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Found 20 results

  1. I've been hearing that L-glutamine is helpful for healing leaky gut but I can't find specific scientific literature explaining how it works. The journal abstracts that mention L-glutamine in passing discuss enzymes like TG2 (transglutaminase) and their role in converting peptides. It is really confusing to understand what they are saying. Can anyone point me to some good research that is clearly about this and explains how the body uses L-glutamine to heal the gut?
  2. Oops well I blew it big time. I failed to carefully read a supplement label. I saw that the company selling it said that it was gluten/soy free, but the ingredient list clearly showed that it wasn't. I took it for 200 days. I and my health care triangle couldn't figure out why I was swelling/ and gaining weight big time. The problems didn't stop there, we noted increased liver enzymes, and 3 months later sluggish kidney function. With treatment, the liver enzymes had gone down to normal levels. I kept taking the wrong supplement over last fall and winter. I felt more and more over-whelmed and unable to carry out my usual work. Finally recently, I went to order another several bottles of the supplement and discovered the ingredient list. I ran for my bottle in the freezer, oh sure, there it was. I quit taking the supplement right away. Then, it seemed like my real trouble began. My lymph system went wild, my thighs got enormous with ripples. I was cold and achy. This couldn't be from just one little bitty supplement? It was. A few months later, we tested my thyroid and found that it was working very hard. I wonder if anyone that has dealt with thyroid could answer this: Do we know the mechanism that brings a thyroid down. Is it always antibodies? We tested TPO which was negative, but didn't check the other kind of antibodies that I know of now. I am recovering so I am not sure if I should check the thyroid again and check the both antibodies or not. I can try a round of thyroid medicine to see if it helps, but would rather avoid it...well, unless I absolutely need it.
  3. Hello everyone! My mom recommended this site and I already feel comforted and not insane anymore reading what you guys have said about your experiences... so let me introduce you to my hell. So I was diagnosed with a gluten allergy in 7th grade and completely ignored it... not even knowing what gluten was. For example, one year my friends got me a huge box with 48 packs of pop tarts inside and I ate every single one in about a month. Let's just say I'm a pig. I always took pride in myself for being able to eat like a monster and still be skinny and an amazing athlete. I was an excellent swimmer and always went to States and Nationals with my school team, mind you while not being on year round teams at all. I think it was 2 years ago, yes, April 22, 2016, the doctor told my mom and I and that I have Crohn's disease and that I need to go on drugs immediately. Of course I was in denial for the next 6 months and still am to some degree and kept eating gluten in sadness, fear and denial. I went on Imuran for about 3 1/2 months but of course, the lovely teen that I am I didn't take many of the pills. My mom and I "doctor shopped" a lot because she has always been into the natural route and I love and trust her fully so I listened to her. I had a colonoscopy done and didn't eat much of anything. I remember there was a period of maybe a month where all I could keep in was white rice with butter. It felt like candy I'm not kidding. Anyways, we bounced around from 4 different doctors till we finally found an integrative medicine doctor who was willing to help and was certain he could heal me. I was finally ready to accept Crohn's and do what I could to heal myself naturally. I'd seen too many documentaries on our current food (What the Health and Supersize Me for example) and read too much online about the effects of long term high class drugs--the biologics like Humira etc. and was scared that my little body would't be able to handle it so why not try the natural route. So my current doctor did blood work and collected stool--as most do, and it came back that I was severely allergic to 60 out of the main 61 types of gluten or whatever the number is...I was a rare case for him and very severe. I also presented allergies to rice, eggs, most meats--I can eat cooked chicken and pork , allergic to most vegetables and most fruits, and seafood--I can have raw and cooked salmon, cooked sea bass, trout and raw tuna. So now I am left with not many options and a million supplements to take. So I have some questions for anyone willing to help me... 1) Does anyone else have severe food allergies like me and can you make any suggestions for recipes? I take SeaCure--a fish protein supplement in between meals but I need some protein to eat! I love to eat and have already lost yet another pound because I am just not getting enough nutrients even though they are gluten free and safe foods. 2) How long till my hair will get thick and beautiful again?? I read that Imran affects hair and makes you lose it and thin it out...how long will it take to heal that?? 3) My skin, especially my hands crack really badly and the lines are white with rawness and dryness. Help me! I use Palmer's Coconut Oil Formula which is gluten-free and because I can have coconuts. Anyone have any other good recommendations for gluten-free lotions? My hands are painful! 4) Has anyone been so severe like me where you haven't been pregnant but have hemorrhoids on the outside of your butt?? Super weird and uncomfortable...Have they ever gone back in? Also, what should I do to relieve the burning sensation they give me? Or that area in general? 5) I am only 19 but long to have a family one day and lots of children. If I healed myself by the time I was let's say 26, do you think I could have kids?? 6) Speaking of kids, I haven't had my period in over two years. When should I expect that to come back? 7) Does anyone else crack their hands, neck, fingers, back, knees, or toes? I do and I'm wondering if that could be related to joint/skeletal discomfort.. 8) When will my irritability go away? I used to be the happiest person on earth and never cursed but now it seems like it's all I do. I hate feeling this way!! 9) Do you have any recommendations like meal prepping or anything to help me? I am in college and have no time to do anything already...Have any fast and easy meals to make that will last the weekdays? 10) I have talked your ears off so I am so thankful if any of you read this far. I appreciate any advice and am so thankful for this website!! I attached my the list of foods that I can and cannot eat if any of you can make recipe suggestions off of the green and yellow foods. Yellows can be tried once a week or every few days if I can tolerate them. Otherwise they go on the red list--which are no-no foods. Thank you so much!! List of Food.docx
  4. Celiac.com 06/08/2015 - Many people with celiac disease take probiotic supplements to aid with digestion and improve gut health. However, a new study reveals that many popular probiotics actually contain traces of gluten, which is worrying for people who may have celiac disease or gluten intolerance. Researchers at the Celiac Disease Center at Columbia University Medical Center used a detection technique called liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to analyze 22 popular, high-selling probiotics and measure gluten content. The team found that more than half of them (55%) contained gluten, including products labeled "gluten-free," according to research presented on May 16 at Digestive and Disease Week in Washington DC. For reasons doubtless including liability, the team did not list the names of the brands or products they tested. It is safe to assume that these would include major, easily accessible brands. These revelations may be unsurprising, given recent reports about gluten contamination in dietary supplements. So, if you have celiac disease or gluten intolerance, and take probiotic supplements, be sure to double-check your products; they may contain traces of gluten. Source: Time Magazine
  5. Hi there, I just noticed my iron supplement contains Iron Polymaltose. This is derived from both iron and Maltol. Maltol is obtained from roasted malt. ROASTED MALT ?. Soooo a person goes to the doctors, is diagnosed with Celiac and as part of the treatment plan is prescribed an iron supplement that contains Maltol, an extract from malt, to help raise their iron levels? These doctors are killing us. Anyway please be careful and read all labelling carefully. I only noticed this myself as I kept getting bloating and skin rashes after taking my iron supplement only to find out it contains polymaltose a derivative of Maltol. Also I really had to go digging to find out how polymaltose is derived. I FINALLY stumbled, after much effort, across a site that says it comes from Maltol, which in turn comes from roasted malt. Talk about futher igniting the fire. Anyway here is the link that shows iron polymaltose is obtained from iron and maltol. info. https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/548571_2 Here is the link showing Maltol is obtained from roasted malt. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maltol
  6. Celiac.com 05/02/2017 - Do women who use dietary supplements during pregnancy face higher rates of celiac disease in their offspring? To answer this question a team examined the maternal use of vitamin D, n-3 fatty acids (FA) and Fe supplements during pregnancy and looked for any corresponding risk for celiac disease autoimmunity, or celiac disease, in their children. The study, known as The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young, or "TEDDY," prospectively followed from birth children with increased genetic risk. The team defines celiac disease autoimmunity as the presence of persistently positive tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies (tTGA). The TEDDY research team includes Jimin Yang, Roy N. Tamura, Carin A. Aronsson, Ulla M. Uusitalo, Åke Lernmark, Marian Rewers, William A. Hagopian, Jin-Xiong She, Jorma Toppari, Anette G. Ziegler, Beena Akolkar, Jeffrey P. Krischer, Jill M. Norris, Suvi M. Virtanen, and Daniel Agardh. For their study, the team enrolled 6,627 children with confirmed celiac disease. They confirmed celiac diagnosis either with biopsy results, and also included those with likely celiac, if they had persistently elevated levels of tTGA>100 AU. Of the 6,627 children originally enrolled, 1,136 developed celiac disease autoimmunity at a median 3·1 years of age (range 0·9–10) and 409 developed celiac disease at a median 3·9 years of age (range 1·2–11). The data showed that 66% of mothers used supplements containing vitamin D, 17% containing n-3 FA, and 94% containing iron, at 3–4 months postpartum. Over the entire pregnancy, mothers consumed an average total intake of 2,014 μg vitamin D (sd 2045 μg), 111 g n-3 FA (sd 303 g) and 8,806 mg Fe (sd 7,017 mg). After adjusting for country of residence, child's human leucocyte antigen genotype, sex, family history of celiac disease, any breast-feeding duration and household crowding, Cox's proportional hazard ratios showed no statistically significant association between the intake of vitamin D, n-3 FA or Fe, and risk for celiac disease autoimmunity or celiac disease. The use of dietary supplements during pregnancy may improve nutrition, but it is not likely to have any effect upon the risk for celiac disease in the offspring. Source: Cambridge.org The researchers in this study are variously associated with the Health Informatics Institute, Morsani College of Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, The Diabetes and Celiac Disease Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, 20502 Malmö, Sweden, Barbara Davis Center for Childhood Diabetes, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO, Pacific Northwest Diabetes Research Institute, Seattle, WA 98122, USA, the Center for Biotechnology and Genomic Medicine, Augusta University, Augusta, GA, the Department of Physiology, Institute of Biomedicine, University of Turku, Finland, the Department of Pediatrics, Turku University Hospital, 20520 Turku, Finland, the Institute of Diabetes Research, Helmholtz Zentrum München and Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, and Forschergruppe Diabetes e.V., 80804 Neuherberg, Germany, the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MA, the Department of Epidemiology, Colorado School of Public Health, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO, the Unit of Nutrition, National Institute for Health and Welfare, 00300 Helsinki, Finland, the Health Sciences Center, Center for Child Health Research, University of Tampere, Tampere University Hospital, 33521 Tampere, Finland, and the The Science Center, Pirkanmaa Hospital District, 33521 Tampere, Finland.
  7. Hi all, I am an exercise enthusiast and have been since high school (currently 31-female) diagnosed with celiac 3 yrs ago and find that I am very sensitive to working out too much. I would go to the gym every day if I knew I would feel good, but eventually I seem to either not eat enough or not the right things- get a bout of diarrhea (glutened or otherwise- I am now testing no dairy) and just get sore muscles-spasms, and super run down. The latest incidence of this I ended up with hand, foot and mouth (a virus usually only young kids get) and then a week after that a REALLY bad cold. So let's just say I haven't been hitting the gym! This might make me sounds like a meat head or gym rat but I'm really not, i used to work out more often than i do now, however I am currently in a pilates teacher training so i need to be more active than I have been in the last couple years. I am looking for feedback on any supplements- diet - lifestyle suggestions on how to avoid getting so run down. To be able to keep working out and pushing myself to reach new goals not to just end up sick in bed. I got a vegan meal replacement/protein powder that i have usually once a day with a banana and some coconut milk, usually take my prenatal vitamins still (if i have them why not? my boy is 16 months LOL), calcium magnesium, trying to take glutamine once a day, and occasionally when I remember some probiotics and gummy vitamin C/D. I am not vegan- just no gluten and for now no dairy. Any other suggestions?! -lj
  8. Celiac.com 10/02/2015 - Many people with celiac disease or gluten-intolerance take digestive enzymes, hoping for some protection against accidental gluten-contamination. Post-proline cutting enzymes have been shown to effectively degrade the immunogenic gluten peptides and have been proposed as oral supplements. Several existing digestive enzyme supplements also claim to aid in gluten degradation. However, not all gluten proteins are the same. The gluten proteins that are particularly active in triggering an adverse immune reaction in celiac disease are known as immunogenic 33-mer from α-gliadin and a 26-mer from γ-gliadin. So, how effective are currently available digestive enzyme supplements ineffective in breaking down these specific gliadins that triggers immune reactions in people with celiac disease? A team of researchers recently set out to determine the effectiveness of such existing enzyme supplements in comparison with a well characterized post-proline cutting enzyme, Prolyl EndoPeptidase from Aspergillus niger (AN-PEP). The research team included G.Janssen, C. Christis, Y. Kooy-Winkelaar, L. Edens, D. Smith, P. van Veelen, and F. Koning. They are variously affiliated with the Department of Immunohematology and Blood Transfusion at Leiden University Medical Centre in Leiden, The Netherlands, DSM Food Specialties, Delft, The Netherlands, and DSM Food Specialties in South Bend, Indiana, USA. For their study, the team subjected each of the five commercially available digestive enzyme supplements along with purified digestive enzymes to 1) enzyme assays and 2) mass spectrometric identification. Gluten epitope degradation was monitored by 1) R5 ELISA, 2) mass spectrometric analysis of the degradation products and 3) T cell proliferation assays. Their findings show that, due to the high proline content of gluten molecules, gastrointestinal proteases are unable to fully degrade them leaving large proline-rich gluten fragments intact, including an immunogenic 33-mer from α-gliadin and a 26-mer from γ-gliadin. Basically, none of the currently available digestive enzyme supplements are effective in degrading immunogenic gluten epitopes. This means that these enzymes are not likely to be helpful to people with celiac disease. Share your thoughts in our comments section below. Source: PLoS One. 2015 Jun 1;10(6):e0128065. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0128065. eCollection 2015.
  9. I have eliminated gluten from my diet. However, I was wondering if anyone has any recommendations for a colon cleanse or detox? I know there are plenty of colon cleanse products. It seems like it would be a good idea to use one to help clean out.
  10. We have a usually overpriced Shopko here in town, but I get my Planter's cashews there because they are the only ones who carry the BIG can. This morning I happened to look in their vitamin section and was blown away! They have their own brand of supplements. They make two lines, one called Shopko Naturals. "Contains no sugar, salt, dairy, yeast, wheat, gluten, corn, soy, preservatives, artificial colors or flavors." I've been paying $20 plus for vitamins at the health food store. These are $7.99!!! I grabbed some B12's and some biotins this morning but I'll be going back tonight for some D3, plus I'll see what else they have. I have also heard that grapeseed exract (NOT grapeFRUIT seed extract) is a very good anti-inflammatory supplement. I need that because I can't take asperin or NASAIDs. The only one at the health food store has corn. I hope Shopko has one. Anybody have any experience with grapeseed extract?
  11. Quick question about wheat grass and barley grass concentrate... Long story, short: I noticed "wheat grass concentrate" and "barley grass juice concentrate" as ingredients on a multi vitamins supplement I planned on buying (muscle pharm armor v). I reached out directly to the company and was told that this product IS GLUTEN FREE. Taking a risk, I purchased it. I have been taking the supplements for the past 5 days and haven't had any type of reaction. I'm a Celiac and I'm actually pretty sensitive to even the slightest CC. I've been living a strict gluten free lifestyle for almost 3 years now and I'm well aware of the yes/no controversy about these ingredients. I have never seen anyone with Celiac co-sign a product with wheat/barley grass, but yet I've had zero reactions after almost a full week. I'm wanting to know if anyone has: 1) Successfully used Muscle Pharm's "Armor V" with no issues 2) Successfully consumed wheat/barley grass [concentrate] The only explanation I can think of is that maybe this particular harvest of wheat/barley grass was grown the correct way that allows it to be deemed gluten-free... Or maybe that since this multi vitamin has soooo many ingredients, the amount of wheat/barley grass concentrate is so trivial that it's less than 20ppm? Really just looking for anyone with a similar experience. I said "long story, short" at the beginning of my post and now it's turned into "long story, longer." Thanks everyone!!
  12. Celiac.com 09/12/2013 - Good news for consumers of gluten-free foods and other products: The FDA's new standards for the labeling of gluten-free food and other products apply to all foods and products labeled gluten-free, including dietary supplements and vitamins. The FDA rules state that any product declaring the contents to be "gluten-free," "no gluten," "free of gluten" or "without gluten," must meet all parts of FDA's gluten-free definition, including the requirement that the food contains less than 20 parts per million of gluten. People with celiac disease who consume gluten from wheat, rye, or barley risk gradual damage to the intestines, leading to poor absorption of vitamins and minerals and leading to a host of other health problems, including nutritional deficiencies, osteoporosis, miscarriages, and cancer," according to Virginia Cox, Associate Commissioner of FDA's Office of External Affairs. Creating uniform rules and conditions for the use of the term 'gluten-free' in the labeling of foods and other products is "necessary to ensure that individuals with celiac disease are not misled and are provided with truthful and accurate information with respect to foods so labeled, " according to the text of the final rule, which was published last week in the Federal Register. FDA projects the new requirements will yield annual health benefits of roughly $110 million, compared to estimated annual costs (related to testing and relabeling) of $7 million. Manufacturers of gluten-free foods and products will have one year to comply with the FDA's labeling requirements. Source: http://www.naturalproductsinsider.com/news/2013/08/fda-gluten-free-definition-applies-to-dietary-sup.aspx
  13. Celiac.com 11/02/2011 - With the rise in celiac disease diagnoses, increasing awareness of gluten-free issues, and an explosion of gluten-free related products, it is no surprise that supplements claiming to break down gluten would find their way onto the market. In fact, a number of supplements currently on the market claim to do just that: to break down gluten after it has been consumed. Are these claims accurate? Are these products in any way helpful for people following a gluten-free diet? Finally, do these supplements offer a safe alternative to a gluten-free diet for people who suffer from celiac disease and/or gluten-sensitivity? For example, GlutenEase, made by Enzymedica Inc., contains a blend of enzymes, including amylase, glucoamylase and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DDP-IV) — that are intended to "digest both gluten and casein, a protein found in milk," according to the company. The website for GlutenEase says that the supplement can "support" people who have trouble digesting gluten. However, and most importantly, the site says that GlutenEase is "not formulated" for people with celiac disease. Gluten Defense, made by Enzymatic Therapy Inc., contains a similar blend of enzymes that includes DDP-IV, lactase and amylase. The site for Gluten Defense says the product is "specifically formulated to defend against hidden gluten" that can cause gas, bloating and indigestion. But what does that mean? Does that mean that taking the supplement might offer people with celiac disease some extra protection against accidental gluten contamination? That seems doubtful, and unproven from a scientific standpoint. Unlike GlutenEase, Gluten Defense offers no specific disclaimer for people with celiac disease. There is also no claim that the product is safe, or in any way formulated for people with celiac disease. Dave Barton, whose title is "Director of Education" for Enzymedica, claims that many people who say they have celiac disease see improvement when taking product, and that some even manage to begin eating wheat again. However, Barton is quick to warn consumers that there's "no way to guarantee that it would break down 100% of gluten proteins." But that's the problem isn't it? It would need to break down nearly all of the gluten proteins in order for those proteins to not cause damage to the person with celiac disease. The fact is that these enzyme supplements may break down a few molecules of gluten protein, but no supplement exists that will make it safe for people with celiac disease to eat gluten again. According to Dr. Stefano Guandalini, professor of pediatrics and director of the University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center, "[t]he amount of gluten that these would be able to digest is ridiculously low. For people with celiac disease, these are something to completely avoid." Dr. Peter Green, director of the Columbia University's Celiac Disease Center, agrees that current enzyme supplements would digest only a small percentage of gluten molecules. However, Green adds, the basic concept is sound. Pharmaceutical companies are spending hundreds of millions of dollars to create an enzyme-based drug that would permit people with celiac disease to consume gluten. However, Green points out, the companies wouldn't be spending that money if a successful over-the-counter alternative already existed. Bottom line: Enzymes currently claiming to help break down gluten protein will not permit people with celiac disease to safely consume products made with wheat, rye or barley. Any benefit these enzymes may provide for people with celiac disease is strictly theoretical, and likely minimal at best. A completely gluten-free diet is currently the only proven treatment for celiac disease. Talk with your doctor before making any changes to your gluten-free diet for celiac disease treatment. Source: http://www.latimes.com/health/la-he-skeptic-gluten-supplements-20110926,0,2998711.story
  14. Hello, I recently just joined and find this forum to be very helpful. After two long years of all sorts of weird issues (joint pain, numbness and tingling, acid reflux) and thousands of dollars in medical bills with no answers for my symptoms turns out about 3 weeks ago monday my biopsy and blood test came back positive for Celiac Disease.. FINALLY looks like i may have an answer. Long story short my doctor is having me take Nutrametrix supplements ( ORAC, OPC-3, B-Complex, Might-a-mins, Aloe Vera Juice, and a Probiotic) To treat the nausea and burning sensation in my gut. Have any of you taken these supplements? Have they helped you? ORAC OPC-3 2x daily empty stomach Activated-B Complex Nutriclean Probiotic 2x daily before meals Might-a-mins after/or before meals or PRN (as needed) Aloe Juice natural flavor 2oz 4-5x as PRN
  15. My daughter, diagnosed celiac in November, so gluten free nearly two months now, is having a hard time no matter what she eats. She has a tremendous amount of damage - seen on her endoscopy / colonoscopy - and her GI told us that it will take 6 months to a year for her body to heal. My question is what have are you taking to promote healing? I would like to add digestive enzymes, more probiotics (currently she eats yogurt and drinks kefir), and maybe Vitamin C in addition to the multivitamins she takes. What has worked for you? I can't stand watching her suffer after eating for a year! I know that we probably need to cut out the dairy, but she is very resistant to this. For those of you who have cut out milk, do you have an easier time with cheeses? I am open to suggestions and trying to learn -- all of this is still quite new to us.
  16. aquaholical

    Supplements

    I've found out the hard way that I am SUPER SUPER SUPER sensitive and I really need to take a bunch of supplements/vitamins for another health condition. Where do you get your supplements? What are the safest brands?
  17. I am newly diagnosed (1 month). I am iron deficient, as well as all the regular deficiencies Celiacs have. My dilemma is iron supplements cause constipation and that is what I am trying to get rid of. I just want to be "regular." My doctor advised me to wait to take iron until I am "regular" and take a multi vitamin, vitamin D, and Calcium. But I am worried about the iron. I am so tired and borderline anemic. I think iron would help, right? Any suggestions?
  18. I have always been a little unsure what to think of probiotics. My mother raised me to take acidophilus supplements religiously, but I could never find any evidence to suggest that the pills actually improved my health. After two weeks taking Vidazorb Super C Chewable Probiotics, I think I have my first substantial evidence that probiotics actually do something. At first, I didn't notice much change, but about a week after I started taking the chewable tablets, I realized that it had been a while since I had suffered indigestion. Prior to this, at least a meal or two a week just wouldn't sit right in my stomach. I have no known allergies or sensitivities, and it didn't seem like I was responding to any particular ingredients, just every now and then, my stomach would seem to not like something I ate. I don't know what was going on, but in the two weeks (and counting) I've been taking Vidazorb Super C Chewable Probiotics, I haven't had indigestion problems once. Additionally, I seem to be getting acid reflux less as well (I usually get that at least a few times a week). I am very happy with the results I've gotten from Vidazorb Super C Chewable Probiotics. The fact that they're chewable (and actually taste pretty decent), calorie-free and non-refrigerated makes them fit easily into my daily routine. I highly recommend them to anyone hoping to improve their digestive health. For more information, visit their website. Use coupon code "CELIAC" for 20% off through 9/30/12! Note: Articles that appear in the "Gluten-Free Food Reviews" section of this site are paid advertisements. For more information about this see our Advertising Page.
  19. Celiac.com 03/10/2009 - A recent study confirms that B-vitamin supplements are helpful in raising vitamin B6, B12 and folate levels and in reducing homocysteine levels in people with celiac disease. Celiac disease is a typical malabsorption syndrome, and is associated with higher rates of numerous deficiencies, including folate and vitamin B12. People with celiac disease face higher rates of Hyperhomocysteinemia than do healthy controls. A team of Dutch researchers led by Dr. Muhammed Hadithi recently set out to evaluate the efficacy of daily supplements of vitamin B6, B12 and folate on homocysteine levels in patients with celiac disease. The study measured levels of vitamin B6, folate, vitamin B12, and fasting plasma homocysteine in 51 adults with celiac disease and 50 healthy control subjects of similar age and sex. The results show that the celiac disease subjects who used vitamin supplements had higher blood levels of vitamin B6 (P = 0.003), folate (P < 0.001), and vitamin B12 (P = 0.012) than celiac patients who did not use supplements, or healthy controls (P = 0.035, P < 0.001, P = 0.007, for vitamin B6, folate, and vitamin B12, respectively). Patients who use vitamin supplements also showed lower levels of plasma homocysteine than in patients who did not (P = 0.001) or healthy controls (P = 0.003). Vitamin B6 and folate were both associated with homocysteine levels, whereas vitamin B12 was not. Twenty-four (48%) of 50 controls and 23 (50%) of 46 of the celiac disease patients carried the MTHFR thermolabile variant T-allele (P = 0.89). The research team concludes that Homocysteine levels are dependent on Marsh classification and the regular use of B-vitamin supplements reduces of homocysteine levels in patients with celiac disease.The study confirms earlier studies suggesting that both the presence and severity of celiac disease determined homocysteine levels. The regular use of supplemental B vitamins resulted in higher levels of serum vitamin B6, folate, vitamin B12 and lower levels of plasma homocysteine in patients with celiac disease. Moreover, supplemental B vitamins seem to offer protection against the effects of villous atrophy on homocysteine levels, independent of the genetic susceptibility status as determined by carriage of the C677T polymorphism of 5,10 methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase. World J Gastroenterol. 2009;15:955–960
  20. Celiac.com 06/18/2010 - One of the conditions associated with celiac disease is called exocrine pancreatic insufficiency. A previous study showed that exocrine pancreatic insufficiency is the trigger for about one in three (20/66) cases of current or persistent diarrhea in adults with celiac disease. Of these 20 patients, 19 showed initial improvement with pancreatic supplementation. However, at this point, there are no longitudinal studies on exocrine pancreatic insufficiency in the medical literature. A research team set out to rectify that by conducting their own longitudinal study. The team included Kate E. Evans, John S. Leeds, Stephen Morley, and David S. Sanders. Over the next four years, the team conducted prospective follow-up checks on the 20 patients who received therapy for exocrine pancreatic insufficiency. The team assessed gastrointestinal symptoms, dietary adherence, celiac antibody status, and dose of enzyme supplementation. They repeated titters for fecal elastase-1 (Fel-1) to reassess exocrine pancreatic function. The team was able to review 19 of the 20 patients; one patient had died. The group averaged 59.7 years of age. Seven subjects were male. On average, patients suffered from celiac disease for 13.2 years. Eleven out of nineteen patients continued on enzyme supplementation, with average doses of 45,000 units of lipase per day. Only one of the eleven patients reported no reduction in symptoms, while eight of the 19 patients had discontinued the supplements after their diarrhea abated. The entire group showed a substantial increase in Fel-1 levels over time, with median values of 90 lg/g at zero months, 212 lg/g at six months, and 365 lg/g at follow-up of 45–66 months (p/0.0001). Fecal elastase-1 is helpful in spotting exocrine pancreatic insufficiency in adult celiac patients with diarrhea. Results of the team's longitudinal survey indicate that that patients with celiac disease can end pancreatic enzyme supplementation as symptoms improve. Source: Dig Dis Sci. DOI 10.1007/s10620-010-1261-y
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