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  1. Celiac.com 07/06/2018 - I had the chance to road trip through Texas. It’s an awfully large state, and there is a lot to see, eat and appreciate. I was surprised by the amount of amazing food I was able to consume without concern of cross contamination. I had the opportunity to visit Dallas, Houston, San Antonio and Austin. I compiled a list of my favorite options from each city. Dallas Company Cafe (2104 Greenville Avenue, Dallas, TX 75206) Ladies and Gentleman, I finally got to eat some DELICIOUS fried chicken and couldn’t have been happier. I also had their version of french toast bites, which tasted a million times better than what I remembered. A 100% gluten free restaurant and bakery. Everything we ate here melted in our mouths. We got to meet the owners, and hear their story, which made the food taste all of the more better. Let them know if you have any dairy allergies, and they will be happy to accomodate you. Also be mindful of their hours, as they are open everyday but only for brunch. Hopefully they expand to San Diego soon, fingers crossed! Back Home BBQ (5014 Ross Ave., Dallas, TX 75206) Back Home BBQ’s Smoked Meat Selection: Sliced Brisket, Sausage and Smoked Chicken Brought to you by the same owners of Company Cafe. It’s not 100% gluten free, but the BBQ is, as is the cornbread and pecan pie. Authentic BBQ delicious that is safe to eat (yeehaw). HG Sply Co. (2008 Greenville Ave, Dallas, TX 75206) A restaurant where ALL items can be made dairy and/or gluten free. Yaaaasss! We ordered and absolutely loved the HG Chips and Queso (cashew cheese), Beet Poke (actually tastes like you’re eating fish because of the white seaweed), the curried sweet potato soup and Pulled Pork Tacos. They have a second location in Fort Worth. Houston Pondicheri / Pondicheri Bake Lab - Upstairs (2800 Kirby Dr B132, Houston, TX 77098) Pondicheri’s Gluten Free Avocado Dosa Indian, GF and vegan option deliciousness! Chickpea Masala fried chicken… Yes, this is real life. They have a restaurant downstairs, open during specific hours. While their upstairs cafe and bakery is open all day, it has a different menu, as well as enough interesting GF baked goods (like honey mesquite cake) to fill your heart’s desire. They also sell Indian spices, ghee and other fun supplies in their small shop. Be sure to check out India1948 for recipes, their online store and cooking classes. In case you’re wondering, they have NY location. True Food Kitchen (1700 Post Oak Blvd, Houston, TX 77056) True Food’s Strawberry & Rhubarb Crisp: almond crumble, chia seed, vanilla ice cream I truly love this place, and it’s no wonder they now have so many locations in the USA. They are known to have a health conscious, organic, and seasonal menu. Although not 100% gluten free, they use all separate equipment if you are Celiac, or have other food allergies. I feel safe and satisfied each time I eat there. My favorite? A side of their gluten-free pita to dip in their ponzu sauce, and their almond ricotta pizza. Now, wait until you try one of their seasonal desserts, with a side of their homemade coconut ice cream. Sign up for their birthday list, and get one for free. You’re welcome. San Antonio 5 Points Local (1017 North Flores, San Antonio, TX 78212) Karma Bowl (v): Fluffy quinoa, roasted rosemary sweet potatoes, whole black beans, fresh kale salad, and drizzled with our chipotle cashew crema aka "Kitchen Crack" An organic, 100% gluten free restaurant, serving ingredients that are all consciously sourced. They cater to all types of diets, and are consistent in tasting delicious. I recommend any of their bowls, and fluffy pancakes. They also have a yoga studio and school attached! Can’t get any cooler. Green Vegetarian Cuisine (200 E Grayson St #120, San Antonio, TX 78215) Since most restaurants in San Antonio are closed on Mondays (still not entirely sure why), this was a great option for us. Located in the very hip Pearl Brewery District, this is a fun little vegan restaurant with gluten-free options. I was quite happy with my nachos and enchiladas (the plates are huge FYI), and cupcake. The best part of our experience, was our waiter, Heath. He made the experience a lot of fun. Parking in the lot there allows you to explore the river walk a bit, which we loved. They have a another location in San Antonio, and one in Houston. Larder Coffee (Hotel Emma, 136 E. Grayson, San Antonio, TX 78215) Larder’s gluten Free Avocado Toast with house smoked salmon. And their Gluten Free Bagel with cream cheese, housemade jam and strawberries. This is attached to my new favorite hotel, Hotel Emma, also located inside hip Pearl Brewery District. It is an adorable coffee shop, that serves many dairy alternative options, and gluten free toasts and treats. There is also a small market inside. Be sure to check out the bar area right next door, and the hotel, which has the coolest architecture. P.S. They also have a restaurant attached with Gluten Free options, called Supper. Austin Picnik (4801 Burnet Rd, Austin, TX 78756) Picnik’s Chicken Tenders: Rice flour tempura, honey-mustard aioli. Available at their brick-and-mortar restaurant on Burnet Road. Our friend half-joked when she said she moved to Austin from LA because of this restaurant… I now can understand how that might be a real thing. They are 100% gluten, corn, soy and peanut free. The food is just, wow, and can be modified to fit most dietary restrictions. Did we visit twice in less than 24 hours? Yes. The chicken tenders aren’t like anything else, and I would recommend ordering at least two orders to start off with, including two of their honey aioli sides. They also have a couple grab and go trailers in Austin. Wild Wood Bakehouse (3016 Guadalupe St., Ste. 200 Austin, Texas 78705) Another great 100% gluten free restaurant and bakery. They serve some yummy comfort food, like fried calamari and chips, chicken and waffles, biscuits, sausage and bakery. Did I mention their amazing bakery? A mountain of gluten free options. Thanks for treating me well Texas...until we meet (I mean eat) again. As Always, Buen Camino
  2. -This post was made on February 2, 2014. If you are reading this a few years down the road, please re-check gluten-free info with the company.- If you live in the Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas, Kansas, or Missouri, you may know about Braum's. (Burger place that serves ice cream and has a grocery side to it-all the dairy is made at their own farm in OK) And I grew up with Braums, so good! I miss their burgers. Everything is great quality. Obviously the restaurant side isn't going to offer too much at a burger and fry kind of place, but they have a grocery side where they sell a little bit of everything and have really good quality products, milk and ice cream, and groceries. We went in there the other day, and I usually go in and get the soft serve frozen yogurt in a cup while I oogle at the sundaes that are scooped with a shared scoop as the gluten containing ice creams, but as I was walking out I saw a HUGE SECTION OF gluten-free PRODUCTS in the grocery area!!!!! They had a ton of Udis stuff (more than any other store around here), King arthur flour and chebe mixes, some glutino stuff, and a few other things. At really good prices, to boot. $2.99 for Chebe mixes impressed me-Usually at least $3.70 around here. They sell some meat, fruit, milk and cheese-things that are naturally gluten-free, but they also have a few other things like dips and such that I am not sure of, so I wrote them today to ask about gluten-free stuff on the grocery side, labeling practices, and went ahead and threw in the "anything I can eat in the restaurant?" question. The only thing addressing gluten on their website says gluten containing ingredients will be listed prominently on ice creams (which they have a bunch) and any ice cream that doesn't have gluten containing ingredients in it is safe. I will definitely be stopping in here often, so I wanted to spread the word since, to me, it was so unexpected and decent prices. I have only been to the one local one near me which is newer and larger, so I have no idea if this was a chain-wide rollout but with the prices I think it may be. I will share any additional information I get when they hopefully write me back!
  3. Where can I find the largest gluten-free bread selection in the Houston area? Better yet, are there any places that carry more than 1 or 2 brands closer to Katy/ west of Houston?
  4. The following report comes to us from The Sprue-Nik Press, which is published by the Tri-County Celiac Sprue Support Group, a chapter of CSA/USA, Inc. serving southeastern Michigan (Volume 7, Number 6, September 1998). The degree of mucosal damage varies from one celiac patient to another. Also, the amount of the small intestine that is affected also varies, with the damage usually progressing from the beginning of the small intestine and then moving downward toward the end of the small intestine. This may explain the variable symptoms in different patients. For example, when a significant portion of the small intestine is involved, diarrhea, malabsorption, and weight loss result. When damage is isolated to only the top portion of the small intestine, the only affect may be iron deficiency. (Incidentally, when iron deficiency is not corrected by iron supplements, it is highly likely that celiac disease is the cause of the deficiency.) Gluten in a celiacs diet causes the immune system to produce gliadin antibodies in the intestine. Some of these leak into the bloodstream where they can be detected in blood tests. These blood tests are useful for screening for celiac disease, though a small intestinal biopsy remains the gold standard for diagnosing celiac disease (celiac disease). There are few diseases for which diet and nutritional issues are more important than for celiac disease. At this time, the only known treatment of celiac disease is the removal of wheat, barley, rye, and oats from the celiacs diet. On the surface this sounds simple, but complete removal of dietary gluten can be very difficult. Gluten-containing grains are ubiquitous in the Western diet. Also, grain-derived food additives such as partially hydrolyzed vegetable protein [and modified food starch] are widely used in processed foods and oral medications. Content labels are often vague or incomplete regarding these additives. What further complicates matters is a lack of significant experience on the part of physicians and dietitians in the dietary treatment of celiac disease. This is mainly because there are so few celiac patients for anyone practitioner. Therefore the best sources of dietary information for a new patient are other knowledgeable, more experienced celiacs. It is very important that the diet be followed with full and strict compliance. Celiacs, especially if theyve had active celiac disease for a longtime, are at higher than normal risk for GI malignancies.(Fortunately, compliance to a good gluten-free diet returns the risk of malignancy and life expectancy to that of the general population.)Another complication of long-term untreated celiac disease is bone loss, which maybe irreversible in older patients. When a large portion of the small intestine is affected by active celiac disease, the result can be a generalized malabsorption problem, resulting in deficiencies of water- and fat-soluble vitamins and minerals. Folic acid deficiency is particularly common in celiac disease because, like iron, it is absorbed in the upper small intestine [where the highest concentration of celiac-related damage generally occurs]. Folic acid is necessary for DNA replication, which occurs in cell turnover. So a deficiency of folic acid can impair the regenerative ability of the small intestine. Vitamin B12, also essential to DNA synthesis, is not malabsorbed as commonly as folic acid. Magnesium and calcium deficiency are also common in active celiac disease, because of decreased intestinal absorption AND because these minerals tend to bind with malabsorbed fat which passes through the system. It is particularly important for doctors to assess the magnesium status of celiacs, because without correction of a magnesium deficiency, low levels of calcium and potassium in the blood cannot usually be corrected with supplements. In severe cases, magnesium supplementation should be done intravenously because of the tendency of oral magnesium to cause diarrhea. Supplemental calcium generally should be provided to celiacs, possibly with vitamin D, to help restore tissue and bone calcium levels to normal. The exact dose of calcium is not known. Dr. Fine usually recommends 1500-2000 mg of elemental calcium per day, divided into two doses, for several years and sometimes indefinitely. [4], [5], [6] Zinc is another mineral that often becomes depleted in patients with chronic malabsorption. Zinc supplementation (usually the RDA via multi-vitamin and mineral supplements) helps avoid skin rashes and restores normal taste. Up to 20% of celiacs will continue to experience loose or watery stools even after going on a gluten-free diet. Sometimes this is due to inadvertent gluten in the diet, but a recent study at Dr. Fines medical center showed that in these cases other diseases epidemiologically associated with celiac disease are present.[7] These include microscopic colitis, exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, lactose intolerance, selective IgA deficiency, hypo- or hyperthyroidism, and Type I diabetes mellitus. When diarrhea continues after beginning a gluten-free diet, a search for these associated diseases or others should be undertaken and treated if found. The use of cortico steroids has been advocated in celiacs when the response to the gluten-free diet is sluggish or absent. This is necessary more often in older than in younger patients. However, pancreatic enzyme supplements (prescribed by a doctor) may be needed to help digestion and resolve ongoing malabsorption in some patients. The endomysial antibody blood test is highly accurate and specific for detecting celiac disease. However, the current method of detecting these antibodies involves an operator looking through a microscope and observing the antibody binding on monkey esophagus or human umbilical cord tissue substrates. The correct interpretation of results is highly dependent on the skill and experience of the technician interpreting the fluorescence pattern through the microscope. Moreover, determination of the amount of antibody present relies upon repeat examinations following dilutions of the blood serum, with the last positive test being reported as a titer. A new discovery was reported by a research group in Germany.[8] The antigen substrate of the endomysial antibodies has been identified. This allows the development of a new test that can detect and measure serum endomysial antibodies in one, chemically-based test run [thus greatly reducing the potential for human error and significantly reducing the time needed for each test--ed.] These new tests should be available for clinical use shortly. In a recent study, Dr. Fine found that the frequency of positive stool blood tests was greater in patients with total villous atrophy relative to partial villous atrophy, and all tests were negative in treated patients without villous atrophy.[9] This suggests that fecal occult blood may be a non-invasive and inexpensive method of following the response of the damaged intestine to treatment. Also, it should be noted that the high frequency of positive tests due to villous atrophy will decrease the accuracy of the tests when used for cancer screening in this same patient population (which is how these tests are normally used by health care providers). There have been two recent reports touting the lack of deleterious effects when 50 grams of oats per day are added to the diet of celiac patients. Although this finding is exciting for celiacs, both studies possess certain limitations. In the first study, published by a Finnish group, the exclusion criteria for symptoms and histopathology were somewhat strict, so that patients with more mild forms of celiac disease seemingly were selected for study. And though no damage to duodenal histology occurred after one year of oats consumption, no physiologic or immunologic parameters of disease activity were measured. Furthermore, several patients in the treatment group dropped out of the study for reasons not mentioned in the article.[10] The second and more recent study involved only 10 patients, studied for twelve weeks. The favorable results of this study must be interpreted with caution because of the small sample size and short study period.[11] Even the one-year treatment period in the Finnish study may be too short to observe a harmful effect, as it is known that small intestinal damage sometimes will not occur for several years following there introduction of gluten to a treated celiac. At the worst, an increase in the incidence of malignancy may result from chronic ingestion of oats, an effect that could take decades to manifest. Therefore, this issue will require further study before oats can be recommended for the celiac diet. 3. From the September 1998 newsletter of the Houston Celiac-Sprue Support Group, a chapter of CSA/USA, Inc. 4. Ciacci C, Maurelli L, et el, Effects of dietary treatment on bone mineral density in adults with celiac disease; factors predicting response, Am J Gastroenterol, 1997; 92 (6): 992-996. 5. Mautalen C, Gonzalez D, et al, Effect of treatment on bone mass, mineral metabolism, and body composition in untreated celiac patients, Am J Gastroenterol, 1997; 2 (2):313-318. 6. Corazza gluten-free, Di Sario A, et al, Influence of pattern of clinical presentation and of gluten-free diet on bone mass and metabolism in adult coeliac disease, Bone, 1996; 18 (6):525-530. 7. Fine, KD, Meyer RL, Lee EL, The prevalence and causes of chronic diarrhea in patients with celiac sprue treated with a gluten-free diet, Gastroenterol, 1997; 112 (6):1830-1838. 8. Dieterich W, Ehnis T, et al, Identification of tissue transglutaminase as the autoantigen of celiac disease, Nat Med, 1997; 3 (7):797-801. 9. Fine KD, The prevalence of occult gastrointestinal bleeding in celiac sprue, N Engl J Med, 1996; 334 (18):1163-1167. 10. Janatuinen EK, Pikkarainen PH, et al, A comparison of diets with and without oats in adults with celiac disease, N Engl J Med, 1995; 333 (16):1033-1037. 11. Srinivasan U, Leonard N, et al, Absence of oats toxicity in adult coeliac disease, BMJ, 1996; 313 (7068):1300-1301.
  5. This recipe comes to us from Clare Scheffer. Cake: 1 cup butter 1 cup water 2 cups gluten-free flour mix 2 cups sugar 2 eggs beaten ½ cup gluten-free sour cream 1 teaspoon gluten-free almond extract 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon baking soda ¼ teaspoon baking powder 2 teaspoons xanthan gum Frosting: ½ cup butter ¼ cup milk 4 ½ cups powered sugar ½ teaspoon almond extract Directions: In a large saucepan, bring butter and water to a boil. Remove from heat; whisk in remaining cake ingredients until smooth. Pour into greased 15 x 10 x 1 inch baking pan (jelly roll pan). Bake at 375F for 20-22 minutes or until cake is golden brown and tests done. Cool for 20 minutes. Meanwhile, for frosting, combine milk and butter in a medium saucepan and bring to a boil. Remove from heat. Add sugar and almond extract. Mix well. Spread over warm cake.
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