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Found 10 results

  1. Celiac.com 11/19/2008 - Day Four: After a ride on a local public bus, which hugged the narrow road's teetering edge and rounded hairpin curves with an alarming sense of speed, we felt grateful for the solid earth beneath our feet in Positano. Our first order of business was to check into the Hotel Villa Rosa and find a nearby trattoria to fill our grumbling stomachs! One of the staff, Stefania, recommended Caffè Positano on the Fornillo side of the town and arranged for a courtesy taxi to deposit us at its doorstep. Without a doubt, its chief allure was the alfresco terrace facing the sea. Situated across the road from the main restaurant and kitchen, the terrace held a dozen or so umbrella-topped tables and beckoned foreigners with unforgettable views. Jill: We decided to share an enormous plate of salty prosciutto and cold sweet melon as an appetizer. Jeff ordered pesce spada griglia (grilled swordfish) and I chose petto di pollo aceto (grilled chicken with a balsamic vinaigrette, parmesan and arugula). We nibbled at each other's dishes and savored every bite of that culinary welcoming, so much so that we'd find ourselves back for more during our stay. Days later, upon seeing zuppa di verdura (minestrone soup) on the menu, Jeff asked how it was prepared. Our server confirmed it did not contain any noodles/macaroni or gluten, and Jeff was pleased to have his fill of the strictly vegetable-based soup, which we learned is how minestrone is typically prepared in the region. Experimental cook that he is, Jeff was eager already to replicate the recipe when we returned home to San Francisco. Jeff: The Villa Rosa provided an ample gluten-free breakfast. Each morning my tray included a gluten-free chocolate croissant and gluten-free toast with butter and jam, along with our usual assortment of coffee, tea and yogurt. After we finished a late breakfast, lounging at the beach was one of our favorite things to do. Like many beach areas, lunch fare leaned toward sandwiches, pizzas and the like. The few restaurants tended to be overpriced, but we found a reliable alternative in the salumeria, the Italian version of the delicatessen which means "cured meat shop." It had a variety of cheeses, meats and salads priced by the kilo. In addition to fresh pasta and pasta salads, the place usually had salads that were pasta-free and gluten-free. Also, once I discovered that French fries were readily accessible (yes, in Italy) and the minestrone was, in my experience, always gluten-free, I knew I had a reliable fallback. This reinforced my confidence and led us to make an exception of avoiding sit-down lunches near the beach. We tried La Cambusa, where the waiter called us by our city of origin: Mr. and Mrs. San Francisco. I had my staple fallback meal, and Jill snacked on a tasty ham and cheese omelet that she washed down with a glass of prosecco. Jill: While most of our experiences were positive, we had a few missteps along the way. During our first evening at a beach snack shop, Jeff ordered saltimbocca, a dish generally prepared with rolled veal, prosciutto or ham and cooked in a wine and butter sauce. However, what he ended up with was a sandwich version, pressed between thick slabs of bread, that I stuck in our fridge for my lunch the following day. Another time for dinner, we visited Donna Rosa, a family-run trattoria perched high in the hills of nearby Montepertuso, where the locals know to go to eat well and on the cheap. For an appetizer we chose scallops which, to our consternation, were lightly dusted with a bread-crumb gratin that wasn't described on the menu. These surprises could have been averted, though, if we hadn't let down our guard and relied too heavily on the menu. Ultimately, these experiences nudged us to remember to ask questions upfront and not get too comfortable. Day Nine: When we arrived in the more isolated fishing village of Praiano, a veritable country cousin to cosmopolite Positano, Jeff plopped down in the pastel-hued restaurant of the Hotel Margherita mere minutes after dropping his bags. He was famished and awaited a sumptuous plate of spaghetti posillipo, made with the hotel's gluten-free spaghetti and mushrooms. In fact, Jeff was so enamored with the heaping dish of gluten-free goodness that he borrowed my digital camera to snap a photo and in a flurry of excitement accidentally erased all of our other pictures! Well, at least we've got the memories... The Hotel Margherita proprietor Suela and her husband Andrea were also attentive to Jeff's breakfast needs. In addition to the standard buffet that had a generous gluten-free assortment of eggs, deli meat, cheeses, yogurt, coffee and tea, they purchased extras for Jeff, including a sweet, gluten-free lemon muffin and gluten-free toast. Jeff: On the Vettica side of Praiano, the Trattoria San Gennaro was a brisk fifteen-minute walk from the hotel and sat above the main piazza and church. The view from the terrace was both panoramic and quaint, with the Mediterranean offsetting glittering Positano at night and the piazza coming alive with families sitting about while their children played soccer. The place had been recommended by a kind gentleman named Nicola who works at the Villa Rosa in Positano and lives in Praiano. The restaurant served the best bowl of gluten-free minestrone yet! It was so big I have described it as a “tankard” of soup, loaded with fresh vegetables. Though, you do need to ask the kitchen to hold off on the freshly toasted bread garnish. I’ve rarely been so completely well- fed as when I ordered the fries, minestrone and local fish specialty for dinner on our first night. We lingered well into the night, sipping the local wine and taking in the smell of the sea. Day Twelve: Perched on the cliffs, Ravello is often heralded for its gardens, Villa Rufulo and Villa Cimbrone, and has played host to departing Crusaders, famous authors and numerous other visitors throughout history. The town's stone walls, quaint walkways and tight, cobblestone streets exude the charm of antiquity. Gluten-free dining proved to be equally simple here. We arrived at the Hotel Graal early afternoon and were starving after two long cramped bus rides from Praiano. We headed to the restaurant, where the maître d' guided us to a shaded table on the terrace. Soon we lunched on gluten-free mushroom penne pasta and salad and took in stunning views of the ocean and the nearby seaside village of Minori. Jill: Perusing our guidebook, we found a trattoria tucked away beyond the main piazza called Cumpa' Cosimo and decided to give it a try for dinner. Thankfully we'd made a reservation, as the medieval-inspired place that was dotted with pictures of celebrities and run by Italian nonna (grandmother) Netta Bottone filled up fast. Everything on the menu looked enticing. The roasted rabbit caught Jeff's eye, along with more minestrone soup. He couldn't seem to get enough of the stuff! Craving comfort food, I bypassed the local specialties for a four-cheese pizza and glass of beer. After trying a bit of Jeff's entrée, though, I had a serious case of rabbit envy! We were pushing our last-bite limits when Netta paraded over to our table with a complimentary dessert, something like a cross between cheesecake and tiramisù, which Jeff picked at in order to avoid the crust (Celiac.com does not recommend doing this), and I couldn't resist polishing off. When Jeff mentioned that he was a writer as we paid our tab, Netta darted back to the kitchen and returned with a plate of figs and grapes. From her garden, she said, and insisted we put them in our pockets for later. Day Fourteen: Rome may be the Eternal City, but we had all of a day and a half there to explore, with the half starting after our nine-hour transit by private car, Amtrak train and then a female Formula One taxi driver at Termini Station. Since the next day was Sunday and we had no desire to fight the faithful who would attend mass, we opted for a quick visit to St. Peter's and from there trotted over to the Trastevere district for dinner. The Trastevere, a bohemian counterpart to New York's East Village, is one of my favorite places and it won over Jill, who hadn't quite been captured by the Roman magic. Even in August when the area was thick with tourists, street vendors and buskers, it seemed like a breath of fresh air in a city that can be every bit as overbearing as New York or London. We eyeballed a few menus and sniffed out a crowded place that seemed to move food at a good clip. It was elbow-to-elbow seating at our cramped alleyway table, with throngs of tourists shuffling past, but soon we dined under a blue Roman sky at dusk. We enjoyed a flavorful gluten-free meal of fresh salads, veal marsala, mushroom risotto and handmade local sausages. Despite being stuffed already, we couldn't resist some stracciatella (chocolate chip) and nocciola (hazelnut) gelato near the Piazza Santa Maria, where a polished quartet of young classical musicians serenaded the crowd. In general, we noticed an abundance of gluten-free salads, soups, roasted meats and risottos in Rome and in all four towns we passed through along the Amalfi Coast. We found reliable delis and easy access to fresh fruit. When we asked, places that did not have gluten-free pasta showed a willingness to prepare any that you provided. So, with a quick trip to the local pharmacy for some gluten-free pasta, you could dine with confidence! Contrary to our fears before the trip, eating gluten-free while traveling in Italy proved easy to do. With a bit of planning, a call to the airline to line up a gluten-free meal, an Italian/English explanation of your dietary needs and the standard caution nearly all people with gluten intolerance bring to eating out, anyone can look forward to an enjoyable, gluten-free holiday in Italy. Co-written by Jefferson Adams
  2. Celiac.com 07/05/2017 - Numerous researchers have documented a connection between celiac disease and type 1 diabetes. One team of researchers recently set out to examine international differences in celiac disease rates and clinical characteristics of youth with coexisting type 1 diabetes and celiac disease compared with type 1 diabetes only. The research team included Maria E. Craig, Nicole Prinz, Claire T. Boyle, Fiona M. Campbell, Timothy W. Jones, Sabine E. Hofer, Jill H.Simmons, Naomi Holman, Elaine Tham, Elke Fröhlich-Reiterer, Stephanie DuBose, Helen Thornton, Bruce King, David M. Maahs, Reinhard W. Holl and Justin T. Warner. To analyze the relationship between outcomes, including HbA1c, height-standard deviation score [sDS], overweight/obesity, and type 1 diabetes with celiac disease versus type 1 diabetes alone, adjusting for sex, age, and diabetes duration, the team created multivariable linear and logistic regression models. The analysis included 52,721 people under 18 years of age with a clinic visit between April 2013 and March 2014. The team used the following data sources: the Prospective Diabetes Follow-up registry (Germany/Austria); the T1D Exchange Clinic Network (T1DX) (U.S.); the National Paediatric Diabetes Audit (U.K. [England/Wales]); and the Australasian Diabetes Data Network (ADDN) (Australia). The researchers found biopsy-confirmed celiac disease in 1,835 young people, or 3.5%. These patients were diagnosed on average at age 8.1 years, with a range of 5.3 to 11.2 years. Most young people (37%) with diabetes upon celiac disease diagnosis had it for less than one year. Eighteen percent with diabetes had it for 1-2 years at celiac diagnosis, 23% had diabetes between 3 and 5 years at celiac diagnosis, while 17% had diabetes for more than 5 years at celiac diagnosis. Celiac disease rates ranged from 1.9% in the T1DX to 7.7% in the ADDN and were higher in girls than boys (4.3% vs. 2.7%, P < 0.001). Children with coexisting celiac disease were diagnosed with diabetes at 5.4 years on average, compared with those with type 1 diabetes only, who were diagnosed at 7.0 years of age, on average. Also, fewer children with both conditions were non-white, 15 vs. 18%. Height-SDS was lower in those with celiac disease (0.36 vs. 0.48) and fewer were overweight/obese (34 vs. 37%, adjusted P < 0.001), whereas average HbA1c values were comparable: 8.3 ± 1.5% (67 ± 17 mmol/mol) versus 8.4 ± 1.6% (68 ± 17 mmol/mol). This study clearly documented that celiac disease is not uncommon in young people with type 1 diabetes. Differences in disease rates may be due to variations in screening and diagnostic practices, and/or risk levels. Although the groups showed similar glycemic control, the research team encourages close monitoring of growth and nutrition in this population, due to the lower height-SDS. Source: Diabetes Care 2017 May; dc162508. The researchers in this study are variously affiliated with the Children’s Hospital at Westmead, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Charles Perkins Centre Westmead, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Institute of Epidemiology and Medical Biometry, University of Ulm, Ulm, Germany; German Center for Diabetes Research, Munich-Neuherberg, Germany; Jaeb Center for Health Research, Tampa, FL; Leeds Children’s Hospital, Leeds, U.K.; The University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia; Telethon Kids Institute, Perth, Australia; Department of Pediatrics, Medical University of Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria; Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN; Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, U.K.; Women’s and Children’s Hospital, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia; Department of Pediatrics, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria; St. Helens and Knowsley Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, St. Helens, U.K.; John Hunter Children’s Hospital, Hunter Medical Research Institute, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, New South Wales, Australia; Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital Stanford, Stanford University Medical Center, Palo Alto, CA; and the Children's Hospital for Wales, Cardiff, U.K.
  3. Today I had the pleasure of trying out two new products from Three Bakers Gluten Free: Chocolate Chip Snackers and Honey Graham Snackers, and I'm very impressed by both. Just as the "Snackers" name implies, these new products make a perfect snack. The texture of Snackers is a bit like a cracker, bit their taste is more like a cookie. I really like the fact that the first ingredient is whole grain brown rice flour, which has more fiber and nutritional value than plain rice flour. The Honey Graham Snackers had an identical flavor to regular wheat graham crackers that I've missed so much. You can really tasted the honey graham flavor. The Chocolate Chip Snackers tasted remarkably like a great chocolate chip cookie, but again, these have the consistency of crackers, so you never get the feeling that they are too sweet or unhealthy. Overall I highly recommend these new treats to anyone, regardless of whether or not they avoid gluten, as they will be enjoyed by all. I will also be including them as a treat in my daughter's school lunches because she absolutely loves them! For more info visit their site.
  4. Celiac.com 10/27/2015 - In 2006, I presented a research paper called "Who warrants a gluten-free diet?". At that time I was thinking about the sick children who were coming through my clinic with skin, gut and brain symptoms: that is they had eczema and itchy skin; sore tummies and constipation; and behaviour disturbances. It turned out that most of this group of children had high levels of Anti-Gliadin-Antibodies (AGA), of whom 80% got completely better when they went on a gluten-free diet. This was a landmark paper for me, and it led me to describe "The Gluten Syndrome". However, that was nearly 10 years ago! and a lot has happened since then. Perhaps most notable the publication of the consensus paper on the Spectrum of Gluten-Related-Disorders. The algorithm developed to diagnose gluten sensitivity/ intolerance relies on the elimination and challenge of gluten, rather than immunologic blood tests. I have been using the AGA test in my clinic since 1989 (that is for 25 years!) and I have found it extremely useful as a diagnostic test, when it is positive. But, many people react to gluten and have negative AGA results. So I agree with the authors of the "Spectrum" paper. The basis of a gluten-sensitivity/intolerance diagnosis should be based on elimination and challenge. Importantly, prior to removing gluten from your diet, please ensure that you get the appropriate tests for celiac disease (see this link for a gluten-blood-test discussion). So who in the year 2015 should be suspected of having a gluten-related-illness? Well anyone who has chronic symptoms. Even if they have a diagnostic label - because they might have the wrong diagnosis. so here are the 3 steps in my gluten-free logic: Step ONE - the premise IF: a) Gluten sensitivity is common: estimates show it affects over 10% of the population; Gluten-related illnesses are varied and have multiple symptoms: a quote from the consensus paper on the Spectrum of Gluten-Related-Disorders emphasizes this. The symptoms in gluten sensitivity may resemble those associated with celiac disease but with a prevalence of extra-intestinal symptoms, such as behavioral changes, bone or joint pain, muscle cramps, leg numbness, weight loss and chronic fatigue. Their symptoms include abdominal pain (68%); eczema and/or rash (40%); headache (35%); "foggy mind" (34%); fatigue (33%); diarrhea (33%); depression (22%); anemia (20%); numbness in the legs, arms or fingers 20%; and joint pain (11%); c) There is no definitive diagnostic test for gluten sensitivity: the Consensus paper goes on to say "However, currently there are no laboratory biomarkers specific for gluten sensitivity. Usually the diagnosis is based on exclusion criteria; an elimination diet of gluten-containing foods followed by an open challenge is most often used to evaluate whether health improves with the elimination or reduction of gluten from the patient’s diet"; d) There is no harm from going on a gluten-free diet; in other words a gluten-free is healthy. Step TWO - The logical THEN: Then the logical conclusion is that "anyone", with "any symptoms" that are "chronic and unexplained" (that is they do not have a definite diagnosis) and "at any time" (people can develop gluten-illness at any time in their life) should be put onto a gluten-free diet for a clinical trial for three months or more. Step THREE - The CONCLUSION: The logical conclusion is that whatever the blood-test results, and whatever the endoscopy results, and whatever the symptoms, a beneficial response to a gluten-free diet suggests that their illness is gluten-related (some people might demand a double blind food challenge). Comment Up until now, most gluten/celiac doctors have dismissed the idea that their patients might be suffering from "non-celiac gluten-sensitivity" (NCGS). They have attributed their patients beneficial response to a gluten-free diet as a placebo response (all in their head!). This is clearly not the case. There is mounting evidence for this: see this research paper - Small Amounts of Gluten in Subjects with Suspected Nonceliac Gluten Sensitivity: a Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Cross-Over Trial. In this paper the authors conclude: "In a cross-over trial of subjects with suspected NCGS, the severity of overall symptoms increased significantly during 1 week of intake of small amounts of gluten, compared with placebo". The above logic means that ALL people, with ANY undiagnosed illnesses, at any TIME in their life, should be given a gluten-free trial. This is likely to have huge health benefits and wide ramifications on the management and burden of ill health on the community. Already 10% of Australians and Canadian are adopting a gluten-free diet, and 30% percent of adults in the USA are interested in avoiding or cutting down on gluten in their diets, says a survey from the NPD Group, a consumer research firm. NDP has been following gluten-free issues since 2009 and its January 2013 survey revealed the highest interest in gluten-free diets yet (reported in HuffPost - 26 Feb 2015). It is my prediction that in another generation most people who wish to stay healthy, will choose to adopt a gluten-free diet, before they get harmed by gluten.
  5. South Med J. 2004;97:30-34 Celiac.com 03/30/2004 – According to Umaprasanna S. Karnam, MD (University of Miami School of Medicine in Florida), and colleagues, celiac disease is present in around 3% of iron-deficiency anemia cases. The researchers looked at all patients seen at the University of Miami for iron-deficiency anemia between 1998 and 2000. Iron-deficiency anemia was defined in their study as serum ferritin less than 25 ng/mL and hemoglobin less than 12 g/dL for women and less than 14 g/dL for men. Interestingly, patients with prior documented ulcerative or erosive conditions of the gastrointestinal tract or overt gastrointestinal bleeding during the prior three months were excluded (which means that many with advanced celiac disease would have been excluded from this study). Out of 139 possible patients with iron-deficiency anemia, 105 patients were included in the study (57 men and 48 women). According to the researchers: The prevalence of occult celiac disease in this prospective study of patients presenting with iron-deficiency anemia was 2.8%. A significant number of other gastrointestinal lesions amenable to therapy were also found on upper and lower endoscopy in these patients, the authors write. Given the treatable nature of celiac disease, it should be screened for in patients with unexplained iron-deficiency anemia with or without hemoccult-positive stools. The investigators recommend panendoscopy and screening for this treatable condition in unexplained cases. It is likely that had the study included patients with gastrointestinal bleeding or ulcerative conditions the rate of celiac disease would have been higher, perhaps as high as 5%.
  6. Celiac.com 03/11/2014 - Here's an easy to make recipe for Thai-style chicken that combines three sauces, onions, peppers, garlic, and, of course, plenty of basil. If you like chicken, and you like basil, and you're open to Asian-style dishes, you will likely enjoy this tasty chicken dish. I like to serve it over rice, and I sometimes pair it with a nice Thai-style vegetable curry. Ingredients: 1 pound boneless skinless chicken breast halves, sliced ¼-inch thick 2 small red bell peppers, cut into ¼-inch-wide strips 1 tablespoon cornstarch 1 cup fresh basil leaves, lightly chopped 1 small onion, halved and cut into ¼-inch-thick wedges 1 teaspoon chopped garlic 1 teaspoon red pepper flakes coconut oil, for stir-fying cilantro springs for garnish salt and pepper to taste Sauce 1 2 tablespoons gluten-free fish sauce 2 teaspoons sugar 2 tablespoons gluten-free soy sauce Sauce 2 2 tablespoons gluten-free oyster sauce (Lee Kum Kee - Choy Sun) 4 tablespoons water 1 teaspoon chili paste Sauce 3 1 teaspoon cornstarch 2 tablespoons water Directions: Rinse chicken pieces and pat dry with paper towels. In a medium bowl, mix cornstarch, salt and pepper. Toss in chicken strips and toss until well-coated with cornstarch. Heat oil in wok. Stir-fry onions and peppers until soft. Remove and keep warm. Add oil to wok as needed and stir-fry chicken, garlic, and pepper flakes until chicken is done. Add sauces in order, stirring each time to fully coat. Add cooked vegetables back and stir to coat. Add basil, stirring just until hot-crisp, and beginning to wilt. Garnish with cilantro and serve immediately over rice.
  7. Celiac.com 04/05/2013 - One in three adults want to avoid or cut down on gluten in their diets, says a survey from the consumer research firm, NPD Group. NDP began asking consumers about gluten-free issues in 2009, and the responses for their January 2013 survey show the highest level of interest in gluten-free diets so far. NDP's chief industry analyst, Harry Balzer, said in a recent press release that avoiding gluten is the "health issue of the day," and compared the current efforts to avoid or reduce dietary gluten to efforts a generation ago to avoid fat, cholesterol, sugar and sodium. Specifically, Balzer said: a "generation ago, health was about avoiding fat, cholesterol, sugar and sodium in our diet. While those desires still exist for many, they no longer are growing concerns…Today, increasingly more of us want to avoid gluten in our diet and right now it is nearly 30 percent of the adult population...and it’s growing." Gluten-free foods are now a $4.2 billion a year industry, and interest has extended to the restaurant industry as well. NPD found that 200 million restaurant visits in the past year included a gluten-free order. “The number of U.S. adults who say they are cutting down on or avoiding gluten is too large for restaurant operators to ignore,” said Bonnie Riggs, a restaurant industry analyst for NDP, in the same release. Currently, some three million Americans have been diagnosed with celiac disease, which is now is four times more common than it was 50 years ago. While the rise in diagnosis and awareness of gluten-intolerance and celiac disease continues to fuel popularity of gluten-free diets, the supposed health benefits of eliminating gluten are also a factor. It is certainly true that some of this gluten-free diet trend has been triggered by pop culture and media celebrities, many of whom are not eating gluten-free out of medical necessity. Still, it's likely that the gluten-free trend will continue into the foreseeable future, at least. Source: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/03/06/gluten-free-diet_n_2818954.html
  8. In fall, I like to make up a big batch of this tasty buffalo chili for my guests. I like to serve it with big pieces of gluten-free corn bread with butter and lots of honey. This low-fat chili is easy to delicious, easy to throw together, and goes great with gluten-free beer. Makes 8-10 servings Ingredients: 1 pound buffalo stew meat, cubed 1 pound ground buffalo 6 ounces dry black beans 6 ounces dry kidney beans 6 ounces dry pinto beans 2 teaspoons ground cumin 1 teaspoon ground cumin (for meat) 1 teaspoon ground cayenne pepper (for meat) 10 ounces diced tomatoes 1 small can chopped green chiles 2 (10.75 ounce) cans tomato sauce ¼ cup cream 1 large sweet onion, chopped ½ teaspoon minced garlic 1 Anaheim chile pepper, chopped 1 poblano chile pepper, chopped 1 tablespoons chili powder 1 teaspoon red pepper flakes 1 jalapeno pepper, seeded, minced salt and pepper to taste 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 bottle (12 ounces) gluten-free beer Directions: Soak beans in water overnight. Drain and rinse. Brown first the cubed buffalo meat, then the ground buffalo in a large skillet over medium heat. Make sure the cubed pieces are browned on all sides. Once the meat is browned, season with 1 teaspoon cayenne pepper and 1 teaspoon cumin. Remove browned meat to a paper towel and set aside. Drain excess fat from skillet. Add oil to skillet over medium low heat. Saute the onion and peppers for 3 minutes. Add buffalo meat. Stir briefly to mix, and remove from heat. Transfer meat, onions and peppers to large soup pot, or a slow cooker. Stir in diced tomatoes, tomato sauce, tomatoes with green chiles, cream, kidney beans, black beans, onion, garlic, Anaheim chile pepper, poblano chile pepper, chili powder, red pepper flakes, black pepper, and salt. Add gluten-free beer, and enough water to cover the ingredients. Note: For hotter chili, add jalapeno seeds. Cover and cook on low heat overnight or 8 hours, stirring occasionally.
  9. Before I went gluten-free, cous-cous salad was one of my all-time favorites, and I made it often. Cous-Cous is not a grain itself, but a tiny grain-like semolina pasta common in the Middle-Eastern/North African countries, and of course it contains gluten. Now I have re-created three salad recipes using a naturally gluten-free grain called Quinoa (pronounced “keenwa”). This unique grain, or seed, which was a staple food of the Incas in South America due to its stellar nutritional profile, comes in two varieties – plain, and the earthier “Inca Red”. These lively whole-grain salads are easy to prepare for guests, potlucks, and picnics. They keep well, and can be ready in minutes. I usually make the Middle-Eastern version, but sometimes a meal like grilled lamb-chops or herb-roasted chicken works better with the Mediterranean version. The Mediterranean version is also great to make in the summer when fresh herbs and local tomatoes are in season. When fresh corn is in season, I love to make the version with corn and beans, highlighted by red onion and a zip of lime. You simply toss all ingredients together with the quinoa, then with the dressing. Taste and adjust seasoning. Chill salad in refrigerator briefly. Salad can be “refreshed” the next day by adding a small amount of fresh lemon juice or vinegar, and lightly tossing. Enjoy the taste of a wholesome nutritious grain that is safe for anyone with gluten sensitivity, yet easily available in your natural foods market. Quinoa is very adaptable, and you may find yourself coming up with new versions. I’ve tasted quinoa salads with edemame, and bay shrimp, or nori, ginger and dark sesame oil. I can even imagine a quinoa salad with winter squash, walnuts, chopped parsley and sweet onions, and diced apples, using apple cider vinegar and walnut oil. You’ll come up with the best results by making use of locally grown fruits and vegetables in season. Now I can’t wait for those summer tomatoes and corn from my garden! Cook ¾ cup prepared quinoa in 1 ½ cup water, ½ tsp. salt, and 1 TBSP. olive oil until thin ring around seed is visible and grain is tender but not mushy. Drain off any excess water thoroughly. Gently fluff with fork and allow to cool briefly while assembling remaining ingredients. Combine quinoa with the remaining ingredients in whichever recipe you choose. Middle-Eastern Style: ½ cup each: Thinly sliced quartered carrots Dried (Zante) currants Sliced green onions/scallions Finely chopped parsley Sliced almonds, lightly toasted Dressing: 2 TBSP. Apple Cider Vinegar 1 TBSP. freshly squeezed lemon juice or orange juice ¼ cup canola or walnut oil, or light, mild tasting olive oil 1 clove garlic, finely minced or use a garlic press 1 TBSP. honey 1/8 teaspoon curry powder + 1/8 teaspoon cloves ¼ tsp sea salt Mediterranean Style: 1/2 cup each: Thinly sliced diced seeded cucumbers Chopped kalamata olives Sliced green onions/scallions or red onion Diced tomatoes, or halved cherry tomatoes Crumbled sheep-feta cheese (optional) Pine nuts, toasted (optional garnish) Dressing: 2 TBSP. Red Wine Vinegar 1 TBSP. freshly squeezed lemon juice ¼ cup olive oil 2 teaspoons honey 1 teaspoon g.f. Dijon mustard 1 clove garlic, finely minced, or use a garlic press ¼ teaspoon dried Italian seasoning, or pinch each ½ teaspoon garam masala, or dried marjoram & oregano ¼ teaspoon sea salt Dash freshly ground black pepper South of the Border Style: ¾ cup canned or fresh cooked small red beans or black beans ¾ cup frozen sweet white corn kernels, or an equivalent amount of freshly grilled sweet corn kernels cut off the cob ¼ cup finely diced red onion ¼ cup finely chopped cilantro (or substitute fresh basil in season) ½ cup diced fresh tomato (optional) Dressing: ¼ cup each freshly squeezed lime juice 1/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil ¼ teaspoon cumin ½ teaspoon sea salt ¼ teaspoon black pepper Sprinkle of crushed red pepper flakes (to taste, optional) Finely chopped parsley, mint & parsley, or parsley & basil
  10. JAMA 2002;287:1413-1419. Celiac.com 04/12/2002 - According to a report published in the March 20th issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, people with celiac disease are three times more likely to develop non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) than the normal population. Dr. Carlo Catassi and colleagues from the University of Maryland in Baltimore compared the prevalence of celiac disease in 653 NHL patients with more than 5,000 healthy control subjects to determine the NHL-celiac disease occurrence rate. The results indicate that 1% of NHL patients also have celiac disease, in comparison with 0.42% of the healthy controls. Adjustments were made for age and sex, and the final results indicate that the odds ratios for a patient with celiac disease of developing NHL are: 3.1 for all types of NHL, 16.9 for gut NHL, and 19.2 for T-cell NHL. The overall risk, however, for someone with celiac disease developing NHL is only 0.63%. The researchers do not feel that their findings support mass screening for celiac disease, but they do feel that selected NHL patients should be screened for celiac disease. We would also like to add that these findings support the screening of people with celiac disease for NHL, which was not directly addressed by the report.
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