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Found 5 results

  1. Celiac.com 12/06/2018 - The growing popularity of gluten-free foods has led to numerous new products for consumers, but it has also led to some problems. One recent study showed that up to one-third of foods sold as gluten-free contain gluten above 20ppm allowed by federal law. Other studies have shown that restaurant food labeled as “gluten-free” is often contaminated with gluten. The problem of gluten in commercial food labeled gluten-free is not isolated to the United States. Recent studies abroad show that the problem exists in nearly every gluten-free market in every country. In Australia, for example, researchers from the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute in Melbourne found detectable gluten in almost 3% of 256 commonly purchased “gluten-free” manufactured foods, a study published in the Medical Journal of Australia on Monday says. Furthermore, the study shows that nearly 10% of restaurant dishes sold as "gluten-free" contain unacceptable levels of gluten. Now, the Australians have a stricter standard than nearly anyone else, so look for them to be on top of potential problems with gluten contamination in gluten-free products. The study did not name the food manufacturers responsible for the contaminated products, but did note that better, more frequent gluten testing by manufacturers would make gluten-free foods safer for people with celiac disease. In a related study, the same researchers found in May that nearly one in ten samples of “gluten-free” dishes from restaurants within the City of Melbourne contained gluten levels in excess of the official Food Standards Australia New Zealand definition of gluten-free. “It’s troubling to think that these foods could be hindering the careful efforts of patients trying their best to avoid gluten,” an author of the study, Dr Jason Tye-Din, said. A spokeswoman from Coeliac Australia said the organization was taking the findings seriously. “The research team that conducted this study has liaised with the food companies and is following up the positive samples with further retesting to ensure the issue is resolved,” she said. In addition to urging consumers to be diligent in reading labels, and to report any suspect products, “Coeliac Australia advises all people with coeliac disease to have regular medical check-ups as they do have a serious autoimmune condition and medical assessment is important to determine that their gluten-free diet is going well and no complications are developing.” Read more at: TheGuardian.com
  2. Hi guys. I've had three blood tests for celiac, all negative, and one biopsy that I'm still waiting for the results of. I have a lot of the symptoms, and my body has been breaking down and getting sicker over the past year. I have gut pain, constipation, piles, sometimes loose stools, gas, muscle pain, bone pain, a fuzzy/light head, noise and light sensitivity, bleeding gums and mouth ulcers. But the worst is chronic acid reflux, which has been resistant to treatment. The endoscopy I had on April 30th found a hiatal hernia, which I didn't have when I had my first endoscopy in 2015. The area was full of acid and bile, which I have always been able to feel, 24/7. For the last 6+ years I've been on the IBS and the acid reflux diet. No FODMAPS (which seems to be everything), and nothing with acid in, like citric acid. I've decided to go gluten-free now, without waiting for my results, and my father has just found out that his last blood test had raised transglutaminase and was "strongly suggestive of coeliac," which has motivated me even more. But finding gluten-free alternatives is proving difficult, especially bread. The problem isn't so much taste, as acid and IBS triggers in the ingredients. All the gluten-free breads I can find contain acids like citric acid, honey, vinegar, and apple, and others contain possible IBS triggers like bamboo fibre (?) and Quinoa, which the jury seems to be out on in regards to IBS. I suspect I have to continue avoiding these ingredients as my gut is very painful and sensitive, and I'm worried about worsening gut symptoms instead of healing. Are these ingredients actually safe when the problem is (or could be) gluten? Or do they tear through the gut if the gut is damaged? I wouldn't bother with bread, but I'm 10 pounds underweight and I get a lot of flak about it, and honestly I've been getting most of my calories through bread, and don't know how to get calories without it. There is so much food I have to avoid, if not "IBS" triggers, then acidic foods. I won't touch something acidic with a barge pole! I don't really know what my question is, I feel stumped here! But any ideas would be much appreciated. Also, I live in the UK, so some brands aren't available here. I wondered if supermarket-own gluten-free bread is OK for celiacs, as although it has the crossed grain symbol, isn't it manufactured in the same place, and therefore possibly contaminated? I thought I had this gluten-free-thing figured out months in advance (I've done a lot of reading since my doctor suggested celiac last year), but turns out, I haven't the foggiest what to do. I'm thinking of quitting food, to be honest with you. Thanks for any replies!?
  3. StoneRose

    Celiac Coach?

    I was speaking with someone, and thinking this could be very helpful for newly diagnosed people. Especially if it's for your child. To figure out what is OK in your kitchen, how to read labels at the supermarket, how to eat at restaurants, kid's parties, schools, travel, etc. I hope the poll works - curious to see what people think. Thanks!!
  4. Having given up all cereals at the time of going gluten free I was tempted back to the 'dark side' by Nestle. Their 'Go Free' range are delicious, excellent corn flakes and very good rice crispies (sorry Kelloggs, 'Pops' then) if I feel like a nostalgic return to childhood. One thing I like about them is the box size, design etc is very much akin to the 'normal' products which now reside in the Supermarket area I like to call 'Mordor' - the forbidden lands I used to roam, but where evil lurks behind every pack or tin can... Instead of being from some niche form of supplier with niche labelling, niche packet size all of which scream 'NICHE' this is a pack very much like the Orcs eat Last time I went shopping I picked up my corn flakes without much thought and it was only later when I was looking in the cupboard that I spotted the fearsome Dark Lord of the Sith Wannabe 'Kylo Ren' glowering at me. It surprised me. Not because I was clearly a very bad Jedi knight, failing to sense the presence of a dark side user under my nose (although this is undoubtedly true) but because this was the first time I could recall a genuine bona fide movie promo appearing on a gluten free product.... Check it out for yourself: https://www.nestle-cereals.com/uk/en/starwars Now many will think this is not the most important thing I could've written about and you're correct, but I found myself very happy to see this and not just because it's Star Wars... It's because I thought of all those coeliac or gluten sensitive kids across the country who have to eat all their meals from niche packaging and never get to participate in one of those silly but fun childhood rituals of opening a pack, collecting codes or coupons, 'winning' a promotional plastic cup or toy robot. Now I know this is marketing, that the execs who came up with the promos don't give a toss etc. But for once this is some advertising that I actually like seeing. I like the thought of kids choosing whether they get a Kylo or Rey pack or even kicking off if some hapless parent gets the wrong one So well done fearsome Disney marketing team and the somewhat checkered multi-national conglomerate Nestle for including these 'niche' consumers in your latest drive to cover the world in Star Wars logos, Yay, even beyond the very aisles of Mordor itself. May the force be with you.
  5. Celiac.com 02/22/2016 - Are supermarkets charging extreme prices for certified gluten-free foods, which are basically the same as their non-certified counterparts? A Channel 4 exposé of stores in the United Kingdom shows that shoppers are paying huge mark-ups for store brand gluten-free products, while similar unlabeled foods are much cheaper in other parts of the store. The Channel 4 probe found huge price differences between certified gluten-free sauces, soups and crackers and regular equivalents that do not naturally have any wheat or gluten ingredients. The greatest price discrepancy seem to be for products bearing the supermarkets' private "Free From" labels. For example, Channel 4 found that Tesco charges 64% more for its Free From gluten-free plain wholegrain rice cakes than it charges for lightly salted ones, also without gluten. Tesco's 460g Free From ketchup costs nearly double its regular ketchup, which also contains no gluten ingredients. Meanwhile at rival Sainsbury's, a 300g Free From juicy tomato and basil soup sells for 3 times the price of a 400g regular tomato and basil soup with no gluten ingredients. Lastly, Sainsbury's 300g Free From massala sauce was priced at nearly 65% more than a 500g jar of regular massala sauce, which also has no gluten. Of course, the trick here is that we are comparing certified gluten-free store brands with similar products with no gluten ingredients. For many people, certified gluten-free products provide a degree of safety that they are willing to pay a premium price for. However, in many cases, a journey away from the gluten-free aisle and some quick ingredient checking might get you a product that is as gluten-free as the certified products, and works every bit as well. As always, consumers should be aware, read labels, and make choices that work for them. Source: thesun.co.uk
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