those foods that evokes strong memories, and this simple, easy-to-make recipe delivers a tasty, gluten-free version of that old favorite. Ingredients: 1½ pounds ground beef ½ cup crushed Rice Chex or gluten-free bread crumbs 5 tablespoons gluten-free instant onion soup mix 1 cup water ¼ cup red wine 1 egg 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce ½ teaspoon mustard powder ¼ teaspoon salt â…› teaspoon ground black pepper 1 tablespoon potato flour ¼ cup ketchup Directions: In a large bowl, mix together ⅓ of the dry onion soup with ground beef, Rice Chex, egg, salt and black pepper. Shape into 6 oval patties. In a large skillet over medium-high heat, brown both sides of patties. Pour off excess fat. In a small bowl, blend water, potato flour and remaining dry soup until smooth. Mix in ketchup, red wine, Worcestershire sauce and mustard powder. Pour over meat in skillet. Cover, and cook, stirring occasionally, for about 20 minutes, until sauce reduces and thickens. If necessary thicken with more potato flour, or thin with water. Serve with rice or mashed potatoes and a side vegetable for a full helping of gluten-free comfort food.
  3. Celiac.com 06/28/2016 - My latest obsession is creating new quinoa recipes, since my eight year old daughter absolutely loves it! Her favorite is warm quinoa with crumbled turkey sausage, broccoli, and lots of cumin. She also loves it with oil and balsamic vinegar. I like it cold with chopped veggies, garlic, and fresh squeezed lemon juice. Just a few weeks ago I tried amaranth for the first time. It seems to be the new craze these days. It cooked up very similarly to quinoa, and had a similar taste and texture. I would say the only noticeable difference is that amaranth does not get as fluffy when cooked. It seems like it would be great in soup! Now for a little history. Amaranth is estimated to have been domesticated between 6,000 and 8,000 years ago, and was a staple food crop of the Aztec's. The common name, amaranth, represents over sixty different plant species called amaranthus.(1) The amaranth plant is a full, broad leafed plant that has vibrant colors. Amaranth's name comes from the Greek name, amarantos, meaning "one that does not fade." This is due to the plant retaining its vibrant colors even after harvesting and drying. The amaranth plant can contain up to 60,000 seeds. Amaranth is gluten-free and it contains about thirty percent more protein than rice, sorghum, and rye.(2) Amaranth flour can be made from the seeds and is a excellent replacement for those suffering from celiac disease or gluten sensitivity. Amaranth flour has a unique chemical composition with a predominance of albumins and globulins and a very small prolamins content with total absence of alpha-gliadin. This makes it very comparable to wheat protein(2). It also has a relatively high content of calcium, iron, potassium, magnesium, and fiber and an almost perfect amino acid profile. It's particularly high in lysine, which is abundantly lacking in wheat and corn.(3) Another benefit of amaranth is that it is a natural source of folic acid, and in some countries, amaranth is used alleviate birth defects. Amaranth is not a true grain, as it does not come from the Poaceae family, but is considered a pseudo-cereal like it's relative quinoa. Both amaranth and quinoa belong to a large family that also includes beets, chard and spinach.(3) Quinoa is a broad-leafed plant that produces a small seed. It's a member of the Goosefoot family that is native to South America.(4) Quinoa is considered a complete protein that contains all nine of the essential amino acids necessary to human physiology, and it is the only plant-based source for these nutrients.(5) Quinoa cooks up like a grain, but it is actually a seed, and is an excellent source of protein for vegans and people following a gluten-free diet. According to the American Journal of Gastroenterology, it is also safe for celiac patients.(6) Like amaranth, quinoa can be ground into a flour and used in cooking or baking. Quinoa is rich in manganese which is vital to activating enzymes crucial to metabolizing carbohydrates and cholesterol. It is also essential to bone development. Quinoa is rich in lysine, an essential amino acid, and helps with the absorption of calcium and the production of collagen and is low on the glycemic index.(5) Both amaranth and quinoa are great gluten-free options, both as a flour or grain substitute, and have a nutty taste and texture. They readily absorb the flavors they are cooked with, but are also tasty on their own. They can be made hot or cold, combined with other foods, added to soups or baked goods, and made into hot porridge or cereal. They are both versatile, easy to work with, and have a high nutritional content. If you're looking for an easy, healthy, gluten-free option, why not try amaranth or quinoa? It's a staple in our home! References: www.wholegrainscouncil.org Vopr Pitan. 2014;83(1):67-73., Amaranth flour: characteristics, comparative analysis, application possibilities. Howard, B. C. (August 12, 2013), Amaranth, Another Ancient Wonder Food, But Who Will Eat It?, Retrieved from www.nationalgeographic.com. Laux, M. (June 2012). Iowa State University. Agricultural Marketing Resource Center. Retrieved from www.agmrc.org. Norek, Danna. (June 15, 2010), Quinoa Gives the Perfect Protein Source to Vegetarians and Vegans. Retrieved from www.naturalnews.com. Victor F Zevallos PhD1, L Irene Herencia PhD2, Fuju Chang MD, PhD3, Suzanne Donnelly PhD1, H Julia Ellis PhD1 and Paul J Ciclitira MD, PhD1 (January 21, 2-14). Gastrointestinal Effects of Eating Quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) in Celiac Patients. Am J Gastroenterol 2014; 109:270–278.
  4. Celiac.com 01/23/2015 - This Superbowl Sunday gluten-free fans can celebrate with gluten-free Pizza Hut pizza, and, in a few lucky test markets, gluten-free Coors beer. You read right. First, Pizza Hut has announced that, starting Jan. 26, it will be debuting a gluten-free pizza in about 2,400 locations in the U.S. The new pizza will be a 10-inch, six-slice pizza, which will go for $9.99. The pizza crust will be made by popular gluten-free brand Udi’s Foods, and certified gluten-free by the Gluten Intolerance Group. Pizza Hut’s gluten-free pie will be one of the restaurant’s lowest-calorie pizzas, with about 100 fewer calories per serving than their current “Skinny Slice” pizza. Every Pizza Hut Gluten-Free Pizza will be baked fresh-to-order on parchment paper and delivered in a specially branded Udi’s Gluten-Free Pizza box. Also, all employees handling Pizza Hut’s Gluten-Free Pizza have been trained to wear gloves and use a designated gluten-free pizza cutter. If that’s not enough good news, beer-loving gluten-free football fans in Seattle and Portland will be able to chase their gluten-free Pizza Hut pizzas with Coors’ new gluten-free Peak Copper Lager, which will debut in those markets on Superbowl Sunday. Coors will gauge the response in its test markets as it looks to make Peak Copper Lager available in more U.S. markets. Gluten-free Pizza Hut pizza and gluten-free Coors beer on Superbowl Sunday? I’m going to call that a touchdown. Read more in USA Today, and Money.
  5. Celiac.com 02/24/2015 - I've posted recipes for chicken and beef broth lately, and now it's time for what may be the healthiest of all broths, fish broth. Naturally gluten-free fish broth offers a delicious way to promote gut health, and recovery from illness. Ideally, fish broth is made from the bones of sole or turbot. Unfortunately, it's hard to get whole sole fish in America. However, you can make a great broth using any non-oily fish, such as snapper, rock fish, or lingcod. Ask your fish merchant to save the carcasses for you. Avoid using oily fish such as salmon for making broth, mainly because oily fish will make the broth turn rancid during the long cooking process. Be sure to use the heads as well as the bodies, as the heads are especially rich in iodine and fat-soluble vitamins. Use the broth any time you make seafood-based stews, soups, or chowders. Ingredients: 3 or 5 whole carcasses, including heads, of non-oily fish such as sole, turbot, rockfish or snapper about 3 quarts cold filtered water 2 or 3 sprigs fresh thyme 2 or 3 sprigs parsley 2 onions, coarsely chopped ¼ cup dry sake, white wine or vermouth ⅓ cup vinegar Sea salt to taste Directions: Melt butter in a large stainless steel pot. Add the vegetables and cook very gently, about 30 minutes, until they are soft. Add wine and bring to a boil. Add the fish carcasses and cover with cold, filtered water. Add vinegar. Bring to a boil and skim off the scum and impurities as they rise to the top. Tie herbs together and add to the pot. Reduce heat, cover and simmer for at least 4 hours or as long as 24 hours. I usually cook it for about 12-24 hours. Remove carcasses with tongs or a slotted spoon and strain the liquid into pint-sized storage containers for refrigerator or freezer. Chill well in the refrigerator and remove any congealed fat before transferring to the freezer for long-term storage.
  6. Celiac.com 01/06/2015 - This recipe makes a tasty, festive multi-layer bean dip that will have your guests smiling and asking for more. The recipe is pretty flexible, so feel free to adjust ingredients to suit your tastes and desires. Ingredients: 2½ cans refried beans 3 medium ripe avocados, peeled ½ cup of tomato salsa of choice 2 tablespoons lemon juice ½ teaspoon salt ¼ teaspoon pepper 1 cup (8 ounces) gluten-free sour cream 2 tablespoons mayonnaise 2 tablespoons gluten-free taco seasoning (see recipe below) 1½ cups (6 ounces) shredded cheddar cheese 1 cup sliced black olives, drained 4 green onions, thinly sliced 1 large tomato, chopped w/ seeds removed Tortilla chips Directions: Mix salsa into bean dip and spread over a large serving plate. Combine the sour cream, mayonnaise and taco seasoning; spread over the bean layer. In a small bowl, mash avocados with lemon juice, salt and pepper; spread over sour cream layer. Sprinkle with cheese, and top with olives, onions and tomato. Serve with tortilla chips. Gluten-Free Taco Seasoning Ingredients: 2 tablespoons ground chili powder 3 teaspoons ground cumin 2 teaspoons salt 2 teaspoons ground black pepper 1 teaspoon ground paprika ½ teaspoon dried oregano ½ teaspoon garlic powder ½ teaspoon onion powder ½ teaspoon dried red pepper flakes Directions: Mix ingredients in a bowl and place in a jar to use as needed.
  7. Celiac.com 05/13/2014 - The middle of winter often finds me craving salad, and this wonderful citrus apple salad uses the fruits of winter to deliver the freshness of summer. Ingredients: 6 cups baby arugula 4 small oranges, de-seeded 4 blood oranges, de-seeded 1 green apple, thinly sliced 1 red apple, thinly sliced ½ cup pomegranate seeds 3 tablespoons freshly squeezed orange juice 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice ¼ teaspoon coarse salt â…› teaspoon freshly ground black pepper, divided ½ cup crumbled feta or blue cheese Directions: Peel and section all oranges. Reserve juice, and squeeze more for the dressing if needed. Discard any seeds. Grate rind from one orange into a small bowl and set aside. In a medium bowl, whisk together three tablespoons orange juice, olive oil, lemon juice, salt and pepper with orange rind. In a separate, larger bowl, combine arugula, orange sections and apple pieces. Top salad with dressing and toss gently. Top with pomegranate seeds. Spoon onto individual serving plates and sprinkle with feta.
  8. Celiac.com 04/04/2014 - Many people looking for gluten-free grains that pack a big punch turn to ancient grains like quinoa, sorghum, and millet. Now, more and more people are expanding that list to include teff, the ancient grain that is a staple in the Ethiopian culture. In fact, in some circles, teff is being called the next rival to quinoa. That may be due in part to the Ethiopian government's campaign to promote teff to western markets. The main selling points are that teff is gluten-free and nutritious, rich in amino acids, protein, iron and calcium. Teff also makes a good substitute for wheat flour in many recipes. These facts, along with plans by the Ethiopian government to double the production of teff by next year could help feed the growing global demand for gluten-free grains. I've known about teff since around the turn of the century. There was, and I think still is, a great little Ethiopian restaurant in town that, with a few days advance notice, would make injera, the spongy traditional bread using pure teff and no wheat. Their food was delicious, and I've remembered teff fondly ever since then. Source: WIKIPEDIA
  9. In my house, summertime means fresh vegetables and great salads. Salads are a quick and easy way to add splash to just about any meal, and to add extra nutrients to your diet. They are packed with fiber, vitamins and minerals, and can brighten your palate, along with your meal. Here's an easy recipe for one of my favorite, delicious summertime salads. It is quick, easy and very flexible. It can be made as is, or adapted to your favorite vegetables, or to what you have on hand. However you make it, it's sure to help keep you and your guests happy and healthy and smiling all summer long. Ingredients: Red leaf or green leaf lettuce Heirloom tomato wedges Organic carrot, shredded Red bell peppers, sliced thin Avocado, peeled and sliced Sunflower seeds, roasted Cucumber, peeled and sliced Cilantro, in small sprigs (as desired) Directions: Rinse lettuce and pat dry with a paper towel or spin it in a salad spinner. Tear lettuce into pieces of desired size and toss into a large salad bowl or individual serving bowls. Place desired quantities of other fresh ingredients into the bowl(s). Top with sunflower seeds. I've found that adding some cilantro sprigs to my salad really makes it pop with flavor. If you don't like cilantro, feel free to skip it. In fact, you can feel free to add and subtract any ingredients at will. Add your favorites, or skip what you don't like. This particular salad offers numerous variations, all delicious. Serve with honey-mustard dressing on the side. Honey-Mustard Vinaigrette Salad Dressing Ingredients: 1 cup olive oil 1 clove garlic, peeled & sliced in half 1 tablespoon dijon mustard 1 tablespoon honey 3 tablespoons white wine vinegar salt pepper Directions: Rub the sides of a bowl with garlic, then discard. In the bowl whisk together mustard, honey and vinegar. Slowly whisk in the olive oil. Season with salt and pepper. Scale recipe as needed.
  10. This article originally appeared in the Summer 2004 edition of Celiac.coms Scott-Free Newsletter. Celiac.com 10/27/2004 - I recently decided to have my DNA and that of my son screened for the genetic markers, also known as HLA alleles, which make celiac disease possible. Both my mother and I have long since been diagnosed with the disease, so I naturally worry that my son Spencer may also end up with it at some point in his life. Even though he has been mostly symptom-free for his entire life—all three and a half years of it—last year I subjected him to serological screening after he had a several week bout with diarrhea. We were happy to discover that he did not have it, but I still knew that such tests could not rule the disease out of his future. Even so, it was nice to learn that he did not have the active disease, although a blood draw at two years of age was not exactly a pleasant experience for him—or for his parents! I swore then that I would try to avoid any unnecessary blood draws in the future, even though I knew that it might still be necessary from time to time—unless he somehow did not inherit the genetic markers for it—the idea of which led me to my decision to have Spencers DNA screened for celiac disease. After mentioning my plans for the DNA screening at a family dinner, my brother also grew interested, as he too has had unexplained symptoms and a recent negative celiac disease antibody panel and biopsy. He too felt that it would be nice to find out once and for all if this was something that he was going to have to worry about in the future. He also pointed out to me that genetic screening had the potential to save him money over the long haul, since the test is only necessary once in a lifetime. Periodic antibody screening for the disease can prove to be quite expensive, and a negative DNA test would effectively rule out the necessity of any future testing. After we finished our dinner that evening I sat down with my brother and we reviewed several offerings on the Internet by companies who provide genetic services for celiac disease, and were particularly impressed by one of them—Kimball Genetics, located in Denver, Colorado, as their DNA collection method did not require a blood draw and instead employed a simple and painless cheek cell collection using a swab. The next day I telephoned Kimball Genetics and was connected with a very knowledgeable genetic counselor. After a discussion with her about my familys history I decided to order three celiac disease genetic tests, one each for my son, my brother, and myself. I requested three cheek cell collection kits to be sent to my home, where the samples would be collected and sent back to Kimball Genetics for testing. For individuals the cost of a kit is 10% off of $325, or $292.50 per test, and they offer a 20% family discount for testing additional family members, which brings the per test price down to $260. Kimball Genetics also offers assistance with billing your health insurance company, which can often result in the recovery of all or part of the costs incurred for the tests. This includes detailed help with the forms, insurance CPT codes for the procedure, as well as obtaining the ICD9 codes, which are the diagnostic and symptom codes that come from your doctor. At this point I realized that to get reimbursed for the tests a person should first make an appointment with their doctor, and ideally this appointment should take place before actually ordering a test kit. This will ensure that you and your doctor are on the same page regarding the importance and necessity of the genetic tests. The cheek cell collection kits arrived in the mail within a couple of days, and I phoned my brother to arrange a "DNA collection party" at my house. On collection day we opened the kits to find enclosed two brushes for sample collection, a Test Request Form, a consent form, medical literature regarding Kimball Genetics DNA screening test for celiac disease, and detailed instructions that outlined how to properly collect and mail the samples. The kits also included a stamped return envelope that was pre-addressed to their laboratory. The Test Request Form included an area where one could enter their credit card information, and this form along with the consent form and a check or card information were required to be sent along with the sample in the return envelope. The medical literature included with the kits comprised of a three page document titled "Celiac Disease DNA Test." The following two sections, which I found to be particularly helpful, are reproduced below from this document, which is also available on their Web site www.kimballgenetics.com: Indications for Celiac Disease DNA Testing: Clinical diagnosis of celiac disease. Negative or equivocal antibody results (antiendomysial, tissue transglutaminase, or antigliadin) or intestinal biopsy results in an individual with symptoms of celiac disease. Relatives of individuals with celiac disease. Individuals with iron-deficient anemia. Individuals with dermatitis herpetiformis. Adults with diarrhea, abdominal pain and distention, recurrent aphthous stomatitis (canker sores), osteoporosis, infertility, multiple miscarriages, anxiety, and/or depression. Children with abdominal pain, diarrhea, abdominal distention, failure to thrive, short stature, delayed puberty, irritability, attention-deficit disorder and/or poor school performance. Children with Type I diabetes. Our Celiac Disease DNA Test Service Provides: PCR analysis for DQ2 alleles (DQA1*0501, DQA1*0505, and DQB1*0201/*0202) and DQ8 allele (DQB1*0302). Detailed reports with genetic interpretation, recommendations, and education. Free genetic counseling for physicians, patients, and families. Free shipping. The sample collection went very smoothly for each of us, and Spencer found it to be slightly more annoying than having to brush his teeth. We each rinsed our mouths out with water beforehand, and then rolled one brush at a time 20 times over the entire inside surface area of one check, and then did the same on the other cheek with the second brush. We let the samples dry for 30 minutes, and then put everything in their respective packages and envelopes along with the filled out paper work. Our final step was to put them out for the Mail Carrier to pick up. Their literature promised a 3-4 day turn around, and sure enough, both my brother and I got a call from someone at Kimball Genetics several days later who needed our doctors fax numbers, which we had forgotten to include on the paperwork. Once they had this information, a call to our doctors was all that was necessary to have our doctors forward the results directly to us by fax, and we also received the original reports by mail. Amazingly the Celiac Disease DNA Test at Kimball Genetics takes just one business day from the day the lab receives the sample (if it arrives by noon) to reporting of results. I have to admit that besides hoping that my son did not inherit the genetic makeup that makes celiac disease possible—as the results were printing out from my fax machine—I still held out the very slight hope that they had not found the markers in my genetic sample, and that my whole diagnosis was some sort of big mistake. This hope was quickly crushed as the report indicated that I was in fact part of an elite genetic group—one that carries both markers for celiac disease: DQ2 and DQ8—which I later discovered meant that I inherited genetic traits for celiac disease from both of my parents, rather than just from my mother, which was my original assumption. My father is no longer alive, but after discussing his results with my mother we decided that it is possible that he also had undiagnosed celiac disease, and it is interesting to note that he had diabetes. I couldnt help but think that my results make me something like a "Super Celiac," although the genetic counselor at Kimball Genetics reassured me that having both markers for it doesnt necessarily mean that the disease will present itself any differently. Spencer turned out to be positive for DQ2, and my brother found out that he too tested positive for both DQ2 and DQ8. On the down side their results indicate that they will need to watch out for any future signs of the disease for the rest of their lives, and probably get screened for it from time to time. On the up side there is still only a small chance that either will ever develop the disease, and at least we will know to watch for its symptoms in the future, which likely would lead to a quick diagnosis and treatment should one of them ever get it. Ultimately anyone who decides to undergo genetic screening must be comfortable with the results—positive or negative. I advocate testing because I believe in the saying that knowledge is power, and that it is better to know than not to know—especially when it comes to your health. Unlike other testing methods, genetic screening for celiac disease has the amazing potential to reveal whether someone has been misdiagnosed with the disease, even though the odds for such a scenario are small. It also can confirm a diagnosis, or let relatives of celiacs know that they do or dont need to worry about it in the future. My mother felt vindicated by our results, as they indicated that she wasnt the only person who passed celiac genes to her children—my father did too. Who knows, your genetic results may even have the potential to elevate your celiac status, as it did in my case, to that of—Super Celiac!
  11. This recipe comes to us from Ann Sokolowski. Preheat oven to 350 and grease a jelly roll pan or cookie sheet with lip on all sides. 1 package gluten-free cake mix [more about flavors below] 5 eggs ¾ cup oil [or melted and cooled butter] 2 tablespoons gluten-free extracts 2 cup toasted nuts [optional] 1 cup dried fruits [optional] Combine all ingredients. Pour into jelly roll pan and cake for 20 to 30 min until tests done. Remove from oven, but keep oven on slice cookies into thirds [the long way] and across in ½ inch slices. Remove half and spread out on another jelly roll pan [un-greased] and put back in oven for 3 to 10 min, until golden. Cool and store in air-right container. Flavorings (choose one): 2 tablespoons anise extract with yellow cake batter ½ teas ground cloves, 1 tablespoons instant espresso powder, 2 tablespoons almond extract with chocolate cake mix 2 teas ground ginger, ½ cup finely chopped candied ginger with yellow cake mix
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