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Found 45 results

  1. Has anyone taken a Hurtigruten cruise of the Norwegian coast? I’m investigating it, and wondered if anyone had first-hand knowledge about the food (how accommodating were they of gluten free diners).
  2. I folks, Have any of you travelled on Princess Cruises with multiple intolerances? I have so many intolerances and right now, I'm very nervous about getting on a ship and having no control over my food. How well does Princess Cruises accommodate those with Celiac & food intolerances? How early should I contact the ship? Please share whatever experiences you have had! Thank you!
  3. All, I am new to this group. I am hoping that I might be able to gain insight from your experience. I was officially diagnosed (blood markers and endoscopy) with celiac disease almost two years ago. Upon diagnosis, I immediately began to make changes in my diet. I was able to cook tasty meals that I was used to with substitutions. Although I am usually able to find a gluten-free meal in restaurants, it is often tasteless and expensive. Worse than that, I have been poisoned several times while traveling or having dinner at a friend's house..... and especially at church potlucks. I will often pack my own food, but I find it socially isolating and really unsatisfying. When I sit at a table with people around me eating delicious gluten laden dishes, I want to cry. I compare it to a recovering drug addict who lives in a crack house. On the occasions that I do inadvertently ingest gluten, and I have been eating "clean", I get catastrophically ill. Not only do I experience lower GI problems, but I also feel sore and feverish..... kind of like when you are coming down with the flu. However, if I am about to travel somewhere where I know I am highly likely to get accidentally poisoned with gluten, I will ramp up several days before. I'll eat tiny amounts (a cracker here, soy sauce, a piece of bread there..... avoiding gluten overload like pasta or gravy) of gluten. I'm pretty sick on the first day, but after that I'm just a little bit sick all of the time. Most importantly, I do not get catastrophically ill on the vacation. I find this an easier state of existence, and wonder if I should consider this during my every day life. Here is my question: If I have officially been diagnosed, and knowingly ingest small amounts of gluten, am I shortening my life? Am I being irresponsible as a patient? Have any of you had these same thoughts? I just really miss my old diet. I was happier before I was diagnosed. I am miserable. Amy
  4. Celiac.com 01/05/2018 - Cuba is abundant with music, color, and people. The countryside is a lush, rich green where fields of sugar cane stretch as far as the eye can see. Streets of Havana are filled with hot pink, lemon yellow, candy-apple red, bright blue and green classic cars. Rural streets have horse drawn carts overflowing with harvested sugar cane and the men (almost always men) with machetes from cutting the crops. It is a country of contradictions, where pillars of ancient affluence intersect with rubble as people yack on cell-phones while throwing their fishing lines off the Malecon. As a multiple-time tourist there, I'm overwhelmed with how friendly people are and how safe I feel, even though my ability to speak Spanish is, well, not-so-good. Given that wifi and internet connections are few and far between, my translation app doesn't work so I'm on my own when it comes to ordering food and figuring out if it's gluten-free or not. Between my Spanish being awful and the fact that menus may not be in English, much less contain a list of ingredients, asking the wait-staff if there are gluten-free menu options is a no-brainer. The communication and interpretation challenges meant that it made no sense for me to ask that question. So how does one go about being gluten-free in Cuba? Actually, it's not so hard once you keep in mind certain facts. One is to understand the traditional daily diet of most Cubans. Food staples include rice, beans, pork, beef, and sometimes chicken. These are all safe for people with Celiac disease. You're likely to find these foods at every meal in every home or restaurant. Cubans do not tend to use a lot of spices because they don't have them; processed foods are generally unavailable which makes food rather bland but on the other side, pretty safe because the chances of being exposed to gluten-filled flavor enhancers aren't around. Breads may be served but they, like the delicious-looking fried dough sold on the street in baskets or papers by local vendors, can be easily avoided. Pasta dishes are found in many restaurants, and the pasta is always wheat so forget asking if they have corn, rice of quinoa pasta. Eggs are pretty easy to find; cheese somewhat, but peanut-butter is not. For many people going gluten-free, vegetables are a life-saver. However, in Cuba this option is something we need to have a serious conversation about. Vegetables are hard to come by. Now, there is a big organic farm program in Cuba. Organopónicos, or organoponics, is a system of urban agriculture using organic gardens that originated in Cuba and is widely used there. The idea is for them to produce organic, highly nutritious vegetables in an efficient way that maximizes the use of natural resources, composting, and recycling. The farm I visited outside of Havana distributes 90% of all the produce to local residents; only 10% goes to hotels and commercial vendors. The organoponics movement is trying to lure Cubans away from their primary reliance on rice, beans and meats into eating more produce. There is a heavy health emphasis related to nutrition there – there are hospitals and health care providers, but they aren't plentiful and tend not to be the first line of health care. Food is a primary vehicle leading to better health. Sweets, salty foods and fats are not nearly as common there, due to the lack of imports of such items in this still largely socialistic country. Foods are simpler, and seem to be more “real”, if you get my drift. Since Cuba is an island, fresh fish is a good choice for meals. If you order a salad, expect them to be small and consisting primarily of lettuce (not iceberg!), thinly sliced cucumbers, and maybe a bit of grated cabbage. Don't go looking for tomatoes, broccoli, carrots, potatoes, Brussel sprouts, squashes or kale. Chances are low that you'll find them. It's more likely that when you find vegetables, they are present more as garnish. Fruits, on the other hand, can be easily purchased at corner open-air markets where farmers bring bananas, plantains, pineapple, mangos, papaya, and coconuts. They are beautiful and fresh, and can be served on plates as main foods, garnishes and certainly as juices. Food isn't why one goes to Cuba. Mojitos and rum may be (thank God they are gluten free!), cigars are a draw, and a tiny cup of their coffee will keep you rolling all day. People who have to go gluten-free have often gotten used to watching what they eat and having limited options, so in this regard traveling to Cuba is no different. In some ways it's a bit easier because of the lack of processed foods and fancy, hidden ingredients that make their way into both gourmet and convenience foods in the United States. Cuba is more of a what-you-see-is-what-you-get culinary world. Gourmet cuisine hasn't arrived there yet. Neither have fast food items that U.S. people have come to take for granted. It's not uncommon to overhear people at the airport planning what they're going to eat when they get back to the states. My advice for anyone going gluten free in Cuba is to pack some nuts, dried fruit, protein bars, and easy-to-keep-and-transport favorite gluten-free food options. Expect when you go out for breakfast to have fruit and eggs. Dinner will likely be a meat/chicken/fish that is simply prepared so it should not usually be a gluten issue. Rice and beans are usually cooked without much seasoning, so you're probably safe eating them. Definitely avoid anything that is deep fried, because chances are high that a bread was cooked in the oil. Plantains that are fried are probably safe because they are cooked in butter or oil in a skillet. Fresh fruits are abundant, just sometimes a bit complicated for tourists to manage when purchased on the street if they don't have knives or ways to cut and serve them in a non-messy fashion. Don't expect to see many veggies, and when you do, relish them. And of course the mantra for most tourists traveling there is – don't drink the water! There's plenty of bottled water, juices and beer around, so you should not get sick from either gluten or water if you're nominally careful. Remember why you're in Cuba – not for fine dining, but to see the culture, listen to music, and have fun.
  5. Has anyone ever flown with a toaster in your luggage? I have to travel for work in a couple weeks. Staff (me) are being told we have to eat at the meals provided. They have assured me that the hotel will have gluten-free meals for me. I saw the menu for breakfast, and I can't imagine it keeping me full during long meetings. There will be fruit, gluten-free cereal, gluten-free yogurt... I have issues with eggs, so eating breakfast foods while traveling is always a challenge. I was told by my nutritionist not to eat oatmeal. I'm thinking of packing my toaster in my luggage and having toast with peanut butter every day. Has anyone tried traveling with a toaster and gluten-free bread? Other suggestions? Maybe Epic bars with the breakfast offered?
  6. My 13yo son was diagnosed by biopsy in August of this year. We have not had to travel since he has been diagnosed. I am concerned with holiday travel coming up. My husband wants to visit his parents this year for our kids Christmas break but, I'm concerned about my son getting "glutened" while we stay at my in-laws. I already know that they will think I'm being irrational if I insist on bringing a toaster and cookware for my son's meal prep. They won't understand about him not being able to use the communal butter dish or serving utensils. Fortunately, my sister-in-law says that there are gluten-free options at their small grocery store. But, I'm worried about what to do, say and generally how to handle this. I don't want to ruin my family's vacation. I want to show my son that his life doesn't have to stop because he has Celiac. I want him to still be able to travel and visit his friends and family! Any good advice out there as to how to handle this with my in-laws and how best to ensure my son doesn't get glutened without offending anyone?
  7. Where can I go besides Europe? Anyone know of cool WWOOFing farms that support celiacs? specifically in South America or Asia?
  8. Hi, wasn't sure where to really put this. UK website Coeliac Sanctuary do travel cards in 44 languages which are all professionally translated and credit card sized, wristbands for Coeliac and Gluten Intolerance and a gluten free recipe calendar. They are UK based but ship internationally too. At the moment they have a discount code when spending £5 you can get 20% off, code is FEELINGNICE, valid until midnight 25th August. Thought some people might find it useful - Link to shop
  9. Hi all, this is my first time I post here. I have celiac disease and was recently diagnosed with other allergies and that's for eggs and dairy protein (casein). I am so sensitive to gluten that I can not eat gluten free oats or can take products where the gluten has been taken out (for example gluten free beer). Unfortunately I am intollerant to millet and buckwheat which makes it difficult to buy substitutes. I am ok where I live but travelling is very difficult for me as it's hard to take in carbs. I know this is a long shot... but my question is does anyone know of some gluten free formula, like a nutricious porridge (but not oats), that is specially designed for 'us'? Something easy on the go, to mix with water for example. That would be very helpful and improve my life quality. Thanks in advance.
  10. I am going on a 2-day road trip and won't have access to a stove, microwave, or fridge for 5 meals. There is no place I can eat out in the area I am in. I am strictly gluten free and dairy free. What can I bring to eat that will last? Any suggestions. Gluten free bread bothers my stomach so not sure what else would last. Know any healthy gluten-free & DF muffin recipes?
  11. I am going on a 2-day road trip and won't have access to a stove, microwave, or fridge for 5 meals. There is no place I can eat out in the area I am in. I am strictly gluten free and dairy free. What can I bring to eat that will last? Any suggestions. Gluten free bread bothers my stomach so not sure what else would last. Know any healthy gluten-free & DF muffin recipes?
  12. Daniel Moran

    Gluten-Free Airline Travel

    Celiac.com 05/08/2008 - I am here to help you with your needs as you travel, and to be able to keep the "Gluten Monster" away, so you can enjoy your trip. When getting ready to fly you have to expect long delays. As a celiac that means you have to try to find food. If you haven’t traveled by plane before you will be in for a big surprise. The restaurants that are in the airports are always busy. This means that it is like going to a restaurant at peak time, and, in my opinion, that is not the best time for celiacs to eat in restaurants. You might want to try the fast food places that are chains if they are in the airport. The usual method is to try to get the manager to help you. Give the manager a fresh plastic fork to retrieve your meat or chicken so they don’t use gloves that have bread crumbs on them. Ask for catsup or mayo packages so you can read the ingredients. You can ask for them to make a fresh salad if that is what you like. One of the good things about most of the restaurants in airports is that at many of them you will be able to see the cooks prepare your food. Never be afraid to say “I saw you put my food on the table and bread got on it” and ask for a new meal. If there are no chain restaurants at the airport go to one of the restaurants where you can watch your food get made. Some of the restaurants have the cooking grill right in front of you. See if they can cook the food (hamburger, chicken) on the grill. You have to determine if they put the buns on the grill. If they do grill the buns on the same grill where they cook your food there is a good chance that crumbs are there and you should stay away or ask them to clean the grill with the razor blade tool. You have to determine how busy they are and if they are too busy don’t ask for something like that. Sometimes I ask for my food to be covered and microwaved. This is a very safe way to have your food cooked and if it is busy in the kitchen, your food is well protected. You still need to be careful with the salads in these types of restaurants. Remember that these places are usually busy and crumbs fly around everywhere. If they are slow ask if they can open a fresh bag of processed salad for you because you get very ill from the smallest crumb. What Chef Daniel does when Flying When I fly I always have a plan B. I bring a carry on bag with some gluten-free food that is in a clear plastic bag. This is food that if security says throw it away, I do. So far all the times I have traveled by air I haven’t been asked to throw anything away. I bring food that can last all day without spoiling. I bring food that if it gets hot and melts it is still good to eat. I like ham, pepperoni, cheese, vegetables, peanuts and some candy to keep me going. Just remember to tell the security that you have a special diet in case they ask, but don’t offer the info unless they ask. You need to be truthful and most folks are going to understand. Let the security know that you are unable to eat in the local airport restaurants and you have a long day ahead of you. You don’t want to cause any trouble in an airport so be willing to throw it away the second they ask. You could pull out your chef Daniel restaurant paper to show them how serous you take eating and by providing your list it will show them that you are very serious. It is just a way to show security how serious you take your health. Now you should be ok if you got through security and when the flight attendant comes around offering food, especially if you are on a flight for a long time, you have some food that will carry you over. Most airlines will take special requests for meals but you are taking a huge chance on eating that food. The caterers who do these meals for the planes do thousands and thousands of meals. I don’t take the chance of eating such a meal. I get way to sick if there is any contamination. When I call in for a special request for a meal I ask for whole fruit or whole vegetables, anything I know that hasn’t been on a cutting board. I usually ask for carrots or other vegetables or fruit that I like. I am scared of being sick so I will cut or break my food then eat it. Even at restaurants I ask for whole vegetables for me to cut myself. If you read my last article about my salad with croutons coming to me you can see why I am so scared of restaurants. Once you are burned you never forget...but you do learn. If you call ahead to the airport to ask for a special diet request make sure you are thorough with your request and tell them how sick you can get. Ask the airlines if you can send a request per email or snail mail with your directions in how to prepare your meal. I would ask the caterer to tape your request right to your plate so when you board the plane it will be easy to see. As you board notify the stewards you are the special meal request. Be sure to have a plan B. Look at your meal carefully when you get it and determine if it is up to your standards. I believe this article can help you travel gluten-free on board any airline. There are always little stops where you can buy a piece of fruit or packaged products but if you want something more like a hot meal you will need to follow my advice to stay safe. Gluten-Free Air Travel Hints: You should always try to getthe manager to help you. In any restaurant they have the most time tohelp you and they will help you because they typically care more thanthe regular workers (today’s restaurants have employees that come inone day and are gone the next.help. It is sad but that is the way itis so at least try to get the manager. Don’t be ashamed to askfor anything. If you want a hot dog or the chips they put on the sideof the plate ask for a bag with the product inside. Take out your safeand forbidden lists if needed and look at them to see if you can eat aproduct. Always have your Chef Daniel's restaurant paper with you in your walletor purse. Always have a copy of your safe and forbidden lists with youin case you need it to read ingredients. Always have a gluten-free restaurant card in the language you need. Crosscontamination is the greatest risk for a celiac when traveling. Crosscontamination can happen and you would never know it, such as when thechef uses a knife to cut a piece of bread, and then they use the sameknife on your vegetables, or when the chef uses a pair of tongs to flipa breaded chicken and then uses them to flip your sauté chicken.Thereare too many other ways to mention, but the main thing is that glutencould be on the tool before it is used on your meal, and it doesn’tmatter how safe the chef thought he was because you got one crumb andyou are sick for days and that ruins your vacation. Chef Daniel
  13. Liz B

    Travel to Norway

    Has anyone been to Norway and have any tips on what to eat and not to eat? We will have a kitchen for some of the trip, but not all. Thanks! Liz
  14. Hello all, I'm new to this website and figured it would be in my best interest to go ahead and make a small post about myself, mostly because I'm having a lot of trouble trying to adapt to my new lifestyle, and it is irritating me to no end. I lived in South Korea for three years previously, moved home for ~8 months (during which time I was diagnosed with celiac) and have returned to Korea. When I was diagnosed, I was already planning on returning and I was highly positive that I'd be able to handle living in Asia with celiac. Well......... it has been 2 months now and it's much harder than I imagined. However, it is much easier (and way cheaper) to order gluten-free foods online here than I could have imagined, so that's one perk! I am mostly just hoping to receive some positive vibes from you all.... I'm trying my best but it doesn't really seem like my best is good enough. I've got separate sponges for dishes (no dish washer), separate pans for cooking (gluten-free pasta is more expensive than in the states so I don't let my bf eat it..ha), use steel wool if I'm ever in doubt, clean my countertops religiously, take daily (gluten-free) vitamins, check labels like never before, and eat out as little as possible, and yet.. I still manage to make myself sick at least once a week. Usually on the weekend when I try to eat out, but sometimes when I try cooking, as well. That's probably the most irritating thing... putting effort into cooking and then making myself sick. One of my favorite things about Korea is it's food and eating at restaurants with my friends, so it has been realllyyyy tough for me to let go of that part of my life. Luckily my boyfriend has been incredible about my struggles and is always willing to help (he even found me fried chicken with 100% rice flour!), which has been huge for me. Probably would be headed home right now if it weren't for him, quite honestly, which is super depressing to think about because I always thought I was so 'adaptable' and capable of making changes, persevering, etc..and I also really love living abroad and Korea in general!! Anyway.. sorry for the ramble here! I'm so glad there is a community like this. I definitely need it! Especially from across the world. I don't particularly know what kind of replies I'm expecting, if any, but if anyone has had any similar experiences (travel, living abroad, etc) please share!!!!!
  15. Hi there, I am about to do a few months of travel for my work (Stockholm, Leipzig) and am looking into meal replacement (shakes etc.) as an option for my time away. My kind of work involves a lot of eating out etc. and I haven't really got to the point where I am comfortable eating out lots (dx 18 months ago). I mostly cook my own meals at home so I'm used to being in control of the cross contamination etc. While working away cooking for myself won't be very practical. I plan to cook some of my own meals and find a couple of gluten-free restaurants but am wondering if there is any gluten-free meal replacement options out there or something similar. I have been looking into meal replacement such as soylent etc. and wondering if anybody has tried, or knows of, any gluten-free alternatives? I do not mind eating plain and simple as long as it is gluten free and I'm getting all required nutrients etc. Is it even a good idea to be doing meal replacement as a celiac? Thanks in advance.
  16. Celiac.com 11/15/2007 - When I was diagnosed with celiac disease a number of years ago, I had the misfortune of being directed to the local hospital’s dietician for counseling. After she confessed that she, too, was celiac I anticipated some great tips for managing the new dietary regime. To my surprise and disappointment, she gave me less information than I had already learned from the internet between the time of diagnosis and my appointment. Then she sighed, “You’ll see. After a while, food just becomes less important to you.” To someone who has always enjoyed good cooking and good company, that was clearly unacceptable – and it was utter nonsense. I promptly went to the bookstore, bought Rebecca Reilly’s excellent cookbook, “Gluten-free Baking,” and made a delicious gluten-free French apple tart. I put some whipped cream on the side and brought a slice to my internist, leaving it at lunchtime with thanks for a life-improving diagnosis and a suggestion not to send celiacs to that dietician. There have been too many fabulous gluten-free meals in my life since then to count. When I retired in July, I was ready to take on new gluten-free adventures. My husband and I decided on a six week self-guided bicycle trip, variously camping and staying in inexpensive lodgings throughout southernFrance. Of course, I had to figure out how to manage celiac disease in this land of patisserie (pastry) and pain (bread). But I was determined to have a “pain-less” trip. To cut to the chase, we had an incredible time and I ate wonderfully. We had gourmet picnics, restaurant meals, and dinners cooked on our camp stove. I only got sick once. For fellow celiacs contemplating European travel, I’d like to share here what I learned, including specific brands and general suggestions for how to get along. I do have the advantage of reasonable fluency in French, but with a little help you can manage without that. First, I suggest you go to: www.afdiag.org. This is the website of the “Association Francaise des Intolerants au Gluten” (French association of the gluten-intolerant). On this site, there are several particularly useful pages. One has a handy chart of foods that are “interdits” (forbidden) side by side with those that are “autorises” (allowable). I carried a print-out of this page and used it in restaurants, butcher shops, etc. I found it considerably more detailed than something like a “cuisine card” (such as the gluten-free restaurant cards available at Celiac.com). It shows particular types of regional sausages, for example, that are safe for celiacs, and so helped me pick out pates and cured meats after consultation with each charcutier (butcher) that I encountered. Of course, there is no substitute for being able to explain your needs and discuss a menu with the chef, but this page is a great aid. With this page and the help of a bilingual friend, I suggest you study up in advance, as well, on basic terms for wheat, rye, barley, oats, and food starch, as well as words for celiac-friendly grains such as corn (maiz), buckwheat (sarrasin), rice (riz), etc. Also, a restaurant card might be more helpful to someone who doesn't speak French than it would be for me. Another useful afdiag.org page, if you are lucky enough to be invited into any French homes, is titled “Recevoir un Intolerant.” This gives information and advice to anyone who offers to host you. Through a biking network on the web, we had arranged contacts with a few people who gave us meals and a place to stay, and I sent them e-mails in advance politely explaining that I am gluten intolerant, and giving the link to this page. The site also has a list of gluten-free product lines and distributors. Brand names that are exclusively gluten-free or that include some gluten-free products include not only those that are typically imported to theU.S., such as Dr. Schar, but also French and other European brands, including Valpiform, Gluta Bye, France Aglut, Barkat, and many others. By the way, the site also links to an alphabetical list by country of national gluten-intolerance organizations, which is a great resource for any traveler. Grocery Stores My travels were in southernFrance(the Dordogne/Lot/Vezere area, the Luberon,Provence,Carcassonne). We shopped frequently and I combed grocery stores in larger cities, includingAvignonandToulouse, smaller ones, such as Apt, and tiny villages and hill-towns for gluten-free options. In general, groceries, including the big chains such as Hyper Champion, did not seem to carry exclusively gluten-free products, such as baked goods, and I had to watch for hidden gluten in many brands, including yogurts and canned goods that, from myU.S.experience, I might have expected to be gluten-free. This was something to be cautious about in the organic food (“bio” or “biologique”) sections of regular grocery stores, too. Rice cakes were easily available in a pinch, and instant polenta made a quick camping meal after a long day on the bikes. Both were common products even in small stores. Where buckwheat crepes are a regional specialty, you can sometimes find them, pre-packaged, in the refrigerated section of grocery stores. They were delicious filled with fromage blanc and heated on our camp stove, then topped with fresh fruit and/or one of the many fabulous jams that are available everywhere. Of course, you can find many other delicious gluten-free foods to eat at any grocery, particularly in a country that excels in cheeses, olives, fruits, vegetables, chocolate and wines. French stores also often have roasted or vacuum packed pre-cooked beets and potatoes, which make simple additions to a meal if you have no easy way to cook. And there were some serendipitous finds such as a wonderful tinned almond cake, a regional specialty of Provence (made by “L’Amandier de Ventoux” from Biscuiterie de Provence). In the town of St. Remy, the artisanal cookie bakery also made several gluten-free almond-based cookie variations that were exciting. “Bio” Stores But the real treasure troves are found in just about any “magasin bio.” “Bio” or “biologique” is the French term for “organic” and a “bio” is a health food store. When I inquired about products “sans gluten,” I was often told that there is increasing interest in gluten-free foods, and even the smallest “bio” stores had them. We celiacs are benefiting from a trendy idea among health-conscious consumers that gluten is suspect – and hey, let’s enjoy the sudden proliferation of choices! The bigger “bio” stores had very wide selections. There, I found packaged gluten-free muesli, cereals, muffins, small cakes, and cookies of all sorts. Some stores carried cookies from “Aux Biscuits d’Antoine,” a dedicated gluten-free French bakery; I was leery about trying their buckwheat and grapefruit flavored cookies, but they turned out to be tasty, especially with hot tea. In general, the gluten-free cookie brands ranged from numerous types that resemble good non-gluten-free European packaged cookies (filled wafers, “sandies,” etc.) to purist health food-type selections (whole grains and unprocessed sugars). While salty snacks are not as prevalent inFrance as they are in theU.S. (the French think of us as a country of between meal nibblers and over eaters), some choices are available (Barkat brand pretzels are terrific). Some snack bars were gluten-free, including an interesting if crumbly one made from chestnuts (Domino Chataigne from Grillon d’Or). Bread Best of all, just about every “bio” carried several types of bread, all of which were vastly better than the dense, flavorless rice breads that are the default choice in U.S. health food stores. The breads included both “white” breads (including baguettes) and whole grain options. In my pre-diagnosed life, I always preferred European type breads, so I enjoyed sampling these. There are many choices in the Schar line, including “Sunna,” which resemble whole-wheat rolls.GlutaBye,FranceAglut and Valpiform all make different varieties of “pain campagnard” (country-style bread) based on rice flour, buckwheat flour, nut flour and other ingredients. Quinoa or teff flours are sometimes included. All have a nice sour taste, like that of a good light rye, because they are based on a levain (sourdough). I used to be very fond of the dense, German-style, thinly-sliced rectangular whole rye breads, and I was thrilled to find several gluten-free versions of this type of slow baked, long shelf life bread. Pural (“Bio c’est la vie”) makes a levain based “Glutenfrieies Volkornbrot” (German whole grain gluten-free bread/ “pain complet sans gluten”) with whole rice, millet, buckwheat, lupin flour (lupin is a type of bean but, thank heaven, it does not have the bitter beany taste of garbanzo and fava bean flours), and sunflower seeds. A similar bread, also German-made, was the Bio Kerniges Buchweizenbrot (organic buckwheat bread) based on buckwheat sourdough, corn, sunflower seeds, millet, buckwheat, soy, rice, apple fibers and honey. The wide variety of languages on the labels for these products suggests that they are distributed in many European countries. [by the way, friends traveling inNorwaybrought back a box of gluten-free Wasa crackers (Knackebrod) that were phenomenal. I contacted the company but found that this particular product is made by their Swiss subsidiary and they were unaware of anyU.S.distributors.] In two “bio” stores, I found the holy grail of gluten-free breads: freshly baked, with an excellent crumb and chewy European-style crust. These were 100% buckwheat (“pur sarrasin”) breads made by local bakers. The two stores that carried them only got them once a week and had a few loaves, which were quickly snapped up by eager customers. While I was never able to chase down the bakers, from whom I wanted to learn a few tricks of the trade, I was astounded at how good these breads were. They were nothing like the leaden buckwheat loaves that I have eaten (or rejected) in theU.S. I once bought one of these at the Flying Apron in the University district inSeattle, a bakery that has otherwise delightful gluten-free baked goods, and it became a running joke – we used it as a doorstop for a while. I brought home some levain sarrasin (buckwheat sourdough starter) fromFranceand have been experimenting in my kitchen, but have yet to get beyond the brick phase myself. Searching for recipes on the internet, to date, has not helped. Anyway, these breads are treasures to seek out. I was, however, happy to find a German-style whole-grain gluten-free bread when I returned to the U.S. Made by “Bavarian” (which also carries a number of similar but non-gluten-free products, so be careful) this gluten-free bread has a several month shelf life and contains whole rice, whole corn, millet, and sweet lupin flour. It has a very good taste and holds together well. If readers have other sources for gluten-free European breads in this country, please do share them. And happy travels!
  17. In Saint Denis , the capital, New shop L ile ô bio , rue Michel Ah Sam tel 0262946564sells gluten free biscuits brand Nature & Co quite nice, pasta Italian shop Mediterraneo 38bis rue Charles Gounod 0262134702 sells nice pasta and sauces Frozen shop Picard sells a Genius bread , not bad local food, beware of the gratin de chouchou , very nice but the bechamel sauce got flour easy to find salad and grilled fish, lots of rice base dishes
  18. Leaf Ericson

    Bandon Dunes Golf Resort

    Hello all. I am currently planning a golf trip to Bandon Dunes. For any golfers out there you know this is a Bucket List trip that all golfers dream about. I have checked their website and noticed that they do accommodate specialty diets, including gluten free. However, I have not been able to find any feedback from someone with Celiac or someone that has first hand experience with eating gluten free there. If anybody has and can share their experience it would be much appreciated. The last thing I want to do when I'm there is worry about the food or not feel well. Thanks.
  19. Hey guys! I’m a graphic design junior, and we are in the first semester of our capstone. My mom was diagnosed with celiac, so I’m really passionate about helping make the post diagnosis life a little easier. I’m not sure what specific problem within celiac disease to tackle. I have found it helpful to talk to those with celiac about what they find most frustrating or challenging. If anyone has any suggestions on what is most frustrating or what you wished you had to help, it would be much much appreciated!
  20. New to the forums - and a total shot in the dark here.. but any guidance for the dining options on NORTH Captiva Island? This is the very remote, isolated island north of Sanibel/Captiva proper. Accessible only by ferry and and car-free island. There are very few dining options (https://www.tripadvisor.com/Restaurants-g6537588-North_Captiva_Island_Florida.html) and while we plan to shop/pack in 90% of our groceries for our rental, it would be nice to be able to not have to cook a night or two All of the restaraunts seem like total gluten shacks and cc horrors.. so hoping someone has first hand experience and might be able to say "xxx will make you xxx upon request" or "I dined at xxxx with some substitutions without any problems". We are fully prepared to try and wing it - - or go completely without if need be though. TIA!
  21. Hello, I am visiting Krakow, Prague and Munich in a couple weeks... I do not have celiac or gluten sensitivity, but I am sensitive to barley and rye. So in the US, when eating out I typically have to stick to a 'gluten-free' diet because pretty much all flour used is all-purpose/enriched and contains barley. But if something is only made with wheat flour, I CAN eat it. Is anyone familiar with the cooking/baking customs in these cities and whether typical flour contains barley as in the US? In addition to the barley & rye sensitivity, I'm also sensitive to xanthan gum... a common additive in gluten-free baked goods. SO in the US I can't even eat 'gluten-free' baked goods unless I can read the label or I've made them myself. Does anyone know whether xanthan gum is commonly used in Europe? The only real info I'm finding online is it has been approved by the EU. Any insight/advice would be appreciated! Thank you, Stacey
  22. glutenfreebrandi

    Gluten free in Memphis, TN?

    Hi! I will be traveling to Memphis, TN and staying at a friend's home for a week. I'm sure they will want to go out to eat some nights, can you guys name any good gluten free restaurants? (BBQ would be amazing! (: )
  23. Celiac.com 05/22/2014 - In September 2013, I found out that if I want to be healthy, I have to eat a strict gluten-free diet. Not only that, but I also have to avoid corn, casein, beef, chicken, shrimp, garlic, yeast, grapes, cantaloupe, and cauliflower. When I go to a restaurant, my diet restrictions eliminate almost everything on the menu. Because of the lack of options and my fear of cross-contamination, I have not been to any restaurant since my diagnosis except for dedicated gluten-free restaurants. But eating at home every day for the rest of my life cannot be the answer. I will not let gluten rule my life and turn me into a hermit. Traveling is one of my biggest passions and if food is my only obstacle to living my passion, I will face my fear of cross-contamination, find solutions, and overcome this obstacle one bite at a time. Of course, my first gluten-free vacation won’t be a trekking trip across the Himalayas although this is still on my bucket list. No, for my first gluten-free vacation I have chosen a less challenging trip. I have decided to go on a seven-day Mediterranean cruise on board the Aida Sol. Aida assures, on their website, that allergy sufferers can find and enjoy a variety of delicious allergen-free (especially gluten-free and lactose-free) food aboard their cruise ships. Additionally, you can meet with the head chef for 30 minutes to discuss your diet options for the week, and there is always a chef available for questions. It all sounds so promising, but is it really as wonderful as Aida claims? Is the food aboard the Aida Sol really safe for someone with celiac disease? I’m ready to find out. Day 1 It is late in the afternoon and we are finally at the check-in desk. I am getting hungrier and more nervous by the minute. When I ask the receptionist how I can schedule my private session with the chef, he tells me to just go to one of the buffets and ask for one of the chefs. That should be easy, but I’m still nervous. This is the first time since my diagnosis that I will be eating at a regular restaurant. What if I get sick tonight? What would I eat for the rest of my trip? When we arrive at the Bella Donna Restaurant, one of the buffets on the Aida Sol, a welcoming chef gives me a tour of the buffet. He doesn’t take the time to sit down with me, but he shows me around; he points out the labels right above every dish which say whether the food is gluten-free, lactose-free, and/or vegetarian. What a relief! I immediately see several dishes that I believe I can eat. After a quick tour of the buffet, I take a plate and start grabbing more and more … meat. Yes, most of the gluten-free and lactose-free options are meat and my plate is packed with it except for a few veggies on the side. Ironically, I have never been a big meat eater until now. In fact, before I went gluten-free, I was a pescetarian. The only reason I decided to eat meat again was because I was eating as much as I could but kept losing weight. By the time of my diagnosis I was no more than 106 lb. I’m feeling wonderful. I’m at a regular restaurant and I’m enjoying my food like everybody else. Not only can I eat as much as I want, but I also have multiple choices … until we get to the dessert. I’m walking from one dessert to the next. None of the labels says gluten-free. I’m slightly disappointed. But let’s try the fruit bar! And what an amazing fruit bar it is! Besides apples and oranges, I see mangoes, kiwis, papayas, pineapples, purple & green passion fruits, persimmons, dragon fruits, cape gooseberries, and coconuts. I don’t think I’ll go hungry this week. What a relief! Day 2 First day at sea, I made it through the first night without getting sick! I’m incredibly happy. The sun is shining through the window. The balcony door is open. I can hear the waves. What a perfect morning! Until I get up. Wow! The motion of the sea is stronger than I expected. I was feeling great, but now I’m not. I feel sick. Seasick. No breakfast for me. Day 3 We’ve reached Tunisia, but before I explore the cities Tunis and Sidi Bou Said, I need to eat as much breakfast as I can since I’m not sure if I’ll be back in time for lunch and I’m too scared to try a Tunisian restaurant. This is my first breakfast on board. I’m walking around the buffet, trying to find something gluten and casein-free, but none of the dishes have labels. I’m feeling a little lost. I’ve already gotten used to those labels so much so that without them I immediately expect the food to be unsafe. I’m staring at the food, but I’m afraid to touch it. Where is the chef? When I ask the chef about what’s gluten-free, he doesn’t seem as well prepared as the first night. Maybe it is because of the lack of labels. When I ask him about the deli meat, he tells me that it is not prepared on board the ship, so he can’t tell me whether it is gluten-free or not. Why not? Why does the chef of a large cruise ship, which claims to be prepared for guests with celiac disease or gluten intolerance, not know whether the food he’s offering is gluten free? That’s not what Aida advertises on their website. I begin to realize that the staff, including the chefs, is not as well educated when it comes to celiac disease and gluten as I had hoped, which becomes even more obvious when the chef suggests that I could probably eat the ham. I’m standing in front of the deli counter, staring at the ham and then the meat-cutting machine. Wait a minute! That meat-cutting machine, is it used for all the deli meats? I begin to hear the word “cross-contamination” ringing in my ear; it’s slowly taking over my mind. I feel a bit of fear rising in my body. My trust in the chefs and kitchen staff begins to crumble. I will need to be more careful from now on and watch out for cross-contamination. Day 4 We are in La Valette, Malta. The weather has been a mix of rain and sunshine, but the city is so beautiful that no rain can cloud its beauty. I’m running around the city, trying to see as much of it as possible before I rush back to the ship to grab some lunch before the buffet closes. The restaurant I usually choose is already closed and I have to try the Markt Restaurant. Usually both of these buffets offer lots of gluten-free options, but not this time. Twice, I walk from dish to dish, trying to find something I can eat. It’s not that there aren’t any gluten-free options, but the number is so small that my other food intolerances make it impossible for me to find any food. I end up eating some fruits and a salad that has garlic in it which makes my stomach hurt. This is the first time I leave the restaurant hungry, and I’m hoping that it will be the last. Day 5 We spent the day in Palermo, Sicily, and are now ready for dinner. As usual, the dinner food is delicious. Every night my plate is packed with meat, vegetables, and fruits. So far, I can say that I haven’t been glutened, but I’ve been noticing other places of cross-contamination. Tonight, for example, you can get gluten-free pasta sauce but not gluten-free pasta. In fact, the gluten-free pasta sauce is right next to the wheat pasta. Not just that, but a few of the wheat noodles have already fallen into the pasta sauce. I will certainly not eat the sauce. Day 6 My breakfast is the same as it was yesterday, and the day before, and the day before that: bacon and eggs. Every single day I’ve been eating bacon and eggs for breakfast. Lots of bacon and eggs! At least half of my plate is packed with bacon while the other half is packed with eggs. I can feel people’s eyes on the back of my neck wondering why I’m eating so much bacon and eggs. Well, it’s pretty much the only thing I can eat for breakfast. I’m slowly getting tired of all the meat, and I wish I had other options, but my body feels fine. I am still watching out for cross-contaminated food. Tonight, for instance, I’m avoiding the cut fruits from the fruit bar because the kitchen staff that is cutting the fruits is also preparing the Kaiserschmarrn (a cut-up sugared pancake with raisins) in the same work area. Even though the staff members are wearing gloves, they haven’t been changing them before handling the fruits. It becomes more and more obvious that the kitchen staff is not well informed when it comes to gluten and cross-contamination. Day 7 Last destination: Barcelona. I have heard of the city’s numerous gluten-free dining options, but while I’m exploring the city, it feels like I’m only seeing bakeries filled with pastries made out of wheat. This entire cruise I didn’t eat any pasta, bread, cookies, or chocolate, and I’m craving it, oh, I’m craving it! Even though I don’t eat much of it anymore, it feels like I’m actually addicted to it. I’m not sure whether it’s the flour or the sugar, but it’s getting harder and harder to bear those cookies and cakes behind the shop windows. I’m trying to distract myself from what I’m seeing, which works until I walk into my room. When I open the door, I see a plate with a big piece of cake lying on my bed. Is this a joke? If it is, it’s not a good one. Where does this cake come from? My father is smiling at me. He tells me that he was in the restaurant for coffee and cake and heard someone request a piece of gluten-free cake from the kitchen, so he ordered one for me. I can’t believe it! They had gluten-free cake the entire week and I didn’t know! The chef never mentioned it. I decide to eat the cake as a special dessert after dinner. Day 8 Last night was a nightmare. I had cramps that kept me awake the whole night, and I had numbness in my fingers. Until today I was convinced that the numbness in my fingers was caused by gluten, but the cake was gluten-free, so was there maybe corn in it? I’m confused. In the afternoon, I decide to go see one of the kitchen chefs to ask him about the ingredients in the gluten-free cake. I want to know whether there was corn in it or not. The chef is very accommodating and immediately goes into the kitchen to check the ingredients on the box. When he comes back, he tells me that there is no corn in the cake but that there is a little bit of wheat in it. What? There’s wheat in the gluten-free cake. How can that be? How can it be gluten-free when there is a little bit of wheat in it? He tells me that it says gluten-free on the box. He believes that it must be just traces of wheat. Right! Traces of wheat! That’s enough to make me sick. So, the numbness in my fingers last night was actually caused by gluten. Departure After my talk with the chef, it’s time for our departure. It was a great vacation, but I’m ready to get back home, especially since my trust in the kitchen chefs has been damaged too much by this last incident. Overall, Aida Sol did not deliver as well as promised on their gluten-free commitment. Yes, Aida offers various delicious gluten-free dishes on board their ships so that no one needs to go hungry; however, because of the chefs’ and staff members’ insufficient knowledge of celiac disease and of the risks of cross-contamination, I can’t declare the gluten-free food options on board Aida Sol to be safe. My advice to gluten-free travelers is to remain careful even when it says gluten-free. Always ask for the ingredients, especially of those foods that are not prepared on board the ship. Despite their ignorance of cross-contamination, I value Aida for trying to be accommodating to allergy sufferers. There are not many hotels and restaurants that are as accommodating as Aida, but I would appreciate even more if Aida had better informed staff that is more aware of the risks of cross-contamination. It’s of no use to allergy sufferers if the great gluten-free food that is offered on board the ships gets contaminated because of ignorant kitchen staff. Furthermore, there should be at least one chef in each restaurant that is familiar with the ingredients of the foods that are not prepared on board the ship. I only got sick once at the end of my time on the Aida Sol, but I am not sure if it was pure luck that it happened not more than once.
  24. Celiac.com 08/31/2015 - It is possible that Oregon could be one of the gluten-free friendliest places on Earth. I had never been there before, but after a road trip to Oregon this summer I will definitely be back. One interesting thing that I already knew about Oregon before my trip was that, for some reason, it is a hotbed for the test marketing of new gluten-free products. Many large corporations roll them out there first, before launching them in other states. These companies also pump a lot of marketing money into Oregon to promote these products—on a level that I've not seen in other states. Here is a picture that I took in downtown Portland of a huge billboard for Coors Peak Copper Lager. Not only can I not find this new gluten-free beer anywhere in the California Bay Area, but I also have never seen advertising done here on this scale for any gluten-free product. Perhaps due to Oregon's history of being very progressive when it comes to food and beverage trends—for example the microbrewery and organic food movements took hold there very early on—it seems that the gluten-free food movement has also progressed there faster and is far more mature than many other places that I've been. This was very apparent to me when I first crossed the border and stopped at a Subway and found that they offered a gluten-free sub roll option, and the staff was well-trained in how to prepare my sandwich in a way that would minimize any cross-contamination risks. Besides large corporate chain restaurants which offered unexpected gluten-free options, every local or family owned restaurant that I ate in also offered gluten-free options and/or a gluten-free menu. In fact, there is even a huge food truck culture in downtown Portland that is centered in parking lots near the China Town area, and many of these trucks advertise that they are either entirely gluten-free or have gluten-free options. So you may be wondering where I came up with “ Gluten is the New Al Qaeda” in the title of this article? While in Portland I visited their huge “Portland Saturday Market,” which covers most of the waterfront in the downtown area on Saturdays and Sundays from March through Christmas. In one of the booths I found a vendor who was selling t-shirts and tote bags with this phrase on it, and since I happened to need a tote bag I picked one up. Looking back on this trip now I believe that this vendor's idea pretty much summed up my gluten-free experiences in Oregon—where those who are gluten-free will find many like minded people and therefore wont' have to waist much time explaining themselves when they order food—and a place where gluten is now being avoided by many Oregonians like most people in the world hope to avoid Al Qaeda!
  25. Can anyone recommend a total meal replacement option? Preferably a powder or something that only requires water, yet still offers full nutrition for heavy activity. Or a good resource to making my own? Must be light, compact, and not spoil in dry heat. I know that clearly this isn't the best way to go health wise, but I'm coming up on a month of work where I will be away from stores and need to find a way to eat without relying on anyone. I need to travel relatively light, and won't have prep time, cooking access, or refrigerated storage. Initially I was planning on using Soylent, but since I first checked out their product, they have announced - cross contamination. Any leads or suggestions? Or anyone else have experience with giving up on solids for an extended period of time? I'll be physically active, and moving heavy objects. Hopefully one of us has experience, or even a zombie apocalypse scenario saved somewhere