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Found 17 results

  1. Celiac.com 11/18/2016 - With your local grocer carrying more gluten-free products then ever before, preparing a great gluten-free Thanksgiving has never been easier. If you plan on using pre-made, or packaged items for your dinner, then be sure to read labels and make certain your choices are gluten-free. If you are preparing a meal at home, make sure the turkey you buy is gluten-free. Not all brands of turkey are gluten-free. Some contain gluten in their additives, and some birds are treated with various flavorings or rubs, and may not be gluten-free, so double check. Also, be very careful about any seasoning or gravy packets that come with otherwise gluten-free turkeys. If you're not sure, check the ingredients, and use our Gluten-Free Ingredient Lists to help you shop. There other gluten-free brands, but be sure to check with your local store and read labels to be sure your turkey is gluten-free. Here's a helpful list of gluten-free turkey brands from our online forum. Next, make great gluten-free gravy with Celiac.com's delicious gluten-free gravy recipe. Remember, some bouillon cubes contain gluten, so be sure to use gluten-free bouillon cubes. Tip: Thicken your homemade gravy with either corn starch or arrowroot flour. This recipe makes a rich, savory gravy that will have your guests coming back for more. This recipe makes enough gravy to serve about eight to ten people. Gluten-Free Savory Gravy Ingredients: 1 pound turkey giblets and neck 1½ quarts gluten-free chicken stock 2 carrots, chopped 1 stalk celery, chopped 2 cups water 1½ cups pan drippings from roasted turkey 4 tablespoons of corn starch, adjusted as needed 2 tablespoons tomato paste 2 tablespoons cranberry sauce Salt and ground black pepper to taste Note: One tablespoon corn starch (¼ ounce) thickens one cup of liquid Preparation: While the turkey is roasting, place the turkey giblets and neck into a large saucepan with the carrots, celery, water, and chicken stock. Bring to a boil over medium heat, skim off any foam that rises to the top, reduce heat to low, and simmer the stock for 3 hours. Skim off the fat, strain the stock, and set aside. There should be about 4 cups of stock. Take carrots and celery and press through a strainer. Spoon strained carrots and celery into the stock and stir. Skim off and discard all but ¼ cup of the fat from the drippings in the roasting pan, and place the roasting pan over medium heat. Whisk in the corn starch, then heat and stir the corn starch mixture until it becomes pale golden brown, about 5 minutes. To avoid lumps, mix the starch with an equal amount of cold liquid until it forms a paste, then whisk it into the liquid you're trying to thicken. Once the thickener is added, cook it briefly to remove any starchy flavor. Don't overcook. Whisk in the stock and tomato paste; bring to a boil, simmer for 5 minutes, then whisk in the cranberry sauce. Simmer for 10 more minutes. Season to taste with salt and black pepper. Best Ever Gluten-Free Stuffing Recipe Make sure you prepare gluten-free stuffing. Try Celiac.com's Best Ever Gluten-free Stuffing Recipe. Ingredients: 5-6 cups gluten-free bread (about 2 loaves), cut into one-inch cubes, toasted and cooled 2 tablespoons olive oil 3 cups celery, chopped 1 large yellow onion, chopped 1 tablespoon fresh thyme, finely chopped 1 tablespoon fresh sage, finely chopped 1-2 teaspoons fresh rosemary, finely chopped 1-2 cups gluten-free chicken broth 1 egg yolk 1 teaspoon salt ½ teaspoon pepper Directions: Sauté the onion and celery in olive oil on medium-low heat until clear. Stir in the rosemary, sage, and thyme, and cook two more minutes, until the aroma of the herbs fills the air. Bring the chicken stock to boil on high heat. Place the egg yolk in a medium-sized bowl and carefully spoon two or three ounces of the chicken stock into the egg yolk, slowly, while whisking the mixture. Add the rest of the chicken stock to the egg mixture. Note: Blending a small amount of stock into the egg first will prevent scrambled eggs. Add the cooled celery, onion, and herbs mixture into the stock and egg mixture. Toss the bread cubes into this mixture and coat thoroughly. Add the salt and pepper and toss bread a bit more. Place all of this into a greased casserole dish (big enough to hold three quarts) and cover it with aluminum foil. Place in 400°F oven for 40-50 min, covering as needed with aluminum foil, until done. Insert a toothpick into the stuffing. If it comes out clean, the stuffing is done. If not, bake until the toothpick comes out clean. If you want to cook the stuffing inside the turkey add only 1 cup of chicken broth. Serves six to eight people, depending on their appetite for stuffing. Thanksgiving Gluten-free Pumpkin Pie Lastly, prepare winning gluten-free desserts, such as: Celiac.com's Best Ever Gluten-free Pumpkin Pie Recipe (Adapted from Libby's Original Pumpkin Pie Recipe) Ingredients: ¾ cup granulated sugar 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon ½ teaspoon salt ½ teaspoon ground ginger ¼ teaspoon ground cloves 2 large eggs 1 can (15 oz.) Libby's 100% Pure Pumpkin (Yes, it's gluten-free!) 1 can (12 fl. oz.) Evaporated Milk 1 unbaked 9-inch (4-cup volume) deep-dish pie shell Whipped cream (as desired) Directions: MIX sugar, cinnamon, salt, ginger and cloves in small bowl. Beat eggs in large bowl. Stir in pumpkin and sugar-spice mixture. Gradually stir in evaporated milk. POUR into gluten-free pie shell. BAKE in preheated 425° F oven for 15 minutes. Reduce temperature to 350° F; bake for 40 to 50 minutes or until knife inserted near center comes out clean. Cool on wire rack for 2 hours. Serve immediately or refrigerate. Top with whipped cream before serving. For more great gluten-free sides, desserts, and more, be sure to consult Celiac.com's Gluten-free Recipes list. For even more ideas, check Celiac.com's previous Gluten-free Thanksgiving and Holiday Guides from years past: Gluten-free Thanksgiving 2014 Gluten-free Thanksgiving 2013 Gluten-free Thanksgiving 2010 Gluten-free Thanksgiving 2009
  2. I thought it might be fun to share some favorite gluten-free Thanksgiving favorites. Or ask for help making an old favorite from BC ( before Celiac) into a gluten-free recipe. Or maybe you have found a new recipe you are going to try and would like to share?
  3. Celiac.com 02/02/2016 - Thanksgiving dinner is one of the culinary highlights of the year. Family and friends join together to share a blessed moment when they give thanks for each other and for homes, jobs, and the opportunity to live comfortable lives. We may give thanks for peace, decent weather, surviving illness, or just making it through another day. This is all done around the celebration of a food feast. Food is of central importance to social bonding and sharing a sense of community. As we all eat from the same platters and serve from the same bowls, there is a one-ness, a unity between us. But for folks who have celiac or who can't eat gluten, there is a sense of exclusion when relegated to a "separate but equal" dining system. People who have no problem eating anything and everything often fail to consider how hard it is for people who need to be super-careful about what they consume. When they have gone to great expense to buy festive foods, and after they've expended significant time planning the perfect plates, it is understandable that they get frustrated when others won't eat what they've prepared. What they may not remember is that there is a big difference between "won't" and "can't". Will-not implies a preference—and in food-terms it means wrinkling up your nose over something that doesn't strike your fancy. Can-not implies the hard truth that if one eats something, they could get sick. Won't is a choice—can't occurs when there is no choice. So when people do not eat a festive food, is it because they can't or won't? The usual default is to assume won't. But for people who are gluten-free, the answer is can't. Going gluten-free at Thanksgiving can be tough because it's so keenly associated with memories. Some of them are sensory, like remembering the smells of fresh-baked pumpkin pie or roasted turkey wafting out of the oven. Others are emotional, such as laughing with grandma while kneading bread that they family will soon lunge to smother with melting butter, or chopping up onions, celery, and chestnuts for dressing with Aunt Molly. For folks who once weren't gluten-free, certain foods evoke desire. We all have emotional trigger-foods. What's yours? One year we were invited to a colleague's Thanksgiving dinner and the hostess asked everyone, "What is the one food that if you don't have it for Thanksgiving, you would feel sad about?" It was a thoughtful question. After we all confessed she then told us that was the item we were to bring. When you're going to a pot-luck type of Thanksgiving dinner where everyone is bringing something, it's dietary roulette for someone with celiac. It's gambling at its finest. What are the chances that you can eat a dish? Does the cook appear conscientious and trustworthy or make you ask "am I feeling lucky?" enough to try that dish? Eating in collective settings lowers the risk of getting glutened when everyone knows you've got dietary issues and they're openly attentive to them. The risk is greater when you're with people you don't know well, or those who aren't as careful as they seem. Culinary posers prevail during the holidays. Some stop at the deli and put the food into their own bowls and cover them with aluminum foil to make it appear they made it themselves (I know—I have in fact done this). We have no idea what's really in the food because we didn't make it ourselves. Others lie about the dish's ingredients. They may innocently fib because they don't know what's safe and what's not for someone who has to go gluten-free—or they could tell only partial truth, like I did long ago about whether I put cream in a pumpkin soup when someone was lactose intolerant. Back then, I wrongly assumed that if they didn't know, they couldn't tell, so they wouldn't put up a fuss and then I wouldn't get embarrassed. I didn't know then what I know now. Even well-intended people may screw up when it comes to telling the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth about what's in food or how it was prepared. Preparing a gluten-free Thanksgiving dinner that is absolutely safe and delicious for everyone to eat is easy. Here's a menu and recipes that will help you to create a meal that everyone is thankful for! It focuses on foods of the season, especially apples and the family of squashes. It is inclusive and delicious, and will give everyone one less thing to worry about as we instead focus on gratitude. A Gluten-Free Thanksgiving Dinner Menu Appetizer When folks are milling around before a meal, it's nice to put out appetizers that they can nibble on. Usually these are very sharable, so making sure they are safe for someone with celiac is essential. So don't put out anything that could lead to cross-contamination. Here is our favorite tried-and-true appy: Artichoke Dip This is so easy and delicious as not to be believed! Ingredients: 2 -3 cans of artichokes, cut into small pieces 1 red pepper, diced Swiss, Cheddar, Parmesan, Muenster, and other cheeses of your liking Salt, pepper, onion flakes gluten-free crackers Directions: Spray a low casserole dish. In a bowl, mix in the cut artichokes, pepper, and pieces of cheeses. Add in the spices; only a little salt and more pepper, as the cheeses are usually salty and the artichokes could have been processed with some. Probably there will be salt on the crackers, so you don't want to kill this dish with it. Pour in the mixture into the casserole and heat until bubbly. Serve with only gluten free crackers or veggie sticks. . Part of the fun is dipping in a bowl together, so make sure if people double-dip that everyone is safe! Option: some people like to add spinach or cream cheese to their dip. It's not my way, but the popularity of spinach-artichoke dips conveys that it may be right for you! Soup Soup is warm, comforting, and sets the stage for what's to come. Here are two recipes from which you can choose that are sure to whet the whistle of people for dishes to come! Apple Kale Soup Apples are abundant in autumn, and I created this dish in desperation to use foods that I had in the fridge on a day when the chill started to go through my bones. As a child I didn't understand kale, but now know it's a flexible, healthy and friendly vegetable. Ingredients: 2-3 apples, peeled and sliced and diced 2/3 bag of fresh kale, or a hearty bunch cut into small pieces 1 purple onion, diced 1/3 pound of bacon (maple bacon is an especially good choice) 16 oz chicken broth (have another can handy if you want it) Salt, pepper Olive oil Plain nonfat yogurt Directions: Saute the onion and bacon in a little olive oil until they are brown and crispy. Add in a little broth, then the kale, which will shrink up immediately. Then add the apples in, along with the rest of the broth. Season with salt and pepper and let it simmer awhile on medium-low heat. I think a creamy looking soup is elegant, so I recommend spooning out the mixture into a food processor to make it smooth. Then return to the pan, adding more broth if you want. When that is done, add in the secret ingredient—plain yogurt. It will give it a creamy consistency and a little zing. You have to play with the amount of broth, yogurt and mixture to create a soup the consistency you like. It is an unusual soup that is tasty and sure to garner compliments. Gluten-Free Pumpkin Squash Soup In contrast to the previous soup recipe with is savory, this is a sweet soup recipe. Ingredients: 2 cans pumpkin 1 small diced onion 1 medium butternut squash, cubed 3 cups chicken broth 1 teaspoon butter 2 tablespoons gluten-free flour or cornstarch 2 Tablespoon brown sugar 1 cup + half-and-half Salt, pepper, ginger, cinnamon to taste Directions: Saute the onions and squash in butter. Mash the squash when it is soft. Add to the chicken broth and simmer. Stir in the canned pumpkin. Mix gluten-free flour/cornstarch, butter, sugar, and spices. Fold in cream last. Heat but do not boil. You can garnish with a few slivered almonds if you want. Salad While my mama had many culinary talents, the salads she made weren't her specialty, to say the least. Her "green" salad consisted of iceberg lettuce with tomatoes thrown on top, or we might enjoy a Waldorf salad that had red-delicious apples cut up, some celery and pecans that she mixed with Miracle Whip. It took me years to understand that salads could be the best part of a meal. Here are substitutions for what mama didn't know about! Diversity Salad Salads are most enjoyable with they contain a mixture of ingredients. You are the artist in the kitchen and get to decide what ingredients in what proportions. Here are our suggestions of items to consider: Baby spinach, romaine lettuce, and spring greens are the base of the salad, but don't rely on this to be the biggest ingredient. Using plenty of other vegetables will make every bite an experience, each mouthful different than the bite before. Add liberal amounts of carrots, tomatoes, onions, cucumber, and peppers, cut in various shapes and types. We love radishes, celery, sprouts, broccoli, cauliflower, and fresh mushrooms, but not everyone agrees. Avocado, beets and asparagus are other vegetables that may be questionable; while we like them, not everyone does. We are sensitive to the palate of our guests and modify the salad ingredients to please them. Leafy vegetables like kale, arugula, cabbage, chicory, watercress can make a salad interesting. Likewise, using fresh basil, cilantro, parsley and other herbs create tastes that give each salad a different flavor. Do you like roasted red peppers? Artichoke hearts? Banana pepper slices tossed into a salad can be delightful if you like that kind of spiciness. Olive varieties are endless. We recommend putting out different types of dressings so people have choice. For examples of easy and delicious dressings, there is a list for you to consider in our book Going Gluten Free. Waldorf Salad This salad can be anything but boring! The base: Toasted walnuts or pecans – toasting gives them a nice crunch that adds to the texture of the dish. Apples—I like flavorful crispy kinds, unpeeled so the color shines out. Red? Green? Combination? You choose! You also get to choose how to slice them. Hunks, thin slivers, slices—you're in charge. I rather like them slivered—they seem more delicate for an elegant meal. Directions: Celery—Cut it in slender shreds. Seedless Grapes or Dried Cranberries—Historically, grapes were the ingredient selected in the original Waldorf Astoria recipe. You can certainly keep tradition and use them. I like grapes to eat but not as fond of them in salads, so I prefer dried cranberries. I live in New England and using them at this time of year seems right. The dried berries add another texture and bright color to the dish. Optional: Some folks like to add thin sliced red or green peppers or even a few scallions. Dressing This is the make-or-break part of this salad. Mayonnaise is traditional, but today has been sidelined by the use plain yogurt or sour cream. Many people use a combination. I veer away from mayo in preference is a thinner, lighter dressing. Others add a tablespoon of fresh lemon juice mixed with a little honey. If you're into mustard, you may want to add a teaspoon, but no more or you will kill the dressing. It will need a little salt and pepper. Have handy some fresh mint leaves or parsley for garnish. Don't forget to serve it on some leafy lettuce. The lettuce bottom helps make the rest of the salad work even better! Main Dishes Turkey is by far the main dish at most Thanksgiving dinners. Every year, recipes seem to get more complex, like Turduckins or deep fried turkeys. Here is our recipe—it's simple, delicious, and healthy. Roasted Turkey Ingredients: Turkey Salt, pepper, paprika Butter Can of turkey/chicken broth Directions: Choose your turkey to your liking—some people like 20 pound birds with legs attached, others prefer a turkey breast and forgo the dark meat. Whatever you pick, you must decide whether to live the skin on or off. I always pull it off. It's an emotionally wrenching thing to do, but it's much healthier and makes for a tastier and prettier dish (in my opinion). I put the bird in a roasting pan that has some broth on the bottom. This keeps the bird moist as it cooks and it catches the natural juices and becomes the base for awesome gravy later on. Then I butter the bird a bit to enhance flavor and to help the spices stick. Heavily salt, pepper and add paprika to the exterior of the bird. There are many different types of paprika and some are quite spicy, so judge accordingly. Paprika makes the bird brown beautifully. Put a lid or aluminum foil over the bird and bake at 425F degrees for an hour or several more, depending on the size of the bird. This will enable the bird to cook through (nothing worse than raw poultry!) and not over-brown on top. After it appears that the bird is done on the inside, then remove the foil/lid and let it brown on top. You can baste it with some of the broth to keep it moist. When the bird is golden brown, you can take it out and eat it steaming hot. Add some corn starch, salt and pepper to the broth, whisk over medium heat, and make gravy to go on mashed potatoes if you like. This is a simple recipe that is sure to please! I was a vegetarian for two decades and know how awesome non-meat holiday dishes can be. Tofurky never quite worked for me. Here is one of our favorite dishes - but it's not safe for vegans because it contains both eggs and cheese. Sorry about that! We can't be all things to all people—but at least we are honestly transparent. Holiday Cheesy-Nut Delight Ingredients: 30 oz. cottage cheese 1 purple onion, diced 5 eggs 1 cup grated cheddar cheese 1 cup chopped walnuts 3-4 cups gluten-free corn flakes or rice krispies Butter Directions: Salt, pepper, A-1 sauce, optional dried minced onions or dried parsley Saute the onion in butter until transparent and lovely. In a bowl, add cottage cheese, eggs, cheddar, walnuts, a tablespoon of A-1 sauce, and spices to your liking. Then stir in the cooked onions. Finally, add in the cereal. The mixture should be moist but not runny. Poor it into a greased pan—you can make them into a loaf, muffins, or cook in a casserole pan. The size of the pan you use determine how long you will cook this dish. It should take around a half-hour for most size pans. The dish will be firm and browned, but don't overcook it or it will be dry. It cuts nicely when cool. If you want to make it look even fancier, you can drizzle a bechemal sauce over it with parsley garnish. This is a family favorite, and we hope you will enjoy it too. Chop 1 onion sauted in butter, add to mixture of eggs, cottage cheese, cheddar cheese, walnuts, salt, pepper, a T of A-1 and mix in 4 cups of gluten-free Corn Flakes. Baked in a greased pan at 350F degrees for an hour. Let sit 10 minutes uncovered before cutting. Stuffing What's Thanksgiving dinner without stuffing? Here's our version—tweak to your heart's content! Gluten-Free Thanksgiving Stuffing Ingredients: Leftover gluten free bread, any type, torn into small pieces Olive Oil Celery and Onion, cut into small pieces Chicken/turkey broth Salt, Pepper, Sage, Rosemary, Thyme, Parsley Butter Optional: Nuts (your choice), dried fruit (apricots, apples), sausage, or vegetables Directions: I gave up cooking the stuffing in the turkey ages ago. It turns out much better if you bake it in pan of its own. Saute until soft onion and celery in butter. Spray a cooking dish. In a bowl, mix the bread pieces, pour in the celery/onion mixture, add spices, and enough chicken broth to make it very moist. Add in whatever other ingredients you want. Personally, the simpler the better. Sometimes too much is overkill. Bake at 350 until it is firm with a light crust on top – then enjoy! Vegetables Let's face it—the sky's the limit when it comes to making amazing gluten-free vegetable dishes. I learned that color was important for a festive meal, so ours is white (potatoes), yellow (corn), orange (pumpkin), and red (cranberries or tomatoes in the salads). Instead doing green beans, broccoli, or asparagus—all that are awesome—we've given you a less familiar Brussel sprout recipe. Mashed Potatoes What could be easier? Scrape clean potatoes, cut them into hunks and toss them into boiling water until soft. Then mash. Add butter, milk, salt and pepper. Make more than you think you're going to need—they are going to disappear. Baked Corn Take 2 cans of gluten-free creamed corn, a can of whole kernel corn, drained, and mix them together in a bowl with 2-3 eggs, 1/3 cup corn starch, dried minced onion, salt and pepper and a smidge of butter. Pour into a greased casserole and bake until it is bubbly. Bacony-Delicious Brussel Sprouts Ingredients: Bacon Brussel sprouts Olive oil Salt/pepper Balsamic vinegar Parmesan cheese Directions: Cut the bacon into little pieces and fry them in olive oil. When brown, toss in the sprouts—slice the bigger ones. They will brown beautifully—you may want to put a lid on them for a few minutes to make sure they cook through and become soft. Then add salt, pepper, a tablespoon of balsamic vinegar and sprinkle with parm cheese. These are bound to be a hit! Bread I'll be honest with you—as a child I learned to bake some of the most fantastic yeast wheat bread imaginable. gluten-free bread has, by far, been the hardest thing for me to recreate with satisfaction. My solution? Don't try to do it in a way that recreates child memories. Find a new way. You may be pleased with the result. Pumpkin Muffins This is my own concoction. As you may recall from our cooking model described in our book, Going Gluten Free, I don't measure ingredients. I work with them in a zen method until they seem to be right. So I'll give you my recipe, with the recommendation that you tweak it as your intuition dictates! Ingredients: 1 can pumpkin 1 1/2 c. gluten-free flour 1 c sugar ½ c. canola oil 2-3 eggs 1 tsp baking powder and 1 tsp baking soda Cinnamon Chocolate chips Directions: Mix all of the ingredients together in a bowl, then pour into greased muffin tins. Make sure the tins are gluten-free safe. We have a special pan that nothing else goes in, and recommend you do the same. It's better to spray the muffin cups instead of using papers—the muffins actually come out much prettier. They rise high and are beautiful and tasty. These are our autumn delights! Fritters Ingredients: 3 c. gluten-free flour ½ c. canola oil + oil for cooking 1-2 eggs 1 tsp baking powder Salt Optional ingredients: sliced scallions, cheese, herbs, or whatever pleases you! Directions: Mix the ingredients together in a bowl while the oil heats in a skillet. Drop a large spoonful of the batter into the oil, and flip when it browns. When both sides are golden, remove and add more fritter batter into the pan. Serve hot with butter. They satisfy the need for bread without having to feel dissatisfied with trying to make a loaf and expect it to be like traditional wheat bread. Maybe one day the recipes and products will be there for that, but not today. This is a satisfactory substitute, to be sure! Dessert Every meal needs to end with a food that ritually signifies the meal is over. By this time, bellies are usually full and dessert needs to be symbolic more than substantive. It should look pretty and taste sweet. Here is the quintessential Thanksgiving dessert. Pumpkin Pie This is the traditional dessert and so easy to make. Gluten-Free Pie Crust: 1 can pumpkin 2/3 c. sugar 3 eggs 1 can evaporated milk Cinnamon, nutmeg Butter A tsp of corn starch Directions: The nice thing about making a gluten-free pumpkin pie for Thanksgiving dinner is that all the ingredients in the pie are naturally gluten-free, except for the pie crust. So follow the directions on the can for pie, or use the directions here. Mix all the ingredients in a bowl and then put into a gluten-free crust (your choice of frozen or homemade) and bake until it is firm and beautiful. Don't burn it! It will firm up as it sits for a few minutes. Top with ice cream or whip cream, and maybe a garnish of chocolate or glazed nuts. Serve with coffee or tea, and enjoy the closing conversation. This meal should leave everyone feeling satiated and satisfied. What most people are grateful for at Thanksgiving is to just sit together with loved ones and share good conversation, laughter, and connection. What they eat isn't nearly as important as eating together. But with a menu like this, everyone can eat together and feel treated to a gourmet meal fit for a king. And it's fun to show nonbelievers how scrumptious Going Gluten Free can be!
  4. Celiac.com 11/10/2014 - Preparing a great gluten-free Thanksgiving is a easy as 1-2-3-4! First, and foremost, make sure your turkey of choice is gluten-free. Not all brands of turkey are gluten-free. Some contain gluten in their additives. Especially beware of any seasoning or gravy packets that come with otherwise gluten-free turkeys. If you’re not sure, check the ingredients and use our Gluten-Free Ingredient Lists to help you shop. Here’s a helpful list of gluten-free turkey brands from our online forum. There are probably many other gluten-free brands, but be sure to check with your local store and read labels to be sure. Next, make great gluten-free gravy with Celiac.com’s delicious gluten-free gravy recipe. Remember, some bouillon cubes contain gluten, so be sure to use gluten-free bouillon cubes. Tip: Thicken your homemade gravy with either corn starch or arrowroot flour. Great Gluten-free Gravy This recipe makes a rich, savory gravy that will have all your holiday guests smiling! Makes enough gravy to serve about eight to ten people. Ingredients: 1 pound turkey giblets and neck 1½ quarts gluten-free chicken stock (low sodium is fine) 2 carrots, chopped 1 stalk celery, chopped 2 cups water 1½ cups pan drippings from roasted turkey 4 tablespoons of corn starch (approximate) Note: One tablespoon corn starch (1/4 ounce) thickens one cup of liquid 2 tablespoons tomato paste 2 tablespoons cranberry sauce Salt and ground black pepper to taste Preparation: While the turkey is roasting, place the turkey giblets and neck into a large saucepan with the carrots, celery, water, and chicken stock. Bring to a boil over medium heat, skim off any foam that rises to the top, reduce heat to low, and simmer the stock for 3 hours. Skim off the fat, strain the stock, and set aside. There should be about 4 cups of stock. Take carrots and celery and press through a strainer. Spoon strained carrots and celery into the stock and stir. Skim off and discard all but ¼ cup of the fat from the drippings in the roasting pan, and place the roasting pan over medium heat. Whisk in the corn starch, then heat and stir the corn starch mixture until it becomes pale golden brown, about 5 minutes. To avoid lumps, mix the starch with an equal amount of cold liquid until it forms a paste, then whisk it into the liquid you're trying to thicken. Once the thickener is added, cook it briefly to remove any starchy flavor. Don't overcook. Whisk in the stock and tomato paste; bring to a boil, simmer for 5 minutes, then whisk in the cranberry sauce. Simmer for 10 more minutes. Season to taste with salt and black pepper. Best Ever Gluten-Free Stuffing Recipe Third, make sure you prepare gluten-free stuffing. Try Celiac.com's Best Ever Gluten-free Stuffing Recipe. Ingredients: 5-6 cups gluten-free bread (about 2 loaves), cut into one-inch cubes, toasted and cooled 2 tablespoons olive oil 3 cups celery, chopped 1 large yellow onion, chopped 1 tablespoon fresh thyme, finely chopped 1 tablespoon fresh sage, finely chopped 1-2 teaspoons fresh rosemary, finely chopped 1-2 cups gluten-free chicken broth 1 egg yolk 1 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon pepper Directions: Sauté the onion and celery in olive oil on medium-low heat until translucent. Stir in the rosemary, sage, and thyme, and cook another one or two minutes, until the aroma of the herbs fills the air. Bring the chicken stock to boil on high heat. Place the egg yolk in a medium-sized bowl and carefully spoon two or three ounces of the chicken stock into the egg yolk, slowly, while whisking the mixture. Add the rest of the chicken stock to the egg mixture. (blending a small amount of stock into the egg first will prevent scrambled eggs.) Add the cooled celery, onion, and herbs mixture into the stock and egg mixture. Toss the bread cubes into this mixture and coat thoroughly. Add the salt and pepper and toss bread a bit more. Place all of this into a greased casserole dish (big enough to hold three quarts) and cover it with aluminum foil. Place in 400°F oven for 40-50 min, covering as needed with aluminum foil, until done. Insert a toothpick into the stuffing. If it comes out clean, the stuffing is done. If not, bake until the toothpick comes out clean. If you want to cook the stuffing inside the turkey add only 1 cup of chicken broth. Serves six to eight people, depending on their appetite for stuffing. Thanksgiving Gluten-free Pumpkin Pie Lastly, prepare winning gluten-free desserts, such as Celiac.com’s Best Ever Gluten-free Pumpkin Pie Recipe (Adapted from Libby's Original Pumpkin Pie Recipe) Ingredients: 3/4 cup granulated sugar 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger 1/4 teaspoon ground cloves 2 large eggs 1 can (15 oz.) Libby's 100% Pure Pumpkin (Yes, it's gluten-free!) 1 can (12 fl. oz.) Evaporated Milk 1 unbaked 9-inch (4-cup volume) deep-dish pie shell Whipped cream (optional) Directions: MIX sugar, cinnamon, salt, ginger and cloves in small bowl. Beat eggs in large bowl. Stir in pumpkin and sugar-spice mixture. Gradually stir in evaporated milk. POUR into gluten-free pie shell. BAKE in preheated 425° F oven for 15 minutes. Reduce temperature to 350° F; bake for 40 to 50 minutes or until knife inserted near center comes out clean. Cool on wire rack for 2 hours. Serve immediately or refrigerate. Top with whipped cream before serving. For more great gluten-free sides, desserts, and more, be sure to consult Celiac.com’s Gluten-free Recipes list. For even more ideas, check Celiac.com’s previous Gluten-free Thanksgiving and Holiday Guides from years past: Gluten-free Thanksgiving 2013 Gluten-free Thanksgiving 2010 Gluten-free Thanksgiving 2009
  5. Just curious what people are buying. What brands are considered safe? We are hosting this year and I have my eye on a Whole Foods free range turkey, but they are very expensive!
  6. Celiac.com 11/18/2013 - It's Thanksgiving time once again, and celiac.com is here with gluten-free information, tips and recipes to help you make the most of your gluten-free Thanksgiving and holiday celebrations! These helpful tips will help to make a great gluten-free turkey dinner at home: First, always make sure you buy a 100% gluten-free turkey for your holiday dinner. Don't assume your turkey is gluten-free. Numerous brands use gluten when processing their turkeys, so be sure to read the label, and to make sure there is no hidden gluten in any of the ingredients. Check our extensive list of safe gluten-free foods and ingredients, along with gluten-free shopping guides to make gluten-free shopping easier. Brining is a great way to prepare your gluten-free turkey that will leave your guests quizzing you about your secrets to such a moist, savory bird. For those of you who plan a smaller Thanksgiving, consider this recipe for stuffed Cornish Game Hens. Remember, you can also brine the game hens for a extra-moist, flavorful birds. Next, make sure to prepare a gluten-free stuffing! Don't risk cross-contamination by putting gluten-based bread or stuffing ingredients in your turkey. Gluten-free stuffing is a holiday staple that keeps them coming back for more. Be sure to check out Celiac.com's recipe for our tried and true gluten-free holiday stuffing that will keep your guests happily coming back for seconds. You can find some alternative stuffing recipes on celiac.com's forum. Be sure to prepare gluten-free gravy. If you don't want to prepare your own, be sure to use a gluten-free gravy mix. Thicken homemade gravy with either corn starch, tapioca or arrowroot flour. Be careful: Bouillon cubes often contain wheat or gluten, so make sure to use only gluten-free bouillon cubes. Vegetarian boullion is also an option. Lastly, ordering gluten-free baking ingredients and other hard-to-find items, like prepared gluten-free pies, ahead of time will help you to spend less time cooking and more time with friends and family. Many excellent prepared gluten-free products can be ordered online and delivered directly to your door from places like the Gluten-Free Mall. Your purchases there will directly support the celiac awareness and support mission of Celiac.com. Here's a recipe for a delicious variation on traditional mashed potatoes: Perfect Harvest Mashed Potatoes These harvest mashed potatoes are a nice alternative or supplement to traditional mashed potatoes. They go great with gluten-free stuffing and gravy, or with a splash of butter. Ingredients: 1 pound Yukon gold potatoes 1 pound large red potatoes 1½ pounds sweet potatoes ¼ cup butter ½ cup buttermilk ¼ cup Greek yogurt ¼ cup freshly grated Romano cheese 1 tablespoon prepared horseradish ½ teaspoon salt ½ teaspoon pepper ¼ teaspoon ground cinnamon Directions: Boil water with a dash of salt in a large pot. Rinse and peel all potatoes, and cut into 1-inch pieces. Place peeled potatoes in boiling salted water, cover and cook 15 to 20 minutes or until tender. Drain and place in a large bowl. Add ¼ cup butter and add the rest of the ingredients ingredients; mash with a potato masher until smooth. Top with additional butter, if desired. ** For a sure-fire dessert hit, serve up some Classic Gluten-free Holiday Pumpkin Pie. Round out your gluten-free dinner with gluten-free side dishes from Celiac.com's extensive listing of gluten-free recipes. Meanwhile, be sure to check out these other gluten-free Thanksgiving recipes that will help make your holiday dinner a success: Fast Nutty Apple Crumble Holiday Pumpkin Bread (Gluten-Free) Gingerbread #2 (Gluten-Free) Molasses Spice Cookies (Gluten-Free) Pumpkin Chocolate Chip Cookies (Gluten-Free) Soft Sugar Cookies (Gluten-Free) Frosted Pumpkin Bars (Gluten-Free) Pumpkin Cheesecake with Butter Pecan Crust (Gluten-Free) In addition to our recipes for Classic Gluten-free Pumpkin Pie, and gluten-free Ginger Crust Pumpkin Pie, we offer recipes for Gluten-free Apple Pie and 20 Recipes for Festive Gluten-free Holiday Treats.
  7. Stuffing is standard fare at just about every Thanksgiving or holiday meal that involves a bird. This recipe will help those with gluten-sensitivities to keep the stuffing right there on the plate next to the turkey. Served with mashed potatoes, gluten-free gravy, and maybe a little cranberry sauce, and you've got the makings of a great gluten-free holiday! Ingredients: 5-6 cups white, gluten-free bread (about 2 loaves), cut into one-inch cubes, toasted and cooled 2 tablespoons olive oil 3 cups celery, chopped 2 shallots, minced 1 large or 2 medium yellow onions, chopped 1 tablespoon fresh thyme, minced 1 tablespoon fresh sage, minced 1-2 teaspoons fresh rosemary, minced 1-1½ cups gluten-free chicken broth ½ cup white wine 1 egg yolk 1 teaspoon salt ½ teaspoon pepper Bits of cooked sausage or bacon, diced chestnut, pecan, apple, cranberry, currant, or raisin (optional) *Make sure any sausage is gluten-free! Preparation: Sauté shallots, onion and celery in olive oil on medium-low heat until translucent. Stir in the rosemary, sage, and thyme, and cook another one or two minutes, until the aroma of the herbs fills the air. Add wine and continue cooking over medium heat until liquid is reduced by half. Remove from heat and allow to cool. Bring the chicken stock to boil on high heat. Note: If cooking stuffing inside turkey, add just 1 cup of chicken broth. Place the egg yolk in a large bowl and carefully spoon two or three ounces of the chicken stock into the egg yolk, slowly, while whisking the mixture. Add the rest of the chicken stock to the egg mixture. Make sure to blend a small amount of stock into the egg first to prevent scrambled eggs. Add the cooled celery, onion, and herbs mixture into the stock and egg mixture. Toss the bread cubes into this mixture and coat thoroughly. Add the salt and pepper and mix. Place the stuffing mixture into a greased casserole dish and cook in 400°F oven for 40-50 min, covering as needed with aluminum foil, until done. Note: The stuffing is done when you can insert a toothpick into the stuffing and it comes out clean. Make sure you bake stuffing until the toothpick comes out clean. Serves about six to eight people. Scale recipe according to amount of stuffing required. Suggestion: Add finely diced cooked sausage or bacon bits to the sautéed vegetables, or toss in bits of diced chestnut, pecan, apple, cranberry, currant, or raisins.
  8. Hey everyone, I just wanted to post an update on me and my beloved. I went to go see her and her family for about 5 days, over Thanksgiving day and weekend, and just got back yesterday. We had a very wonderful time together and she's healing up and finally feeling much better than she was : ) <3. Everything at Thanksgiving dinner and every other meal was completely gluten-free and she and her mother had also been experimenting a little with gluten-free baking also...and I got to try some gluten-free cereal haha. It all went very well. One aspect of the last night was somewhat humorous though. Her brother had offered to take her and I out for ice cream or hot chocolate after we picked her up from work. We were planning on watching a movie back at their house after we got home, and had picked up some drinks for us. I'd gotten me and my beloved something to share since she usually doesn't snack or drink pop all that much. While we were in the restaurant, her brother got a giant order of fries and offered them to both of us; she refused for obvious reasons, and then I refused because of wanting to support her with it, and then also to avoid cross-contamination later, if she ended up drinking from the soda I got for us. Turns out, we shared it a lot! hahaha XD. It was an interesting first experience for me to have to be cautious about that and working together for her health. I'm sure it will be invaluable in the future, as well as a fond memory of caring for her and loving her in that way ^ _ ^ . Thanks for everyone who's been offering advice and support to me and her in all of my posts! I look forward to sharing more about our journey through life with this and learning even more. God Bless, -Dré Rosales
  9. Celiac.com 11/11/2010 - The holidays are upon us, once again, and that means it's time toremind folks that a little planning and preparation will help anyonewith celiac disease or gluten intolerance to enjoy a safe, deliciousgluten-free Thanksgiving and holiday season without worrying aboutinadvertently eating wheat or gluten. For folks cooking a gluten-free turkey dinner at home, here are some helpful tips to make things easier: First, make sure the turkey you plan to serve for your gluten-freeholiday dinner is, in fact, a gluten-free turkey. This is notautomatically true. Many brands of turkey are processed with addedgluten—so, don't assume, and make sure to check the ingredients list.Celiac.com offers a pretty comprehensive list of safe gluten-free foods and ingredients, along with gluten-free shopping guides to make yourgluten-free shopping easier. Second, make sure that any stuffing you serve is gluten-free! Accept nosubstitute. There's no need to risk putting gluten-based stuffing inyour turkey. You can astound and delight all your guests withceliac.com's delicious Best Gluten-free Holiday Stuffing Recipe (below). Third, prepare a simple, delicious gluten-free gravy using Celiac.com'sThanksgiving Holiday Gluten-Free Turkey Gravy recipe, or your favorite gluten-freegravy mix. Note: Be careful, many bouillon cubes contain wheat or gluten, so make sure to use only gluten-free bouillon cubes. Tip: Thicken homemade gravy with either corn starch or arrowroot flour. Prepare easy, tasty gluten-free side dishes by browsing Celiac.com'sextensive listing of gluten-free recipes, where you will find sidedishes to impress even the snootiest gourmet. Order gluten-free baking ingredients and other hard-to-find items likeprepared gluten-free pies ahead of time for convenience—this will allowyou to spend more time with friends and family rather than spending allof your time in the kitchen! Many excellent prepared gluten-free products can now be ordered anddelivered directly to your door from places like the Gluten-Free Mall, and your purchases there actually directly support Celiac.com. Here are some helpful holiday tips and information for anyone planning to dine out, or at a friend or relative's house: Ali Demeritte's blog entry: The Dinner Party Drama—Two Guidelines to Assure a Pleasant Gluten-Free Experience. Danna Korn's article: Venturing Out of the House: Restaurant Realities. Aimee Eiguren's blog entry: Eating Out Gluten-Free and Without Fear. Chef Daniel Moran's article: Traveling and Eating Gluten-Free at Restaurants. Chef Daniel Moran's article: Traveling and Eating Gluten-Free Meals at Small or Moving Restaurants. Celiac.com's Best Gluten-free Holiday Stuffing Recipe Ingredients: 5-6 cups white, gluten-free bread (about 2 loaves), cut into one-inch cubes, toasted and cooled 2 tablespoons olive oil 3 cups celery, chopped 2 shallots, minced 1 large or 2 medium yellow onions, chopped 1 tablespoon fresh thyme, minced 1 tablespoon fresh sage, minced 1-2 teaspoons fresh rosemary, minced 1-1½ cups gluten-free chicken broth ½ cup white wine 1 egg yolk 1 teaspoon salt ½ teaspoon pepper Bits of cooked sausage or bacon, diced chestnut, pecan, apple,cranberry, currant, or raisin (optional) *Make sure any sausage isgluten-free! Preparation: Sauté shallots, onion and celery in olive oil on medium-low heat until translucent. Stir in the rosemary, sage, and thyme, and cook another one or twominutes, until the aroma of the herbs fills the air. Add wine andcontinue cooking over medium heat until liquid is reduced by half.Remove from heat and allow to cool. Bring the chicken stock to boil on high heat. Note: If cooking stuffing inside turkey, add just 1 cup of chicken broth. Place the egg yolk in a large bowl and carefully spoon two or threeounces of the chicken stock into the egg yolk, slowly, while whiskingthe mixture. Add the rest of the chicken stock to the egg mixture. Make sure toblend a small amount of stock into the egg first to prevent scrambledeggs. Add the cooled celery, onion, and herbs mixture into the stock and eggmixture. Toss the bread cubes into this mixture and coat thoroughly.Add the salt and pepper and mix. Place the stuffing mixture into a greased casserole dish and cook in400°F oven for 40-50 min, covering as needed with aluminum foil, untildone. Note: The stuffing is done when you can insert a toothpick into thestuffing and it comes out clean. Make sure you bake stuffing until thetoothpick comes out clean. Serves about six to eight people. Suggestion: Add finely diced cooked sausage or bacon bits to thesautéed vegetables, or toss in bits of diced chestnut, pecan, apple,cranberry, currant, or raisin. *Make sure any sausage is gluten-free! Gluten-free Classics: Holiday Pumpkin Pie Ingredients: ¾ cup granulated sugar 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon ½ teaspoon salt ½ teaspoon ground ginger ¼ teaspoon ground clove 2 large eggs (Duck eggs work great!) 1 can (15 oz.) Libby's 100% Pure Pumpkin (Yes, it's gluten-free!) 1 can (12 fl. oz.) Evaporated Milk (Delicious with evaporated goat's milk!) 1 unbaked 9-inch (4-cup volume) gluten-free pie shell Whipped cream (optional) Directions: Mix sugar, cinnamon, salt, ginger and cloves in small bowl. Beat eggsin large bowl. Stir in pumpkin and sugar-spice mixture. Gradually stirin evaporated milk. Pour into gluten-free pie shell. Bake in preheated 425° F oven for 15 minutes. Reduce temperature to350° F; bake for 40 to 50 minutes or until knife inserted near centercomes out clean. Cool on wire rack for 2 hours. Serve immediately orrefrigerate. Top with whipped cream before serving. *Adapted from Libby's Original Pumpkin Pie Recipe
  10. Celiac.com 11/23/2011 - What’s a Thanksgiving without savory stuffing and sweet pumpkin pie? Well, it surely isn’t Thanksgiving to me; anything can be delicously gluten-free with a bit of imagination and creativity. Why waste your time worrying about what you can’t eat at the holiday dinner table when you can prepare endless naturally gluten-free dishes such as fresh cranberry relish, roasted turkey, parsnip quinoa pilaf, roasted beets and asparagus, roasted red pepper tapenade with rice crackers, creamy pumpkin pudding and dark chocolate covered almonds? All naturally gluten-free, all delicious. There’s no need to dwell on the puffed pastries and succulent pumpkin pies staring you in the face when you can bake gluten-free versions using gluten-free flour blends. This time of the year can be challenging for many folks trying to make healthy choices. It seems everywhere we turn there are sugarplums dancing in our heads and holiday gatherings offering cookies, desserts, cocktails and heavy casseroles. Don’t get down on yourself and dig into the platters loaded with sugar, unhealthy fats and salt; keep your head up and think about all the naturally gluten-free foods that are healthy and delicious. Let’s start with appetizers. How about an antipasta filled with gluten-free organic cheese and organic sliced lean meats, fresh herbs, olives, roasted red peppers and marinades mushrooms. You can easily serve this with hummus and Greek plain yogurt as well as a flavorful tapenade. Gluten-Free crackers and crudités are great to serve with these appetizers and can be enjoyed guilt-free for all of your gluten-free guests. Moving on to your main course, go for the turkey but make sure to create your own brine as some pre-made turkeys are made with a gluten-ous glaze. Mashed sweet potatoes? Check. Roasted vegetables? Check. Gluten-Free stuffing and gravy? Check and check. Try making healthy gravy using low-sodium vegetable broth, dried oregano and low-fat milk; heat until mixture thickens. And be sure to keep an eye on added salt. Season your dishes with fresh herbs such as thyme and marjoram along with balsamic vinegar and a small spoonful of Dijon mustard instead of reaching for that salt shaker. Now it’s time for dessert. Choose dark chocolate as it’s a great nibble for your sweet tooth and can be enjoyed melted over fresh fruit and Greek plain yogurt for a homemade ice cream without added sugar and processed ingredients. Just be sure to reduce the amount of added sugar in your baked goods and enhance the natural sweetness by adding in more all-spice, cinnamon and almond extract. You can also create fresh fruit purees and pumpkin puree to add into brownies, cakes and pies for a healthy gluten-free spin on the classic gluten-ous and calorie-laden desserts. I like to add applesauce, pureed banana and pureed prunes for a tasty and fiber-rich way to add naturally gluten-free flavor to any dessert. Have a Happy and Healthy Gluten-Free Thanksgiving.
  11. Celiac.com 11/11/2011 - Once again, Thanksgiving looms, as does the specter of pulling off a smooth, tasty, gluten-free dinner on the big day. To help make that goal an easy reality, celiac.com once again offers up a heaping of gluten-free information and recipes to help make your gluten-free Thanksgiving celebrations a smashing success! For those cooking a gluten-free turkey dinner at home, these helpful tips will make your work easier: First,be certain to start with a 100% gluten-free turkey for your gluten-freeholiday dinner. Gluten? In my turkey? Yes! Many brands use gluten whenprocessing their turkeys. Don't assume your turkey is gluten-free. Besure to check the ingredients list. Celiac.com offers a fairlycomprehensive list of safe gluten-free foods and ingredients, along with gluten-free shopping guides to make gluten-free shopping easier. Next,be certain to serve only gluten-free stuffing! Accept no substitute.Don't risk putting gluten-based stuffing in your turkey. Instead,astonish and satisfy all of your guests by preparing celiac.com'sdelicious Best Gluten-free Holiday Stuffing Recipe. Lastly,prepare a simple, delicious gluten-free gravy using Celiac.com'sThanksgiving Holiday Gluten-Free Turkey Gravy recipe, or your favoritegluten-free gravy mix. Thicken homemade gravy with either corn starch orarrowroot flour. Be careful: Many bouillon cubes contain wheat or gluten, so make sure to use only gluten-free bouillon cubes. Make easy, tasty gluten-free side dishes using Celiac.com's extensive listing of gluten-free recipes.Order gluten-free baking ingredients and other hard-to-find items like prepared gluten-free pies ahead of time for convenience—this will allow you to spend more time with friends and family rather than spending all of your time in the kitchen! Many excellent prepared gluten-free products can now be ordered and delivered directly to your door from places like the Gluten-Free Mall, and your purchases there actually directly support Celiac.com. Gluten-free Thanksgiving Recipes: Our Great Brined Turkey recipe offers a fabulous way to prepare your gluten-free turkey that will leave your guests quizzing you about your secrets to such a moist, savory bird. Spiced Pumpkin Soup makes a delightful holiday treat for yourself, your family, or your guests. Gluten-free Stuffing is a holiday staple that keeps them coming back for more. Gluten-free Gravy is the perfect topping to your delicious stuffing. If you don't want to prepare your own, be sure to use a gluten-free gravy mix. Meanwhile, our recipe for Red Pepper Pumpkin Seeds is sure to delight, and makes a great addition to the holiday snack bowl. In addition to our ever-popular recipe for Gluten-free Pumpkin Pie, we offer this delicious variation: Ginger Crust Pumpkin Pie: In anticipation of the next two months worth of feasting, I’ve been tinkering with this Thanksgiving classic. The crust is perfectly spiced and also goes well with sweet potato pies. A dollop of fresh whipped cream and you’re good to go. Coconut flakes also make a tasty topping.Ingredients: Crust 1 ½ cups gluten-free gingersnaps ½ cup walnuts 3 tablespoons light brown sugar ¼ teaspoon ground nutmeg 4 tablespoons melted butter Filling 1 ¼ cup canned pumpkin ½ cup sweetened condensed milk 1 teaspoon each ground ginger, cloves, and cinnamon ½ teaspoon salt ½ cup sugar ¼ teaspoon vanilla extract 2 eggs, lightly beaten Directions: Preheat oven to 350 degrees F and lightly butter a 9-inch pie dish. For the crust, combine cookies, walnuts, brown sugar, and nutmeg in a food processor and grind to a powder. Slowly add melted butter and pulse until mixture forms clumps. Spread evenly over the pie dish press down until tightly packed. Set aside. In the bowl of a mixer, combine pumpkin and condensed milk. Add sugar and salt and beat until well-combined. Add eggs, then vanilla and spices. Pour filling into the unbaked pie crust and bake for 40-50 minutes, or until center is set. Cool on a wire rack before serving.
  12. It's just not a holiday meal without gravy. Gravy is the thing that unites the holiday meal. Gravy pulls the meat and the stuffing and the potatoes together. Gravy makes it all good. This recipe makes a rich, savory gravy that will have all your holiday guests smiling! Makes enough gravy to serve about eight to ten people. Ingredients: 1 pound turkey giblets and neck 1½ quarts gluten-free chicken stock (low sodium is fine) 2 carrots, chopped 1 stalk celery, chopped 2 cups water 1½ cups pan drippings from roasted turkey 4 tablespoons of corn starch (approximate) Note: One tablespoon corn starch (1/4 ounce) thickens one cup of liquid 2 tablespoons tomato paste 2 tablespoons cranberry sauce Salt and ground black pepper to taste Preparation: While the turkey is roasting, place the turkey giblets and neck into a large saucepan with the carrots, celery, water, and chicken stock. Bring to a boil over medium heat, skim off any foam that rises to the top, reduce heat to low, and simmer the stock for 3 hours. Skim off the fat, strain the stock, and set aside. There should be about 4 cups of stock. Take carrots and celery and press through a strainer. Spoon strained carrots and celery into the stock and stir. Skim off and discard all but ¼ cup of the fat from the drippings in the roasting pan, and place the roasting pan over medium heat. Whisk in the corn starch, then heat and stir the corn starch mixture until it becomes pale golden brown, about 5 minutes. To avoid lumps, mix the starch with an equal amount of cold liquid until it forms a paste, then whisk it into the liquid you're trying to thicken. Once the thickener is added, cook it briefly to remove any starchy flavor. Don't overcook. Whisk in the stock and tomato paste; bring to a boil, simmer for 5 minutes, then whisk in the cranberry sauce. Simmer for 10 more minutes. Season to taste with salt and black pepper.
  13. Celiac.com 11/09/2009 - Every year around the holidays, celiac.com likes to remind folks that, with a little of planning and a few tips, anyone with celiac disease or gluten intolerance can enjoy a safe, delicious gluten-free Thanksgiving and holiday season without fear of accidentally eating gluten. If you're planning to make your own gluten-free turkey dinner, here are some helpful tips to help it go smoothly: Start your gluten-free holiday dinner with a gluten-free turkey. Not all brands of turkey are gluten-free. Some contain gluten in their additives—so, as with everything else, check the ingredients and use our Gluten-Free Ingredient Lists or our Gluten-Free Shopping Guides to help you shop. Demand gluten-free stuffing! Accept no substitute. Don’t risk gluten-based stuffing in your turkey. Instead, try celiac.com's favorite gluten-free stuffing recipe. Make simple, delicious gluten-free gravy using either a gluten-free gravy mix, or a gluten-free gravy recipe. Remember, some bouillon cubes contain gluten, so be sure to use gluten-free bouillon cubes. Tip: Thicken your homemade gravy with either corn starch or arrowroot flour. Prepare easy, tasty gluten-free side dishes by browsing celiac.com's extensive listing of gluten-free recipes, where you will find side dishes to impress even the snootiest gourmet. Order gluten-free baking ingredients and other hard-to-find items like prepared gluten-free pies ahead of time for convenience—this will allow you to spend more time with friends and family rather than spending all of your time in the kitchen! Many excellent prepared gluten-free products can now be ordered and delivered directly to your door from places like the Gluten-Free Mall. Folks planning to eat holiday meals out, or at a friend or relative's house, might find this information helpful: Ali Demeritte's blog entry: The Dinner Party Drama—Two Guidelines to Assure a Pleasant Gluten-Free Experience. Danna Korn's article: Venturing Out of the House: Restaurant Realities. Aimee Eiguren's blog entry: Eating Out Gluten-Free and Without Fear. Chef Daniel Moran's article: Traveling and Eating Gluten-Free at Restaurants. Chef Daniel Moran's article: Traveling and Eating Gluten-Free Meals at Small or Moving Restaurants. Celiac.com's Best Ever Gluten-free Stuffing Recipe Ingredients: 5-6 cups gluten-free bread (about 2 loaves), cut into one-inch cubes, toasted and cooled 2 tablespoons olive oil 3 cups celery, chopped 1 large yellow onion, chopped 1 tablespoon fresh thyme, finely chopped 1 tablespoon fresh sage, finely chopped 1-2 teaspoons fresh rosemary, finely chopped 1-2 cups gluten-free chicken broth 1 egg yolk 1 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon pepper Directions: Sautee the onion and celery in olive oil on medium-low heat until translucent. Stir in the rosemary, sage, and thyme, and cook another one or two minutes, until the aroma of the herbs fills the air. Bring the chicken stock to boil on high heat. Place the egg yolk in a medium-sized bowl and carefully spoon two or three ounces of the chicken stock into the egg yolk, slowly, while whisking the mixture. Add the rest of the chicken stock to the egg mixture. (blending a small amount of stock into the egg first will prevent scrambled eggs.) Add the cooled celery, onion, and herbs mixture into the stock and egg mixture. Toss the bread cubes into this mixture and coat thoroughly. Add the salt and pepper and toss bread a bit more. Place all of this into a greased casserole dish (big enough to hold three quarts) and cover it with aluminum foil. Place in 400°F oven for 40-50 min, covering as needed with aluminum foil, until done. Insert a toothpick into the stuffing. If it comes out clean, the stuffing is done. If not, bake until the toothpick comes out clean. If you want to cook the stuffing inside the turkey add only 1 cup of Chicken broth. Serves six to eight people, depending on their appetite for stuffing. Celiac.com's Best Ever Gluten-free Pumkin Pie Recipe (Adapted from Libby's Original Pumpkin Pie Recipe) Ingredients: 3/4 cup granulated sugar 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger 1/4 teaspoon ground cloves 2 large eggs 1 can (15 oz.) Libby's 100% Pure Pumpkin (Yes, it's gluten-free!) 1 can (12 fl. oz.) Evaporated Milk 1 unbaked 9-inch (4-cup volume) deep-dish pie shell Whipped cream (optional) Directions: MIX sugar, cinnamon, salt, ginger and cloves in small bowl. Beat eggs in large bowl. Stir in pumpkin and sugar-spice mixture. Gradually stir in evaporated milk. POUR into gluten-free pie shell. BAKE in preheated 425° F oven for 15 minutes. Reduce temperature to 350° F; bake for 40 to 50 minutes or until knife inserted near center comes out clean. Cool on wire rack for 2 hours. Serve immediately or refrigerate. Top with whipped cream before serving.
  14. 5-6 cups cubed and dehydrated Food For Life Rice Almond Bread 2 Tbs. olive oil 3 cups chopped celery (or 1-2 Tbs. celery seed) 2 cups chopped onions 1 tsp. salt 1-2 tsp. cilantro 1-2 tsp. thyme 1-2 tsp. sage black pepper 1-2 Cups gluten-free Chicken Broth Prepare 1 to 2 cups gluten-free chicken broth. Prepare Food For Life Rice Almond Bread as follows: Cut into ½ cubes and put in food dehydrator for 8 hours (or put on cookie sheet and in oven on the lowest temperature for about 2-3 hours). Sauté chopped celery & onions in 2 TBS oil in large frying pan over medium heat until soft. Add spices & pepper as desired to taste. Pour in chicken broth & simmer over low heat for 15-20 min. Stir in bread until fully saturated in sauce & seasonings. Place in 400°F oven for 40-50 min, covering as needed with aluminum foil, until done. If you want to cook the stuffing inside the turkey add only 1 cup of Chicken broth.
  15. Celiac.com 11/12/2008 - It's not as hard as you might think! It's easy to start with the big items—a gluten-free turkey, gluten-free stuffing, gluten-free pumpkin pie, and of course, gluten-free gravy. All are easily achievable by the average home cook, and no one will be able to tell anything is different or unusual—just a lovingly prepared meal full of flavor. Order an organic turkey from New Seasons or Whole Foods in plenty of time, or choose a less expensive option such as Norbest, Riverside, or Honeysuckle White (my favorite). Some commercially produced turkeys contain gluten in the broth used to inject them full of flavorings, salt, and fat. It is important to avoid eating gluten with your conscientiously prepared meal by choosing a gluten-free turkey as your centerpiece. Check the label and it should say no MSG and no gluten on the front or under the nutrition label on the back. Season turkey with high quality herbs like sage, thyme, and rosemary, or go Latin with cumin, chilies, and lime, but forgo additional salt. Most turkeys are pre-salted—some excessively so. The turkeys I surveyed at my discount grocer ranged in Sodium Content/Serving from 160 mg. to 325 mg. Honeysuckle White, which I cooked at my Thanksgiving Prep class, had 200 mg. and I did not need to add any salt when cooking. It was moist, flavorful, and delicious. Gluten-free stuffing is easy, just buy or make the best gluten-free bread, cube it and dry in a low temperature oven. Angeline's bread, available locally here in the Pacific Northwest, makes excellent stuffing (it does contain milk powder). You can also make a wild rice/brown rice and dried cranberry pilaf style stuffing, which can be cooked separately, or used to stuff the bird. You can make terrific stuffing using my recipe for focaccia bread, available in my Thanksgiving Planner (see below). Use sweet rice flour to replace the traditional wheat flour in thickening gravy. If it's not quite thick enough you can add a little tapioca or potato starch. I’ll inject a note of caution here, for those folks with gluten-related bladder problems. If you still have a sensitive bladder, take it easy on the cranberry sauce. I know, it’s recommended to prevent bladder problems, but in reality, it is quite harsh on the bladders of those who already have them. You may be able to tolerate a little apple cider, though, and herb tea is a good option, especially some nettle leaf tea before you have dinner, whether it’s one you’re preparing or not—nettle leaf can help to minimize any food sensitivity reactions you may have, although it can’t prevent a reaction to gluten, so do maintain your gluten-free diet, and don’t be afraid to ask your host or hostess about ingredients. It’s best to do it before-hand rather than at the dinner table. Think about how relaxed you’ll be if you already have your game plan when you get to the table, and know exactly what you can eat, and which dishes you’ll need to politely pass on to the next guest. For pumpkin pie, all you really need to do is make a killer pie crust and make sure your filling is dairy free if necessary. You can substitute Earth Balance for regular margarine—it's gluten-free and dairy-free, or if you tolerate dairy products, use butter. Or, you can use oil to make pie crust. I’ll include recipes for both crusts, and the pies, here. To replace milk in your pumpkin custard for the pie, there are many options to choose from: rice, soy, almond, hazelnut, or hemp, but for extra richness, try coconut milk—it has a very mild taste and won't overwhelm the pumpkin flavor. I'm very happy with the recipe I included in my Thanksgiving Planner & Recipe Guide. Poached pears or other fruit make a lovely alternative to pie, especially when prepared with the finest ingredients and served in an attractive dessert bowl. I use my Mom’s retro 1940’s curvy glass bowl, which always brings back happy memories. No, I wasn’t actually around yet when she got the bowl! Here’s the menu for my 2008 Thanksgiving dinner: Sangria with Cranberries Yeasted Pumpkin Bread Traditional Roasted Thanksgiving Turkey Traditional Tukey-Sage Stuffing (Made with Focaccia Bread) Traditional Turkey Gravy Mashed Yukon Gold Potatoes Yam Gratin with Spiced Pecans Green Salad with Satsumas, Avocados, And Lime Dressing Wild-Rice-Cranberry-Pecan Pilaf (Alternate Stuffing) Oven Roasted Green Beans or Asparagus Cranberry Pineapple Salsa Pumpkin Pie with Coconut Whipped Cream (Optional) To view my Thanksgiving menu, or order my Thanksgiving Planner & Recipe Guide, go to my Gluten-Free Choice Web site (see the link in my biography on the upper-right), and look under the “Gluten Free Resource Guide” tab. At the bottom of the page, below the Thanksgiving Menu, you’ll see how to order the guide. TWO GLUTEN-FREE PIE CRUSTS Tender Gluten-Free Pie Crust (Adapted from Karen Robertson) Ingredients: 1 ¼ cup gluten-free flour blend (+ up to 1 tablespoon more as needed) ¼ cup tapioca starch ¼ cup potato starch 1 ½ teaspoon guar gum or 1 ¼ teaspoon xanthan gum, not both 2 teaspoons fructose 9 tablespoons Earth Balance Vegan margarine or shortening* 1 large egg + 1 egg yolk 1 ½ tablespoons apple cider vinegar or cold water (if using shortening, add ½ teaspoon salt) Directions: Mix together dry ingredients, then cut in margarine or shortening carefully until there are no lumps larger than pea-size. Beat together the eggs, and water or vinegar. Make a well in dry ingredients and add egg and liquid mixture, stirring carefully with fork to combine. When dough is just barely beginning to hold together, turn out onto a floured surface and flatten and fold, and flatten and fold again. Do not overwork dough. Roll out carefully between wax paper. Remove top sheet of wax paper, and invert crust into pan. Using wax paper, press crust into pan and form, then remove wax paper. Use a similar technique for top crust if using. SOY-FREE, EGG-FREE OIL-BASED PIE CRUST (Adapted from Betty Hagman’s recipe)Ingredients: 1 cup gluten-free flour blend ½ cup potato starch ½ cup sweet rice flour 3 teaspoons xanthan gum 1 teaspoon salt 2 teaspoons fructose 3 tablespoons cold rice milk 2/3 cup vegetable oil Directions: Mix together all dry ingredients, then mix together rice milk and oil. Make well in dry ingredients and add rice milk/oil mixture, stirring gently with fork to combine. Proceed as directed in previous recipe. PUMKIN PIE (Gluten-Free) Choose either one of the pie crust dough and make as directed. Place in pie plate, and carefully cover inside of crust with foil. Fill pie crust with dried beans or rice, and pre-bake crust about 10 minutes at 350. When edges are set, remove foil and beans, and bake another 5 minutes, or until bottom crust is beginning to crisp slightly. Here’s the filling: This makes enough for two 8 inch pies, so if you’re only doing one, cut it in half. Filling Ingredients: 2 15-ounce cans of pumpkin, not pumpkin pie filling, or 1 29-ounce can of pumpkin 4 whole eggs 2 tablespoons gluten-free flour blend 1 teasoon sea salt 1 teasoon cinnamon ¼ teasoon cloves ½ teasoon allspice 1 teasoon ginger ½ cup fructose 1/3 cup dark agave syrup 2 teasoons vanilla extract 2/3 cup full fat (not light) coconut milk 2/3 cup unsweetened rice or almond milk Directions: If making only half the recipe, you can make this in the blender, which is very quick and easy, and also makes it easier to pour into the crust. The full recipe will exceed the capacity of most blenders. Mix all ingredients together in large mixing bowl, in approximately the order they are listed. Blend until thoroughly mixed. Pour into pre-baked pie shell, and bake for fifty minutes at 325. Remember to reduce oven temperature after pre-baking the pie shells. Check for doneness every 5 minutes thereafter, by inserting a paring knife into the pie; it should come out clean. FOCACCIA BREAD WITH CARAMELIZED ONIONS Prepare liquid ingredients in a small bowl: 1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar 1 tablespoon fructose 1 tablespoon agave syrup 1/3 cup vegetable oil (light tasting olive oil works well) 2 eggs + 1 egg white at room temperature, or equivalent egg substitute (Ener-G foods, or flax seed & boiling water – beaten with fork until foamy) 1 ¾ cups warm milk substitute (rice milk etc.) (110-115 degrees) …and prepare dry ingredients in separate bowl, combining with whisk 1 package active dry yeast (equiv. to 1 tablespoon) + 1 teaspoon yeast 1 teaspoon fructose 3 ¼ cups all purpose baking mix (2 parts brown rice flour, 1 part sorghum flour, 1 part tapioca starch, ½ part potato starch) ¼ cup teff flour ¾ cup amaranth flour 4 teaspoons guar gum 1 ½ teaspoons salt ¾ teaspoon garlic powder Directions: Combine all wet ingredients and beat together with whisk. Add flour mixture all at once, stirring on low until combined. Increase speed to medium and beat for 3 full minutes. Let dough rest in bowl, covered with towel for 10 minutes, and it will firm up slightly. Wash and dry hands, then coat with gluten-free cooking spray. Scoop 2 equal portions of dough onto prepared pizza pans, sprayed lightly with cooking spray. Pat dough into smooth round, and begin to work dough out into a round about ½” thick and about 10 inches in diameter. When dough begins to stick to hands, rinse hands in warm water, shake it off, then continue to spread dough. When dough reaches desired shape and size, use fingers to lightly dimple dough, and sprinkle lightly with granulated garlic. Cover with towel, and place in warm, draft-free place to rise for 40 minutes. Preheat oven to 375F and bake for 8-10 minutes. Remove bread from oven and brush with olive oil - add caramelized* onions and return to oven for an additional 10-15 minutes. *To caramelize onions, place 1 tablespoon olive oil over medium heat, Add 2 cups sliced sweet onions; cook slowly, stirring often until softened and taking on dark caramel color. This cooking process basically released the sugars from the onions. You can add a little water, wine, or chicken broth to prevent sticking to bottom of pan. Also be sure to scrape bottom of pan well each time you stir during cooking.
  16. Celiac.com 10/25/2008 - With a bit of planning and knowledge anyone with celiac disease can enjoy a safe, gluten-free Thanksgiving and holiday season without the concern of accidental gluten ingestion. If you plan to prepare your own gluten-free turkey dinner, here are some ideas that may be helpful: A gluten-free holiday dinner starts with a gluten-free turkey. Believe it or not some brands of turkey do contain additives that are not gluten-free—so, like everything else, read the ingredients and use our Gluten-Free Ingredient Lists or our Gluten-Free Shopping Guides to help you shop. Don’t risk gluten-based stuffing in your turkey. Instead, try my favorite gluten-free stuffing recipe. Gravy is easy: Use a gluten-free gravy mix, or a gluten-free gravy recipe. Remember, bouillon cubes can often be a source of hidden gluten in holiday meals so be sure to use gluten-free bouillon cubes. To thicken your homemade gravy you can use corn starch or arrowroot flour. Gluten-free holiday side dishes are easy: Browse our extensive listing of gluten-free recipes to find side dishes that will impress anyone—celiac disease or not. Order gluten-free baking ingredients and other hard-to-find items like prepared gluten-free pies ahead of time for convenience—this will allow you to spend more time with friends and family rather than spending all of your time in the kitchen! Many excellent prepared gluten-free products can now be ordered and delivered directly to your door from places like the Gluten-Free Mall. If you plan to eat out, or at a relative’s or friend’s house during the holidays, you might find this information helpful: Ali Demeritte's blog entry: The Dinner Party Drama—Two Guidelines to Assure a Pleasant Gluten-Free Experience. Danna Korn's article: Venturing Out of the House: Restaurant Realities. Aimee Eiguren's blog entry: Eating Out Gluten-Free and Without Fear. Chef Daniel Moran's article: Traveling and Eating Gluten-Free at Restaurants. Chef Daniel Moran's article: Traveling and Eating Gluten-Free Meals at Small or Moving Restaurants. The holiday season can stressful enough without having to worry about gluten in your meals. Hopefully the tips in this article will help you eliminate this concern, and allow you to have a safe and relaxed gluten-free holiday!
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