Jump to content
  • Sign Up

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'supplement'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Celiac Disease & Gluten-Free Diet Forums

  • Diagnosis & Recovery, Related Disorders & Research
    • Calendar of Events
    • Celiac Disease Pre-Diagnosis, Testing & Symptoms
    • Post Diagnosis, Recovery & Treatment of Celiac Disease
    • Related Disorders & Celiac Research
    • Dermatitis Herpetiformis
    • Gluten Sensitivity and Behavior
  • Support & Help
    • Coping with Celiac Disease
    • Publications & Publicity
    • Parents' Corner
    • Gab/Chat Room
    • Doctors Treating Celiac Disease
    • Teenagers & Young Adults Only
    • Pregnancy
    • Friends and Loved Ones of Celiacs
    • Meeting Room
    • Celiac Disease & Sleep
    • Celiac Support Groups
  • Gluten-Free Lifestyle
    • Gluten-Free Foods, Products, Shopping & Medications
    • Gluten-Free Recipes & Cooking Tips
    • Gluten-Free Restaurants
    • Ingredients & Food Labeling Issues
    • Traveling with Celiac Disease
    • Weight Issues & Celiac Disease
    • International Room (Outside USA)
    • Sports and Fitness
  • When A Gluten-Free Diet Just Isn't Enough
    • Food Intolerance & Leaky Gut
    • Super Sensitive People
    • Alternative Diets
  • Forum Technical Assistance
    • Board/Forum Technical Help
  • DFW/Central Texas Celiacs's Events
  • DFW/Central Texas Celiacs's Groups/Organizations in the DFW area

Celiac Disease & Gluten-Free Diet Blogs

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.

Categories

  • Celiac.com Sponsors
  • Celiac Disease
  • Safe Gluten-Free Food List / Unsafe Foods & Ingredients
  • Gluten-Free Food & Product Reviews
  • Gluten-Free Recipes
    • American & International Foods
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Biscuits, Rolls & Buns
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Noodles & Dumplings
    • Gluten-Free Dessert Recipes: Pastries, Cakes, Cookies, etc.
    • Gluten-Free Bread Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Flour Mixes
    • Gluten-Free Kids Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Snacks & Appetizers
    • Gluten-Free Muffin Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Pancake Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Pizza Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Soups, Sauces, Dressings & Chowders
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Cooking Tips
    • Gluten-Free Scone Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Waffle Recipes
  • Celiac Disease Diagnosis, Testing & Treatment
  • Celiac Disease & Gluten Intolerance Research
  • Miscellaneous Information on Celiac Disease
    • Additional Celiac Disease Concerns
    • Celiac Disease Research Projects, Fundraising, Epidemiology, Etc.
    • Conferences, Publicity, Pregnancy, Church, Bread Machines, Distillation & Beer
    • Gluten-Free Diet, Celiac Disease & Codex Alimentarius Wheat Starch
    • Gluten-Free Food Ingredient Labeling Regulations
    • Celiac.com Podcast Edition
  • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity
    • Spring 2019 Issue
    • Winter 2019 Issue
    • Autumn 2018 Issue
    • Summer 2018 Issue
    • Spring 2018 Issue
    • Winter 2018 Issue
    • Autumn 2017 Issue
    • Summer 2017 Issue
    • Spring 2017 Issue
    • Winter 2017 Issue
    • Autumn 2016 Issue
    • Summer 2016 Issue
    • Spring 2016 Issue
    • Winter 2016 Issue
    • Autumn 2015 Issue
    • Summer 2015 Issue
    • Spring 2015 Issue
    • Winter 2015 Issue
    • Autumn 2014 Issue
    • Summer 2014 Issue
    • Spring 2014 Issue
    • Winter 2014 Issue
    • Autumn 2013 Issue
    • Summer 2013 Issue
    • Spring 2013 Issue
    • Winter 2013 Issue
    • Autumn 2012 Issue
    • Summer 2012 Issue
    • Spring 2012 Issue
    • Winter 2012 Issue
    • Autumn 2011 Issue
    • Summer 2011 Issue
    • Spring 2011 Issue
    • Spring 2006 Issue
    • Summer 2005 Issue
  • Celiac Disease & Related Diseases and Disorders
  • The Origins of Celiac Disease
  • Gluten-Free Grains and Flours
  • Oats and Celiac Disease: Are They Gluten-Free?
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • Celiac Disease Support Groups
  • Celiac Disease Doctor Listing
  • Kids and Celiac Disease
  • Gluten-Free Travel
  • Gluten-Free Cooking
  • Gluten-Free
  • Allergy vs. Intolerance
  • Tax Deductions for Gluten-Free Food
  • Gluten-Free Newsletters & Magazines
  • Gluten-Free & Celiac Disease Links
  • History of Celiac.com

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Interests


Location


First Name


Last Name


City


State


Country


How did you hear about us?

Found 9 results

  1. Celiac.com 02/07/2017 - There's been a great deal of excitement, and plenty of confusion, among celiac sufferers about a drug that breaks down gluten into harmless smaller molecules. The good news is that the drug, GluteGuard, has shown some early promise in treating gluten intolerance in randomized human trials. The enzyme supplement currently available through Glutagen's website, and registered in Australia as a "listed complementary medicine". The bad news is that the drug is not designed as a cure for people with celiac disease, and even the company that makes the drug has concerns about exaggerated reports of how widely it can be used. The maker, Glutagen, claims that: "GluteGuard has been clinically evaluated in people with celiac disease who were challenged with 1gm of gluten per day for six weeks. GluteGuard was shown to significantly protect these patients from the serious symptoms they would normally experience after gluten ingestion. It is clear that GluteGuard prevents inadvertently ingested gluten from triggering the common symptoms of gluten sensitivity, whether individuals have coeliac disease, NCGS or other gluten allergies. GluteGuard was expressly designed for digesting the gluten peptides that induce symptoms and histological damage. Clinical studies proving it's utility were conducted in celiacs and dermatitis Herpetiformis individuals." The company is doing further studies, but as yet, at least as far as those who have celiac disease are concerned, there is only evidence that it may be a hedge against accidental gluten ingestion. GluteGuard is based on the papaya enzyme, caricain, which not only reduces gluten to smaller molecules, but further breaks down those products that negatively impact individuals affected by gluten. The company recently sought to clarify confusion among people with celiac disease by issuing a statement that reads in part: "The manufacturer of GluteGuard, Glutagen, advises the supplement is not a treatment or cure for coeliac disease and it is essential that people with coeliac disease maintain a strict gluten free diet." Bottom line is that if you have celiac disease, you must maintain a strict gluten-fee diet, and never willingly eat gluten, no matter what kind of supplements you take. Hoever, it you regularly travel or eat outside of your home it may be a good idea to use this supplement. Celiac.com will be among the first to announce any kind of cure or change to celiac disease treatment that might change that. Until then, stay tuned, and stay informed. Read an important notice regarding GluteGuard for people with celiac disease: Celiac.org.au This article was revised by Celiac.com on 11/02/2017 to address concerns that were raised by GluteGuard.
  2. Celiac.com 08/16/2018 - What is the significance of vitamin D serum levels in adult celiac patients? A pair of researchers recently set out to assess the value and significance of 25(OH) and 1,25(OH) vitamin D serum levels in adult celiac patients through a comprehensive review of medical literature. Researchers included F Zingone and C Ciacci are affiliated with the Gastroenterology Unit, Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology, University of Padua, Padua, Italy; and the Celiac Center, AOU San Giovanni di Dio e Ruggi di Aragona, University of Salerno, Department of Medicine and Surgery, Salerno, Italy. Within the wide spectrum of symptoms and alteration of systems that characterizes celiac disease, several studies indicate a low-level of vitamin D, therefore recent guidelines suggest its evaluation at the time of diagnosis. This review examines the data from existing studies in which vitamin D has been assessed in celiac patients. Our review indicates that most of the studies on vitamin D in adult celiac disease report a 25 (OH) vitamin D deficiency at diagnosis that disappears when the patient goes on a gluten-free diet, independently of any supplementation. Instead, the researchers found that levels of calcitriol, the active 1,25 (OH) form of vitamin D, fell within the normal range at the time of celiac diagnosis. Basically, their study strongly suggests that people with celiac disease can recover normal vitamin D levels through a gluten-free diet, without requiring any supplementation. Source: Dig Liver Dis. 2018 Aug;50(8):757-760. doi: 10.1016/j.dld.2018.04.005. Epub 2018 Apr 13.
  3. I belong to Gluten Free Watch Dog, which is like a mini Consumer Reports (an independent group that tests products and I belong to both). Believe me, this is worth the $5.00 per month or so subscription and I highly recommend supporting their efforts in keeping celiacs safe. What? Pay for it? Come on....how many of you subscribe to magazines without a thought? Here's some information I borrowed from their "About" section of the Gluten Free Watch Dog website: "Gluten Free Watchdog, LLC was founded by Tricia Thompson, MS, RD to make state-of-the-art gluten-free food testing data available directly to you, the consumer. Unfortunately, the Food and Drug Administration under the gluten-free labeling rule is NOT requiring manufacturers to test their labeled gluten-free foods for gluten contamination. Contamination of naturally gluten-free grains and flours with wheat, barley, and rye is a concern to many people who must eat gluten-free. In a study conducted by Tricia Thompson, Anne Lee, and Thomas Grace, 32% of the naturally gluten-free grains and flours tested contained gluten in amounts greater than 20 parts per million. Gluten contamination can occur in the fields where food is grown, in the trucks and railcars where food is transported, and in the processing and manufacturing plants where food is made ready for the consumer. It is our hope that independently testing labeled gluten-free products and making results available to subscribers will allow you to feel more confident in the products you buy. Gluten Free Watchdog, LLC tests labeled gluten-free foods. In June 2013 Gluten Free Watchdog also started testing products that appear to be free of gluten-containing ingredients but are not labeled gluten-free. All product test results are posted, regardless of findings. See the FAQ page for information on testing protocols. For more informaton please see Introduction to Gluten Free Watchdog. Going back to my topic, Tricia recently tested this probiotic. Jarro-Dophilus EPS and found that it contained gluten despite the label stating that it contains "No gluten" and has a little gluten free logo. It is recommended that celiacs not use this product at this time. You will recall celiac doctors at the Columbia University Medical Center were perplexed as to why celiac patients who were strictly gluten free were not healing. They found that 55% of the probiotics they tested contained traces of gluten! https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/05/150515083232.htm So, 1) I encourage you to support Gluten Free WatchDog and 2) be wary of supplements and make sure they are gluten free and they really contain the ingredients they state on the label. It is a shame that food manufacturers like Kraft and ConAgra seem to do a better job than supplement manufacturers. Disclaimer: This is in no way affiliated with celiac.com and is based on my own personal opinion and insight.
  4. Celiac.com 07/05/2016 - Principal Investigator: Amrit P.S. Narula M.D, F.A.C.P, F.A.C.G, F.A.C.N., A.G.A.F Study Coordinator: Alicia Mercuri, PA-C Background Research estimates that approximately 18 million Americans have gluten sensitivity. That is six times more than patients confirmed with celiac disease. Non-celiac gluten sensitivity is defined as those individuals who cannot tolerate gluten in the diet and experience the same symptoms attributed to celiac disease, but lack antibodies and intestinal damage as seen in celiac disease. A dietary supplement called ZyGluten was developed from in vitro studies, not in vivo. The primary aim in its development was a supplement which, if taken at the beginning of a meal, would hydrolyze gluten concentration in ingested food. Foods tested included McDonald's hamburger, white sliced bread, a plain bagel, macaroni and cheese, spaghetti, a muffin, and frozen pizza. The amount of gluten was measured at 0, 30 and 60 minutes after the introduction of ZyGluten. In all samples, gluten measured at the end of 60 minutes was less than 20 ppm. ZyGluten is a compound of amylases, proteases, and lipase enzymes with probiotics, specifically Lactococcus lactis and Lactococcus cremoris. It is derived from plant and microbial sources. Inclusion Criteria Ages 18-80 years Physician diagnosed gluten sensitivity by history and experienced symptoms of gluten sensitivity for at least 1 month prior to involvement Willing to take supplement twice daily for 2 weeks Sign informed consent Exclusion criteria Active Inflammatory Disease Celiac disease confirmed by antibodies and duodenal biopsy Peptic ulcer disease Lactose intolerance Pregnant or lactating women Received any experimental drug within 30 days of enrollment Methods 27 patients, all of whom met the inclusion criteria, were selected to take 2 capsules of ZyGlutens before 2 major meals of the day for 2 weeks. 23 patients were female and 4 were male, with ages ranging from 25-77. The following symptoms were assessed at baseline, week 1, and week 2 which was the conclusion of the study: Abdominal pain Diarrhea Constipation Headaches Joint pain Fatigue The severity of symptoms was measured as mild, moderate, or severe, and none if symptoms were absent. All patients were contacted by phone within 48 hours of start of the trial to assess for any adverse effects. Following parameters were checked at baseline, week 1, and week 2: Weight Height Blood pressure Pulse rate Respiration rate Patients were not charged or reimbursed for their participation in the study. Results The following number of patients (27) had these symptoms at baseline: None Mild Moderate Severe Abdominal Pain/Cramping 1 1 16 9 Bloating/Distention 0 3 9 15 Diarrhea 10 4 2 11 Constipation 16 2 3 6 Headaches 11 5 7 4 Joint Pains 12 2 9 4 Fatigue 3 4 5 15 The following number of patients (23) had these symptoms at week 1: None Mild Moderate Severe Abdominal pain/Cramping 10 7 4 2 Bloating/Distention 9 10 1 3 Diarrhea 16 5 2 0 Constipation 20 1 1 1 Headaches 17 2 3 1 Joint Pains 14 2 4 3 Fatigue 7 8 3 5 The following number of patients (23) had these symptoms at week 2: None Mild Moderate Severe Abdominal Pain/Cramping 15 4 2 2 Bloating/Distention 14 6 1 2 Diarrhea 21 1 1 0 Constipation 21 1 0 1 Headaches 16 5 1 1 Joint Pains 17 3 2 1 Fatigue 10 7 1 5 The following number of patients rated their symptom improvement as: No improvement: 0 Improved: 4 Markedly improved: 19 Adverse Effects No patients reported any adverse effects. Participants Twenty-seven participants were enrolled in the study. Two patients withdrew from the study; one of which had a scheduling conflict with follow-up visits and one stopped taking the medication due to increased sleepiness after two pills. Two patients were lost to follow-up. These four patients were excluded from analysis. Conclusion In conclusion, ZyGluten study is a 2 week open labeled trial. Our outcome so far has shown to be extremely efficacious with no significant side effects. There was no significant difference found in patients who complained of headaches or joint pain. The majority of the patients found significant improvement in their symptoms of abdominal pain, bloating, changes in bowel habits, and fatigue. In fact, 83% of patients rated that their symptoms markedly improved, and 17% rated an improvement in their symptoms. Patient Testimonials *The medication was known by patients as ‘Gluten Buster' during the clinical trial. "Medication has given me more freedom. I am no longer afraid to eat, especially away from home. I am very pleased with the medication".-MF "My symptoms have improved. I would like to keep taking this if I can, especially since it's natural, to see how long I can go without an endoscopy".-MH "I feel that this pill has made a tremendous improvement in my condition". –BW "Bloating is gone. Stools seem to be more formed. Feeling good". –PS "It's wonderful to not be limited in what I can eat. It's great not to have the symptoms of pain, etc. when eating gluten foods". –JH "Great for bloating".-JF "Very little of passing gas. I feel good". -PW "Bloating is a lot better". -LW "I have not had any cramping or urgency to have a BM after a meal. My bowel movements are now normal. I have had no GI distress since on the meds". –KY "Gluten Buster has been a miracle pill. After so many years of having bowel problems, I never knew what it was like to have a regular bowel movement. I have had no problems with digestive system since I starting taking these pills". -JM "Medication was very helpful". –KO "My experience with the Gluten Buster that Dr. Narula has given me to take has been simply amazing. It has made my quality of life so much better. He is an amazing doctor to help those that otherwise thought there was no hope! I feel great"!-CM "Seems a little bit better. Still have IBS. Still have a lot of gas and bloating."-AM "It has been helping to go to the bathroom. The weight is going up and the stomach is going down a little bit".-SH "Before taking the medicine, mornings were hard because of bloating and diarrhea. Now I feel great in the morning".-GK "Gluten Buster is a life changer. Will definitely go on it when available in market." -MC "It is helping with bloating and gas. Has improved all of my GI symptoms. Overall, I can eat anything, including French fries and food I could not eat before (Super Pill)". -MK "I feel it has improved. Still have bloating, but eating regular food. Diarrhea has improved, no pain in stomach or abdomen". -BS "I feel 10x better than I did before starting the medication. No stomach cramps of bloating, I only have a BM twice/day. Feel great!" -JB "I am doing 100% better now since I have been taking the Gluten Buster meds". - JZ "Passing more gas, feeling better". -ML "I'm feeling better. I'm eating anything I want, not sticking with gluten free food. If it's due to taking the Gluten Buster, then I would still take it". -BS "It has made a big difference in bloating and abdominal pain. I would like to continue taking it". -JP "My stomach feels fantastic when I take the product. This should be available for all people with gluten sensitivity. This would be a great idea for Shark Tank. It needs to be available to the masses! I don't know how my stomach will survive without it, especially at the holidays". -LT References Am J Gastroenterol. 2011 Mar;106(3):508-14; quiz 515. doi: 10.1038/ajg.2010.487. Epub 2011 Jan 11. Gluten causes gastrointestinal symptoms in subjects without celiac disease: a double-blind randomized placebo-controlled trial. Biesiekierski JR1, Newnham ED, Irving PM, Barrett JS, Haines M, Doecke JD, Shepherd SJ, Muir JG, Gibson PR. The Oslo definitions for celiac disease and related terms. Jonas F Ludvigsson,1,2 Daniel A Leffler,3 Julio C Bai,4 Federico Biagi,5 Alessio Fasano,6 Peter H R Green,7 Marios Hadjivassiliou,8 Katri Kaukinen,9 Ciaran P Kelly,3 Jonathan N Leonard,10 Knut Erik Aslaksen Lundin,11 Joseph A Murray,12 David S Sanders,13,14 Marjorie M Walker,14 Fabiana Zingone,15 Carolina Ciacci16 Food Allergy - An Overview (PDF|1 MB). DHHS. NIH. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2014 Jun-Jul;37(6):362-71. doi: 10.1016/j.gastrohep.2014.01.005. Epub 2014 Mar 22. [Non-celiac gluten sensitivity: a critical review of current evidence]. [Article in Spanish] Molina-Infante J1, Santolaria S2, Montoro M2, Esteve M3, Fernández-Bañares F3. Gluten Causes Gastrointestinal Symptoms in Subjects Without Celiac Disease: A Double-Blind Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial. Jessica R Biesiekierski, Evan D Newnham, Peter M Irving, Jacqueline S Barrett, Melissa Haines, James D Doecke, Susan J Shepherd, Jane G Muir and Peter R Gibson. Nutrients. 2013 Sep 26;5(10):3839-53. doi: 10.3390/nu5103839. Non-Celiac Gluten sensitivity: the new frontier of gluten related disorders. Catassi C1, Bai JC, Bonaz B, Bouma G, Calabrò A, Carroccio A, Castillejo G, Ciacci C, Cristofori F, Dolinsek J, Francavilla R, Elli L, Green P, Holtmeier W, Koehler P, Koletzko S, Meinhold C, Sanders D, Schumann M, Schuppan D, Ullrich R, Vécsei A, Volta U, Zevallos V, Sapone A, Fasano A. BMC Med. 2014 May 23;12:86. doi: 10.1186/1741-7015-12-86. Non-celiac gluten sensitivity - why worry? Lundin KE. BMC Med. 2014 May 23;12:85. doi: 10.1186/1741-7015-12-85. An Italian prospective multicenter survey on patients suspected of having non-celiac gluten sensitivity. Volta U1, Bardella MT, Calabrò Neurogastroenterol Motil. 2013 Nov;25(11):864-71. doi: 10.1111/nmo.12216. Epub 2013 Aug 12. Non-celiac gluten sensitivity: clinical relevance and recommendations for future research. Mooney PD1, Aziz I, Sanders DS. World J Gastroenterol. 2014 Jul 21;20(27):8837-45. doi: 10.3748/wjg.v20.i27.8837. Irritable bowel syndrome and food interaction. Cuomo R, Andreozzi P, Zito FP, Passananti V, De Carlo G, Sarnelli G. Expert Rev Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2012;6(1):43-55. Problems of an Emerging Condition Separate From Celiac Disease. Amy C Brown Dig Dis Sci. 1999 Jul;44(7):1317-21. Pancreatic supplements reduce symptomatic response of healthy subjects to a high fat meal. Suarez F1, Levitt MD, Adshead J, Barkin JS.
  5. Hi all! I saw a really OLD post here about the Emergen-C Supplement. I think we need a more "modern" update on this product. I have bad allergies and that stuff really helps. I know they don't guarantee it to be gluten free on their web site, and I've called them and they said ... they cannot guarantee the "ingredients" in their product to be gluten free. So, what I'm wondering ... does anybody take this product WITHOUT problems of gluten reaction from it? Thanks!
  6. Ok for those of you who do not know me I travel a lot. So from time to time I accidentally ingest gluten in one form or another. For instance I found out today that Sodium Starch Glycolate is technically gluten and can cause a full reaction in someone who is as sensitive to it as I am. Thanks to #glutenfreeinsc post I now know what I was getting in my diet that was causing a reaction. So I've decided to start trying different things that can help me either get better faster once I ingest gluten or reduce the reaction if taken daily. Keep in mind that I am a little bit eccentric at times. Tral 1: zGlutn by systemic formulas I decided to eat a slice of bread and take 4 pills at the same time. I know this is insane but I wanted to know if it worked. So I ate the bread during lunch and told my boss that If i didn't make it into work the next day I was probably dead... The next two hours: a little cloudy feeling but not very severe. And no GI issues. That evening: Kept working and didn't feel very cloudy but had to pace myself. I was a little tired but still no severe reaction Went home and went to bed after a light dinner. My stomach was growling a bit but no pain and no noticeable diarrhea or nausea. This was a surprise to me since I always feel very sick, get stuck in the bathroom and can't think straight after I get gluten. I also get a rash around my mouth. I know that's gross but you understand my plight. Next Morning: a little bit of a hot feeling in my stomach but nothing too bad. I felt a little bit cloudy but still functional. Worked through the day no problem except for a two trips to the lavatory. Conclusion: helped a ton. Wouldn't recommend trying this at home because it wasn't a cure but if you get gluten by accident it can reduce your symptoms dramatically. I've been taking it every day and it seems to be helping. Has anyone else tried this product? I got it from a nutritionist. Iang if anyone has a product that works for them as vitamin I want to try it. apparently ciliact is terrible. I'll keep trying supplements and diets and keep you guys updated.
  7. Wellesse’s Digestive 3-In-1 Health liquid dietary supplement provides prebiotics and soluble fiber, (which are both key to maintaining healthy gut microbiotia) as well as aloe vera to balance stomach acidity. These are all important supplements for maintaining a healthy digestive system and Wellesse brings them all together in a form that the body can easily absorb. Taken with juice, the supplement is very easy to fit into your morning routine (perhaps easier than pills, for those who have trouble swallowing them). After a week or two, I was noticing more digestive regularity, I was feeling full from meals quicker and I had dramatically reduced acid reflux. Overall, my digestive system feels… well, healthier. Wellesse’s Digestive 3-in-1 Health Liquid Dietary Supplement makes a great digestive health ‘cocktail’. Just be sure to take some kind of probiotic supplement as well. Visit their site for more info: www.wellesse.com. Note: Articles that appear in the "Gluten-Free Food Reviews" section of this site are paid advertisements. For more information about this see our Advertising Page.
  8. Needing extra protein in your gluten-free diet? Then I would highly suggest trying biPro's gluten-free unflavored whey protein. It is usually hard enough for me to find a gluten free-protein powder, but it is even more difficult to find one that is versatile and doesn't clump. Recently I tried biPro and I decided to just pour some of the protein powder in my cup of chocolate milk and just mixed it up with a spoon. Unless you try this for yourself, you probably won't believe me when I say that the chocolate milk tasted just like chocolate milk and the powder dissolved beautifully. For more info visit: www.biProUSA.com Note:Articles thatappearin the "Gluten-Free Food & SpecialtyProduct Companies" section ofthis site are paid advertisements. Formoreinformation about this seeour AdvertisingPage.
  9. Since being diagnosed with celiac disease I have found that adding gluten-free vitamins to my diet has been particularly helpful with my overall healing process. Unfortunately, the vast assortment of gluten-free vitamins that were necessary to incorporate into my daily diet had quickly taken over my cupboard, and it wasn't long before I started to grow tired of the whole process of figuring out which vitamins I needed to take, and when to take them. I was looking for an easy way to simplify this whole process, and that is when I discovered CeliAct, a nutritional supplement made especially for people with celiac disease. This is not just your typical gluten-free multi-vitamin, as it also contains a bone building formula, an intestinal healing blend, a probiotic defense and digestive enzyme support. That basically puts everything that I was trying to take before into a single pill, and according to the recommended dosage I would only have to take six of them a day. I was eager to give CeliAct a try because I was just about ready to give up on my old vitamin regimen. The size each CeliAct pill is comparable in size to your average vitamin, and I found them to be very gentle on my stomach (and I have a very sensitive stomach so that is saying a lot!). Due to the simplicity of only having to take CeliAct twice a day, I found it very easy to include them in my daily routine. When traveling I can just throw some in a bag instead of having to bring multiple types of pills. I feel better knowing that I am giving my body the extra nutrients it was deprived of for so long, and the convenience that CeliAct provides makes it so easy that I can't justify not taking them. Discovering this new product has been so beneficial that I just had to share the news! Visit their site for more info: www.celiact.com Note:Articles that appearin the "Gluten-Free Food & SpecialtyProduct Companies" section ofthis site are paid advertisements. Formore information about this seeour AdvertisingPage.
×
×
  • Create New...