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Found 64 results

  1. Celiac.com 06/20/2018 - Currently, the only way to manage celiac disease is to eliminate gluten from the diet. That could be set to change as clinical trials begin in Australia for a new vaccine that aims to switch off the immune response to gluten. The trials are set to begin at Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast Clinical Trials Centre. The vaccine is designed to allow people with celiac disease to consume gluten with no adverse effects. A successful vaccine could be the beginning of the end for the gluten-free diet as the only currently viable treatment for celiac disease. That could be a massive breakthrough for people with celiac disease. USC’s Clinical Trials Centre Director Lucas Litewka said trial participants would receive an injection of the vaccine twice a week for seven weeks. The trials will be conducted alongside gastroenterologist Dr. James Daveson, who called the vaccine “a very exciting potential new therapy that has been undergoing clinical trials for several years now.” Dr. Daveson said the investigational vaccine might potentially restore gluten tolerance to people with celiac disease.The trial is open to adults between the ages of 18 and 70 who have clinically diagnosed celiac disease, and have followed a strict gluten-free diet for at least 12 months. Anyone interested in participating can go to www.joinourtrials.com. Read more at the website for Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast Clinical Trials Centre. Source: FoodProcessing.com.au
  2. Celiac.com 06/19/2018 - Could baking soda help reduce the inflammation and damage caused by autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, and celiac disease? Scientists at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University say that a daily dose of baking soda may in fact help reduce inflammation and damage caused by autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, and celiac disease. Those scientists recently gathered some of the first evidence to show that cheap, over-the-counter antacids can prompt the spleen to promote an anti-inflammatory environment that could be helpful in combating inflammatory disease. A type of cell called mesothelial cells line our body cavities, like the digestive tract. They have little fingers, called microvilli, that sense the environment, and warn the organs they cover that there is an invader and an immune response is needed. The team’s data shows that when rats or healthy people drink a solution of baking soda, the stomach makes more acid, which causes mesothelial cells on the outside of the spleen to tell the spleen to go easy on the immune response. "It's most likely a hamburger not a bacterial infection," is basically the message, says Dr. Paul O'Connor, renal physiologist in the MCG Department of Physiology at Augusta University and the study's corresponding author. That message, which is transmitted with help from a chemical messenger called acetylcholine, seems to encourage the gut to shift against inflammation, say the scientists. In patients who drank water with baking soda for two weeks, immune cells called macrophages, shifted from primarily those that promote inflammation, called M1, to those that reduce it, called M2. "The shift from inflammatory to an anti-inflammatory profile is happening everywhere," O'Connor says. "We saw it in the kidneys, we saw it in the spleen, now we see it in the peripheral blood." O'Connor hopes drinking baking soda can one day produce similar results for people with autoimmune disease. "You are not really turning anything off or on, you are just pushing it toward one side by giving an anti-inflammatory stimulus," he says, in this case, away from harmful inflammation. "It's potentially a really safe way to treat inflammatory disease." The research was funded by the National Institutes of Health. Read more at: Sciencedaily.com
  3. Celiac.com 02/05/2018 - TIMP-GLIA, a new nanoparticle-based celiac disease treatment currently under development by Cour Pharmaceuticals, has received Fast Track Designation from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Phase 1 studies to assess the safety and tolerability of TIMP-GLIA are currently underway in the United States. TIMP-GLIA works in part by encapsulating a component of wheat within a nanoparticle. The treatment has resulted in gluten tolerance in numerous animal models. By encasing components of gluten proteins in a nanoparticle, Cour is hoping that the gluten will remain unrecognized by the body's immune system, at least until immune tolerance can be generated through non-inflammatory antigen presentation. The FDA created the fast track process to speed development, review and commercialization of drugs that target serious conditions and fill an unmet medical need. Fast Track Designation puts Cour in a "prime position to advance an innovative new approach for the treatment of Celiac Disease," said John J. Puisis, CEO of Cour Pharmaceuticals. Cour is investigating TIMP-GLIA as part of an effort to reprogram the body's immune system so patients develop a tolerance to gluten as a non-threatening substance and ultimately to reduce or reverse celiac disease without the need for immune suppressing drugs. Cour's approach is designed to work by encasing a component of wheat in a nanoparticle, and introducing that particle into a celiac disease patient. If it works as designed, the gluten will remain unrecognized by the body's immune system until tolerance can be achieved through non-inflammatory antigen presentation. The phase 1 clinical trial for TIMP-GLIA study is being conducted at centers in the United States. The objective of the study is to assess the safety and tolerability of TIMP-GLIA when administered intravenously (IV) as a single dose at ascending dose levels and as a repeat dose in subjects with celiac disease. All in all, this is another of many bold and encouraging efforts to treat or cure celiac disease that have arisen in the last few years. Look for news of success or failure over then next few years. Source: Pharmabiz.com
  4. Celiac.com 12/25/2017 - In the very near future, your personal microbiome may be the key to creating a customized treatment for celiac disease. That's because new advances in genome studies are promising to help create a customized, individual approach for treating numerous disorders, including celiac disease. Such individualized treatments may also help to reduce adverse events, and decrease health care costs. So far, a similar approach for optimizing preventive and therapeutic approaches in cancer using human genome sequencing has proven successful. Writing in the Mayo Clinic Proceedings, ad team of researches expounded on this approach. The research team included Purna C. Kashyap, Nicholas Chia, PhD, Heidi Nelson, MD, Eran Segal, PhD, and Eran Elinav, MD, PhD. They are variously affiliated with the Enteric Neuroscience Program, Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN; the Department of Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN; the Department of Computer Science at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot, Israel and with the Department of Immunology, at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot, Israel. Your personal microbiome is the sum total of all the microbes that reside within and upon you, along with all their genetic elements. Using genome sequencing allows doctors to design highly personal, highly focused treatments and therapeutic strategies. In their review for the Mayo Clinic Proceedings, the team highlights the importance of the microbiome in all aspects of human disease, including pathogenesis, phenotype, prognosis, and treatment response. The microbiome also plays a crucial role as a diagnostic and therapeutic biomarker. The team's report describes the role to be played by next-generation sequencing in helping to provide precision microbial identification of infectious diseases, and helping to elucidate the nature and function of microbial communities. Basically, as we further unlock the human genome, we can begin to better understand the role played by the myriad microbes that make up the human microbiome. As we unlock the role of various parts of the microbiome, look for major advances and refinements to diagnosing, treating, and even conquering conditions like celiac disease, and many others. And, with advances coming at breakneck speed, look for this to happen sooner, rather than later. Source: PlumX Metrics - mayoclinicproceedings.org
  5. Will a new treatment enable people with celiac disease to ditch a gluten-free diet? About one in a hundred people in the United States is affected by celiac disease. If you're one of them, you know how hard it can be to maintain a strict gluten-free diet. Everyone's got their horror stories about trying to simply eat a meal, only to have a tiny amount of gluten wreck havoc on their digestive system. There are currently no therapeutics on the market to treat celiac disease, says Sydney Gordon, a scientist at Ab Initio Biotherapeutics. Sure, there are other over-the-counter enzyme treatments, Gordon adds, but most are slow to act, or don't break down enough gluten to prevent a reaction. "There are no other enzymes on the market for celiac disease," said Justin Siegel, the co-founder of PvP Biologics and an assistant professor of chemistry, biochemistry and molecular medicine at UC Davis. "There is nothing that is approved by the FDA for celiac disease. Nothing has made it through clinical trials. There are pills on the market that cause degradation of gluten, but there is no clinical evidence that they are effective." "We wanted to design an enzyme […] a protein that would act as a therapeutic for celiac disease. We came up with a design using a protein modeling tool called FoldIt," said Ingrid Pultz, a co-founder of PvP Biologics. PvP Biologics enzyme therapy works by targeting the exact triggering molecule, the immunogenic epitope, before it gets to the intestine and causes an immune reaction. To do this, PvP Biologics uses kumamolisin, a naturally occurring enzyme that, unlike some other enzymes, can survive the acidity of the stomach. By modifying the amino acid sequence in the original kumamolisin enzyme, researchers were able to specifically target the epitope causing the reaction. If the therapy proves successful, many celiac patients won't have to worry about minute amounts of cross-contamination when eating outside. Those are pretty strong claims. Many people with celiac disease might likely say that it sounds too good to be true. Still, the company is moving in a direction that few others have gone. No word on if or when we might expect to see a finished treatment come to market. For all the company's claims, there is much to work out, and a long, winding road to get FDA approval. Stay tuned to see if the evidence from trials and from potential consumer use supports those claims. Read more at TheAggie.org. Editor's note: We've received a correction on this story from PvP Biologics, makers of KumaMax, which states that their product is designed for accidental gluten ingestion, and not as a replacement for a gluten-free diet in people with celiac disease. Their enzyme could lessen the effects of accidental consumption of small amounts of gluten.
  6. Celiac.com 11/27/2017 - For centuries, physicians have used cannabis to treat numerous disorders. Modern research shows that various cannabis compounds can alleviate symptoms from numerous conditions, including neurological disorders, cancer, rheumatism, epilepsy, sexual disorders, pain, among others. Many people with celiac disease suffer from neuropathy, which causes nerve pain, among other symptoms. Neuropathy can be difficult to treat. Nerve pain is a debilitating symptom that can significantly impair a patient's quality of life. Could a new cannabis patch change that? Some researchers think so. One California-based company, Cannabis Science, is developing an innovative new medicinal patch specifically designed to treat nerve pain. In addition to celiac related neuropathy, the patch could be helpful in treating nerve pain from many illnesses including fibromyalgia, diabetes, and multiple sclerosis. The National Institute of Health estimates that over 5 million Americans suffer from fibromyalgia, which has no known cure, and is difficult to treat. With diabetes on the rise in the U.S., diabetic nerve pain is also on the rise. When placed on the patient's skin, the patch developed by Cannabis Science delivers a measured dose of high potency cannabidiol (CBD) extract. CBD is the second major cannabinoid in marijuana after THC, but CBD has no psychoactive effects, so it won't get people high. When the patch is applied, the CBD is first absorbed into the blood, then moves to the central nervous system, where it delivers pain relief. Numerous studies have documented CBD's “anti-inflammatory and pain-relieving properties. More recent studies have shown that CBD provides relief from many kinds of pain. In addition to nerve pain, CBD has been shown to relieve inflammatory pain. Some studies have shown CBD to be more effective than current medication in treating inflammatory pain, such as pain from arthritis. As researchers home in on the pain-relieving properties of cannabis, look for more treatments to be developed, including treatments that may helpful for peopl with celiac disease. Read more: cannatech.news
  7. Celiac.com 09/19/2017 - Hookworms. Intestinal parasites. They sound gross. The thought of having one's gut infected with a parasitic worm generally makes people's skin crawl. Indeed, intestinal worms, like hookworm, have a bad reputation among health experts, and have been the subject of fierce public health campaigns seeking their eradication. However, researchers have also documented the gut healing abilities of parasites like hookworm. In fact, part of how hookworms seem to work in nature is to promote an optimal gut environment in which they can thrive. In nature, the guts of people infected with hookworm are generally healthy. Could hookworms and other intestinal parasites prove key to treating and possibly eliminating diseases like celiac, and asthma? A number of clinicians and researchers feel that if they can just get the right strain of hookworm, at the right levels, they can basically eradicate celiac disease, and possibly asthma and other inflammatory diseases. When hookworms are introduced into the gut of people with celiac disease in the right amount, and kept at therapeutic levels, patients see their celiac symptoms disappear and their guts return to a healthy, normal condition. In fact, hookworms do not reproduce once inside the human gut, so if doctors put , say, 10 hookworms into a gut to treat celiac disease, there will be 10 there later, not more. In nature, the way humans build up dangerous levels of hookworm is via unsanitary environmental conditions and repeated exposure to more hookworms. Done clinically, the hookworm would present little or no danger to the human who was hosting it. While still very much in the experimental phase, researchers hope to investigate a number of strains to determine the best therapeutic levels for such disease treatments. For that, they will need FDA approval. Remember, the fecal transplant was first described in the 1950s, but took decades to catch on as a conventional treatment for gut disorders, such as c-dif bacteria, partly because it was seen as crude and somehow objectionable. But it proved to work. Really well. So much so that it's now a fairly conventional treatment. Could the hookworm follow a similar path from crude and weird to cool and effective? Could hookworms be used to cure celiac disease? Only close study will tell us for sure, and that's why the move to get FDA approval is an important one. For that, special strains of hookworm must be approved. "One of the big roadblocks is having the parasites that the FDA will allow you to infect people with," says John Hawdon, vice president of the American Society of Parasitologists and a researcher at the George Washington University. He and his colleagues are applying for permission to grow hookworm larvae to standards fit for testing in humans, which is not currently permitted in the United States. Hawdon says he anticipates a lengthy application process. Stay tuned for news on efforts to develop hookworm as a potential cure to celiac disease, asthma, and more. Sources: popsci.com iflscience.com
  8. Celiac.com 08/30/2017 - The human gut is home to a huge and diverse number of microorganisms that perform various biological roles. Disturbances in a healthy gut microbiome might help to trigger various inflammatory diseases, such as multiple sclerosis (MS). Human gut-derived commensal bacteria suppress CNS inflammatory and demyelinating disease. Can they improve the treatment of multiple Sclerosis (MS)? A team of researchers recently set out to evaluate evidence that gut commensals may be used to regulate a systemic immune response and may, therefore, have a possible role in treatment strategies for multiple Sclerosis. The research team included Ashutosh Mangalam, Shailesh K. Shahi, David Luckey, Melissa Karau, Eric Marietta, Ningling Luo, Rok Seon Choung, Josephine Ju, Ramakrishna Sompallae, Katherine Gibson-Corley, Robin Patel, Moses Rodriguez, Chella David, Veena Taneja, and Joseph Murray. In a recent article, the team reports on their identification of human gut-derived commensal bacteria, Prevotella histicola, which can suppress experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in a human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II transgenic mouse model. P. histicola suppresses disease through the modulation of systemic immune reactions. P. histicola challenge caused a reduction in pro-inflammatory Th1 and Th17 cells and an increase in CD4+FoxP3+ regulatory T cells, tolerogenic dendritic cells, and suppressive macrophages. This study indicates that gut commensals may regulate a systemic immune response, and so may have a role in future treatments for multiple Sclerosis, and possibly other autoimmune diseases such as celiac disease. Source: Cell.com. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.celrep.2017.07.031
  9. Celiac.com 06/14/2017 - Some data have suggested a connection between celiac disease and eosinophilic oesophagitis (EoE)/oesophageal eosinophilia (EE). Any potential relationship has implications for treatment. Should the two conditions be treated together, or separately? To better understand any possible connection, and the implications for treatment, a team of researchers recently set out to characterize children with celiac disease+EE in-depth and assess the contribution of each condition to the clinical presentation and treatment response. The research team included Anne Ari, Sara Morgenstern, Gabriel Chodick, Manar Matar, Ari Silbermintz, Amit Assa, Yael Mozer-Glassberg, Firas Rinawi, Vered Nachmias-Friedler, Raanan Shamir, and Noam Zevit. They are variously affiliated with the Institute of Gastroenterology, Nutrition and Liver Diseases, Schneider Children’s Medical Center of Israel, Petach Tikvah, Israel, the Pediatrics Center at Schneider Children’s Medical Center of Israel, Petach Tikvah, Israel, the department of Pathology at Rabin Medical Center in Petach Tikvah, Israel, and the Sackler Faculty of Medicine at Tel Aviv University in Tel Aviv, Israel. The research team conducted a retrospective review of medical records of children with both celiac disease+EE, or isolated EoE diagnosed between 2000 and 2014. They then compared these records with those of patients with isolated celiac disease or epigastric pain. To calculate the frequency of EE, they used endoscopy results of patients with suspected celiac disease or epigastric pain between 2011 and 2014. They used a telephone questionnaire to gather missing data. At a single large, tertiary pediatric center, the team assessed 17 patients with celiac disease+EE, 46 with EoE, 302 with isolated celiac disease, and 247 with epigastric pain. The patients with celiac disease+EE shared characteristics of both individual conditions. While age at diagnosis, family history of autoimmunity/celiac disease and anaemia were similar to most celiac patients, other characteristics such as male gender, personal/family history of atopy, peripheral eosinophilia and oesophageal white papules more closely resembled those of patients with EoE. Most patients with celiac disease+EE tended to present with celiac-associated symptoms, and 63% went on to develop typical EoE symptoms. In celiac disease+EE patients, only 21% saw their EE resolve after a gluten-free diet; another 21% saw their EE normalize after proton pump inhibitor treatment. The rest required EoE-specific treatment. Patients with celiac disease found to have EE share characteristics similar to both isolated celiac disease and EoE. This study indicates that celiac patients with concurrent EE are actually suffering from two separate conditions, rather than celiac-associated eosinophilia. Therefore, in such patients, doctors should consider treating each condition separately. Source: Archives of Disease in Childhood Published Online First: 12 April 2017. doi: 10.1136/archdischild-2016-311944
  10. My husband was diagnosed with celiac the beginning of this week . His doctor said to go gluten-free and he will be fine well the more research I have done the more I have found that is not the case that he has to heal his gut first before actually getting any better. What do we do ? Does he need probiotics does he need more vitamins than he's already taking ? Maybe nutrients ? I don't completely understand is there a book I should buy any classes to go to or other website ?? Thank you
  11. Celiac.com 03/06/2017 - Dermatitis herpetiformis is an autoimmune skin-blistering disease which is commonly associated with celiac disease. The most common treatments are a gluten-free diet along with the addition of dapsone. DH that does not respond to either a gluten-free diet, or to dapsone, is treated with other immune-suppressing medications, but results have been mixed. Now, for the first time, a patient treated with rituximab therapy had resolution of both his pruritus and skin rash. "In addition, the levels of both anti-tissue and anti-epidermal transglutaminase antibodies normalized," said Dr. Ron Feldman of Emory University School of Medicine. Writing in JAMA Dermatology, Dr. Feldman and colleagues describe a man in his 80's with a five-year history of worsening DH. He was put on a gluten-free diet along with dapsone 50 mg daily, but his pruritic rash persisted. Dapsone was discontinued because of worsening anemia. He began treatment with 3 g sulfasalazine daily, but this was discontinued due to gastrointestinal symptoms. His disease worsened, and he was put on a tapering course of prednisone from 40 mg to 10 mg daily along with azathioprine titrated up to 2.5 mg/kg daily. However, his disease continued to worsen over subsequent months. He was then treated with rituximab according to the protocol used to treat lymphoma: four weekly infusions of 375 mg/m2. "Rituximab," says Dr. Feldman, "has already shown efficacy in the treatment of other autoimmune blistering diseases such as pemphigus and pemphigoid and may have relevance with other B cell mediated diseases in dermatology." Thirteen months after treatment, the patient experienced complete resolution of pruritus and other symptoms of DH, as well as normalization of antibodies against both epidermal and tissue transglutaminases. Not only was there a normalization of antibodies against both epidermal and tissue transglutaminases, the patient went into remission and has remained symptom-free for up to a year and a half thus far, said Dr. Feldman. There is some cause for excitement here, since rituximab is well tolerated and can potentially provide long lasting remission with removal of pathogenic autoimmune B cells. Dr. Feldman concedes that their patient did not have serious gastrointestinal symptoms, but remains "hopeful that rituximab may provide similar benefits for patients with celiac disease, in which anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies play a role, although further research will need to be done to confirm this." Source: JAMA Dermatology, online December 28, 2016
  12. Scand J Gastroenterol 1999 Feb;34(2):163-9 Kaukinen K, Collin P, Holm K, Rantala I, Vuolteenaho N, Reunala T, Maki M Dept. of Medicine, Tampere University Hospital, Finland. BACKGROUND: We investigated whether wheat starch-based gluten-free products are safe in the treatment of gluten intolerance. METHODS: The study involved 41 children and adults with coeliac disease and 11 adults with dermatitis herpetiformis adhering to a gluten-free diet for 8 years on average. Thirty-five newly diagnosed coeliac patients at diagnosis and 6 to 24 months after the start of a gluten-free diet and 27 non-coeliac patients with dyspepsia were investigated for comparison. Daily dietary gluten and wheat starch intake were calculated. Small bowel mucosal villous architecture, CD3+, alphabeta+, and gammadelta+ intraepithelial lymphocytes, mucosal HLA-DR expression, and serum endomysial, reticulin, and gliadin antibodies were investigated. RESULTS: Forty of 52 long-term-treated patients adhered to a strict wheat starch-based diet and 6 to a strict naturally gluten-free diet; 6 patients had dietary lapses. In the 46 patients on a strict diet the villous architecture, enterocyte height, and density of alphabeta+ intraepithelial lymphocytes were similar to those in non-coeliac subjects and better than in short-term-treated coeliac patients. The density of gammadelta(+)cells was higher, but they seemed to decrease over time with the gluten-free diet. Wheat starch-based gluten-free flour products did not cause aberrant up-regulation of mucosal HLA-DR. The mucosal integrity was not dependent on the daily intake of wheat starch in all patients on a strict diet, whereas two of the six patients with dietary lapses had villous atrophy and positive serology. CONCLUSION: Wheat starch-based gluten-free flour products were not harmful in the treatment of coeliac disease and dermatitis herpetiformis.
  13. Celiac.com 03/26/2007 - Ongoing digestive symptoms and other systemic problems for individuals with Celiac Disease who are on a gluten free diet are fairly common. While Celiac Disease itself is becoming more widely recognized, its effects on multiple parts of the body and its ongoing symptoms remain more obscure. While this article is not meant to provide medical advice, it is intended to provide a summary of possible causes that you and your health care provider may want to explore further. Celiac Disease Follow Up Treatment After a diagnosis of Celiac Disease is made, additional follow up tests are recommended immediately after diagnosis and on an ongoing basis. These include: Blood work for vitamin and mineral deficiencies Thyroid Screen (note: Patients on thyroid replacement and other medications may need frequent Monitoring for dosage adjustment as their absorption improves.) Bone density scan Liver enzymes Research from Stanford University School of Medicines Celiac Management Clinic is noting continued absorption problems with many individuals who are on a gluten free diet. A 72 hour quantitative fecal fat test and a 25-gram xylose sugar absorption test can help diagnose continued absorption problems. Healing progress on the gluten-free diet may be monitored by re-testing whichever diagnostic blood test was initially highest, at an interval of 6 - 12 months. Children are likely to heal within a few months; adults may take a few years, and some may never totally heal. Note: Calcium and Iron status will improve in most individuals even without supplements once the intestine heals. Several doctors recommend NOT prescribing drugs such as Fosamax and Evista until after the intestine heals and more calcium is being absorbed from the diet. Celiac Disease and Ongoing Symptoms After a Gluten-Free Diet Most individuals will experience a significant decrease of symptoms within a few weeks or months of starting a gluten free diet. However, some individuals may continue to experience significant digestive problems or may have a relapse of symptoms. Some possible explanations are summarized below: Hidden Gluten Exposure Look for any possible sources of gluten exposure. Binders in medication, cross contamination, misunderstanding of the strictness required of the diet, etc. should be explored. Repeat blood tests might give an indication of continued gluten exposure; however these may not be sensitive enough to note low level exposure. Lactose Intolerance Especially during the healing phase of celiac disease, intolerance to lactose, a protein found in dairy products, may be seen. Enzymes needed to digest lactose are manufactured by the intestinal villi, which have been damaged by exposure to gluten. Often once the villi have regrown, symptoms of lactose intolerance will subside. Testing includes Lactose H2 breath testing. Suggested treatment includes using an over-the-counter lactose enzyme when ingesting dairy products. Re-colonizing the small intestine with beneficial bacteria (see probiotics, below) is also recommended. Helicobacter Pylori A study by Villanacci, et. al, published 8/28/2006 in the American Journal of Gastroenterology noted that 44% of individuals diagnosed with celiac disease tested positive for Helicobacter Pylori at the time of, or within 1 year of their celiac disease diagnosis. Small Bowel Bacterial Overgrowth In a report published in the American Journal of Gastroenterology, Vol. 98, No. 4, 2003 of 15 persons with continuing symptoms, 10 showed evidence of overgrowth of bacteria within the small bowel. Testing included Lactulose H2 breath testing. Suggested treatment includes the non-systemic, prescription antibiotic, Rifaximin (800 mg. per day for one week). Note that the antibiotic used is called Rifaximin in England and Xifaxam in the U.S. Digestive function should also be evaluated as the underlying cause of SBBO. Yeast Overgrowth Some individuals report continuing symptoms due to overgrowth of yeast. Testing includes blood antibody testing for Candida. Suggested treatment includes ½ tsp Nystatin powder (mix with water), twice a day and 200 mg Ketoconizole once per day for 2-3 months. Monthly liver function testing during treatment is recommended. Nystatin powder may be ordered, by prescription, through pharmacies which offer custom compounding of medications. Digestive function should also be evaluated as the underlying cause of yeast overgrowth. Dietary changes may also be considered. Other Food Sensitivities Additional IgG food sensitivities may be seen. An IgG sensitivity is different from the IgE allergies most allergy doctors check for. Common food sensitivities include dairy casein, corn, soy and eggs. Treatment includes avoiding the food, and food rotation. There are some reports of a reduction of food sensitivities when digestive function improves. Digestive Function Multiple problems with digestive function may be found. A complete evaluation should be done. One source for a comprehensive stool analysis may be obtained, by mail and by prescription. Intestinal Motility Increased intestinal motility may contribute to continuing diarrhea. Try reducing motility by using a fiber supplement like Benefiber or Citracel. Particularly in individuals who have had their gall bladder removed, consider Cholestid, a prescription drug used for lowering cholesterol, which may also slow motility. It acts by binding to irritating bile salts. Decreased Stomach Acid Low stomach acid (hypochlohydria) may interfere with the effectiveness of ones own digestive enzymes and may create an environment that encourages yeast or bacterial overgrowth. Additional information may be found in the book "Why Stomach Acid is Good for You" by Wright & Lenard. Testing may be done using the Heidleberg Capsule or Gastrocap tests. Supplemental Betaine HCl, bitters, digestive enzymes and probiotics, available at a health food store, may be helpful. Beneficial Bacteria Probiotics are very helpful for regaining the balance of the intestinal flora. Use ones that have multiple kinds of bacteria. The ones found in the refrigerated section of health food stores will have the highest level of bacteria. Kefir, raw kimchee and raw sauerkraut, also found in the refrigerated section, have high levels of active cultures. Digestive Enzymes Pancreatic enzymes assist with more complete digestion, discouraging unhealthy bacterial growth. Recommendations have been made for the vegetable based enzymes Which may be ordered through the internet or found in health food stores. Animal derived enzymes are available by prescription. Experiment to see what works best. To avoid heartburn, start by sprinkling ½ of a capsule on food & increase as needed and tolerated. Be sure to carefully check the Gluten-Free status of all enzymes. It is common for the Maltase to be made from barley. Carbohydrate intolerance Some individuals do not digest carbohydrates and sugars well. The undigested carbohydrates encourage the growth of harmful yeasts and bacteria. More information on a diet low in carbohydrates may be found in the book "Breaking the Vicious Cycle" by Gottschall. She recommends eliminating all complex carbohydrates to kill off the bad bacteria. Parasites and other bacterial problems Check for parasites and other bacterial problems, including Giardia lamblia and Ascaris lumbricoides. Just because an individual has celiac disease, doesnt mean they cant have the bugs that a normal person with diarrhea may have! Other Autoimmune Diseases At least 1/3 of the people diagnosed with celiac disease as adults will also have another autoimmune disease. Many report a significant improvement in their other autoimmune disease after beginning a gluten free diet. However, some individuals with celiac disease may develop other autoimmune diseases even after beginning a gluten free diet. Watch for Type 1 diabetes, liver, thyroid, pancreas and adrenal diseases, peripheral and central nervous system damage, connective tissue and other rheumatoid inflammations. Ms. Anderies also serves as a member of the Denver Metro Chapter of CSA/USA Medical Education Committee
  14. Celiac.com 11/03/2016 - Refractory celiac disease type II (RCDII) often transforms into an enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma (EATL), a serious condition that requires intensive treatment. Current treatment strategies for RCDII include cladribine(2-CdA) and autologous stem cell transplantation (auSCT). A team of researchers recently set out to assess long-term survival in refractory celiac disease type II, and to define clear prognostic criteria for EATL development comparing two treatment strategies. They also wanted to evaluate histological response as prognostic factor. The research team included P Nijeboer, RLJ van Wanrooij, T van Gils, NJ Wierdsma, GJ Tack, BI Witte, HJ Bontkes, O Visser, CJJ Mulder, and G Bouma. They are variously affiliated with the Department of Gastroenterology, the Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, the Department of Pathology, and the Department of Haematology at VU University Medical Centre in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. For their study, they retrospectively analyzed 45 patients. All patients received 2-CdA, after which they were either closely monitored (monotherapy, n=30) or received a step-up approach, including auSCT (step-up therapy, n=15). Ten patients (22%) developed EATL, nine of whom had received monotherapy. Absence of histological remission after monotherapy was associated with EATL development (p=0.010). A total of 20 patients (44%) died, with an average survival of 84 months. Overall survival (OS) in the monotherapy group was far better in those with complete histological remission compared to those with without histological remission. The monotherapy patients, who achieved complete histological remission, showed comparable EATL occurrence and OS as compared to the step-up therapy group (p=0.80 and p=0.14 respectively). Histological response is an accurate parameter to evaluate the effect of 2-CdA therapy and this parameter should be leading in the decisions whether or not to perform a step-up treatment approach in RCDII. Source: United European Gastroenterology Journal, April 2016; DOI: 10.1177/2050640616646529
  15. Celiac.com 04/04/2016 - Any one eager to try the first approved treatment for celiac disease might not have to wait much longer. Alba Therapeutics has announced that their celiac treatment, larazotide acetate, will enter the first Phase 3 clinical trials ever conducted in a celiac disease drug later this year. Lorazotide acetate works by improving regulation of tight junctions in the bowel. In healthy people, these junctions remain closed except to shed dead cells, but in patients with celiac disease, gluten keeps tight junctions open, triggering an inflammatory reaction that eventually destroys the intestinal villi, tiny, finger-like projections in the small intestine that are essential for nutrient absorption. Early research suggests larazotide acetate helps to keep the tight junctions closed when it's taken before a meal, thus stopping, or reducing the reaction and the resulting inflammation. Larazotide acetate recently completed during phase 2b clinical trials for efficacy, safety and tolerability in 342 patients with celiac disease. Those trials showed larazotide acetate to be safe and effective in a "real world setting" for celiac patients, according to Alba's website. The treatment is now headed to Phase 3 trials in "late 2016", and has received "fast track" designation from the Food and Drug Administration. Alba has announced that Innovate Biopharmaceuticals Inc. has licensed all of Alba Therapeutics' assets related to larazotide acetate, and that larazotide acetate has been renamed INN-202. If approved on schedule, INN-202 will become the first prescription medicine for treating celiac disease. Source: Allergic Living
  16. Celiac.com 10/03/2014 - Celiac disease patients in Australia have shown a major improvement in gluten tolerance after receiving experimental hookworm treatments. The study is part of an effort to determine if parasitic helminths, such as hookworm, might help to treat inflammatory disorders, including celiac disease. In this case, the research team assessed the influence of experimental hookworm infection on the predicted outcomes of three escalating gluten challenges in volunteers with confirmed celiac disease. The research team included John Croese, MD, Paul Giacomin, PhD, Severine Navarro, PhD, Andrew Clouston, MD, Leisa McCann, RN, Annette Dougall, PhD, Ivana Ferreira, BSc, Atik Susianto, MD, Peter O'Rourke, PhD, Mariko Howlett, MD, James McCarthy, MD, Christian Engwerda, PhD, Dianne Jones, BHSc, and Alex Loukas, PhD. They are variously affiliated with the Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology at The Prince Charles Hospital, Brisbane, Australia, the Center for Biodiscovery and Molecular Development of Therapeutics at the Australian Institute of Tropical Health and Medicine of James Cook University in Cairns, Australia, Envoi Specialist Pathologists in Brisbane, Australia, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute in Brisbane, Australia, the Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, and with Logan Hospital, Brisbane, Australia. This particular study followed twelve adult volunteers with diet-managed celiac disease. The volunteers were inoculated with 20 Necator americanus (hookworm) larvae, and then consumed increasing amounts of gluten in the form of spaghetti. The volunteers first received 10 to 50 milligrams for 12 weeks (microchallenge); they then received 25 milligrams daily + 1 gram twice weekly for 12 weeks (GC-1g); and finally 3 grams daily (60-75 straws of spaghetti) for 2 weeks (GC-3g). The subjects were then evaluated for symptomatic, serologic, and histological outcomes of gluten toxicity. They were also examined for regulatory and inflammatory T cell populations in blood and mucosa. Two gluten-intolerant subjects withdrew after micro-challenge. Ten completed GC-1g, and eight of these ten volunteers enrolled in and completed the full course of the study. Most celiacs who are exposed to gluten challenge will show adverse changes in the intestinal villi, which is measured in terms of villous height-to-crypt depth ratios. Also, such patients will usually show an increase in blood antibodies, such as IgA-tissue transglutaminase, indiucating an adverse reaction to gluten. However, the results here showed that median villous height-to-crypt depth ratios (2.60-2.63; P = .98) did not decrease as predicted after GC-1g. Moreover, mean IgA-tissue transglutaminase titers declined, contrary to the predicted rise after GC-3g. Other results showed that quality of life scores improved (46.3-40.6; P = .05); while celiac symptom indices (24.3-24.3; P = .53), intra-epithelial lymphocyte percentages (32.5-35.0; P = .47), and Marsh scores remained unchanged by gluten challenge. Intestinal T cells expressing IFNγ were reduced following hookworm infection (23.9%-11.5%; P = .04), with corresponding increases in CD4+ Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (0.19%-1.12%; P = .001). Hookworms in the form of Necator americanus promoted tolerance and stabilized, or improved, all tested measures of gluten toxicity in volunteers with celiac disease. So, after being voluntarily infected with 20 hookworms, these celiac disease volunteers were able to eat increasingly large amounts of gluten with none of the usual changes or adverse symptoms. Could hookworm treatments represent the future of treatment for celiac disease, and maybe other inflammatory conditions? Clearly, further tests are needed to determine exactly how safe it is for celiac patients receiving this treatment to eat gluten. So far, however, the future looks bright. What do you think? If swallowing a small dose of hookworms would eliminate your adverse reactions, and allow you to safely eat gluten, would you do it? The radio program Radiolab has an interesting segment on hookworm, which you can stream here: Radiolab Source: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaci.2014.07.022
  17. Celiac.com 06/21/2016 - Transitioning from childhood to adulthood is hard, but doing it with celiac disease can be harder. Beginning in adolescence, people with celiac disease should assume full responsibility for their care. So how can a parent best help teens transition to full control over their celiac disease and gluten-free diet? According to the Prague Consensus Report, a few simple measures can help children to successfully manage caring for their conditions as they transition into teenagers and young adults. One of the study's authors is Dr. Steffen Husby of Hans Christian Andersen Children's Hospital, Odense University Hospital in Denmark. Get a Formal Diagnosis "We think it most important to stress that celiac disease is a definite disorder," Husby told Reuters Health. "We should make a regular diagnosis of celiac disease before putting kids on a gluten free diet." Consult a Doctor About Transition "We recommend close communication with the doctor when transitioning to adult care," said Dr. Husby. Ideally, teens with celiac disease should visit a clinic with pediatric and adult services that handles such transitions, the study authors write. Talk About the Transition Talk with a doctor about dietary adherence and consequences of non-adherence during transition. Consider asking your child's pediatrician to include a "transition document," which includes written information on the patient's diagnosis, follow-up, body composition data, other health conditions and dietary compliance. Know the Importance of Biopsy The authors also conclude that most teens and young adults do not need routine small intestine biopsies to reconfirm a childhood diagnosis of celiac disease, unless pediatric diagnostic criteria, like a blood test for gluten antibodies, were never fulfilled, according to the recommendations published online April 18 in the journal Gut. In most adolescents and young adults, routine small intestinal biopsy is not needed to reconfirm a childhood diagnosis of celiac disease, based on criteria set by the European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (ESPGHAN) or North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (NASPGHAN). However, biopsy may be advisable in patients who did not have biopsy at diagnosis, or when other pediatric diagnostic criteria are incomplete, if additional endomysium antibody test have not been performed to confirm 10-fold positivity of tissue transglutaminase antibodies, or in cases of asymptomatic children who may have been followed a no biopsy strategy to that point. Young people tend not to register risk for future health consequences, whether the risk is lung cancer as a result of smoking or osteoporosis as a result of eating gluten, says Dr. Patience White, co-director of Got Transition, the Center for Health Care Transition Improvement at the National Alliance to Advance Adolescent Health in Washington, D.C. "All youth…need a better transition," she added. These simple steps can help teens to manage their own celiac disease as they progress into adulthood. Source: Gut 2016.
  18. Hey guys! I’m a graphic design junior, and we are in the first semester of our capstone. My mom was diagnosed with celiac, so I’m really passionate about helping make the post diagnosis life a little easier. I’m not sure what specific problem within celiac disease to tackle. I have found it helpful to talk to those with celiac about what they find most frustrating or challenging. If anyone has any suggestions on what is most frustrating or what you wished you had to help, it would be much much appreciated!
  19. Celiac.com 02/04/2016 - BL-7010, a non-absorbable, orally available co-polymer for the treatment of celiac disease, has received designation as Class IIb medical device in the European Union, according to manufacturer BioLineRx Ltd. This designation clears path for BioLine’s BL-7010 program, and allows the company to plan the next steps in the development of a commercial version of BL-7010. BL-7010 shows a high affinity for gliadins, the proteins in gluten that trigger celiac disease. BL-710 works by sequestering gliadins, effectively masking them from enzymatic breakdown, and blocks the formation of immunogenic peptides that trigger the adverse immune reactions in people with celiac disease. This results in a significantly reduced immune response triggered by gluten. Together with the gluten, BL-7010 passes harmlessly through the digestive tract and is not absorbed into the blood. The safety and efficacy of BL-7010 have been demonstrated in a number of pre-clinical studies, including a Phase 1/2 study completed in November 2014. In prepared comments, BioLineRX CEO Kinneret Savitsky, Ph.D., said that the company is "excited to receive confirmation for the medical device designation pathway in Europe for our BL-7010 program," and is now planning the next steps in the development of this product, including the next clinical efficacy study which we expect to commence in mid-2016." The company also continues to "evaluate the potential of BL-7010 as a food supplement," said Dr. Savitsky. Read more at: PRNewswire.
  20. Found this article and it made me cringe. I highly doubt that I will allow this to be done to me! http://www.iflscience.com/health-and-medicine/parasitic-worms-trialed-treatment-celiac-disease
  21. This article originally appeared in the Spring 2009 edition of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. Celiac.com 05/15/2010 - Willem-Karel Dicke was born in 1905, in Dordrecht, Holland, and died Utrecht in 1962. Dicke was a Dutch pediatrician, the first clinician to develop the gluten-free diet, and to prove that certain types of flour cause relapses in celiac disease patients. From 1922 until 1929, Dicke studied medicine in Leiden. He then specialized in pediatrics in Juliana Children’s Hospital in The Hague from 1929 until 1933. In 1936, at just 31 years of age, he was named medical director of the hospital. In the 1940s and 1950s he went on to formally establish the gluten-free diet, forever changing treatment methods and clinical outcomes of children suffering from celiac disease. By 1952, Dicke recognized that the disease is caused by the ingestion of wheat proteins, not carbohydrates. From the late 1880s into the 1920s and 30s, doctors like R. A. Gibbons, Sidney Haas and others pioneered the use of specialty diets to treat celiac disease. Diets such as the banana diet, the fruit diet, the carbohydrate diet (fruit, puree of potatoes or tomatoes), the beefsteak diet, the milk diet had all been tried, with some success. In his now seminal 1950 thesis on celiac disease and wheat-free diet, Dicke lays out the results of the detailed dietary study he conducted over several years at the Juliana Children’s Hospital on a patient with celiac disease. The study likely had its earliest beginnings at the advent of Dicke’s promotion to medical director, if not slightly before. From the testimony of Dicke’s wife in 1991, we know that Dicke was convinced of the beneficial effect of wheat free diet even before 1940. She confirmed that between 1934 and 1936, Dicke began to conduct experiments with wheat free diets confirming Christopher Booth’s comments in The Lancet, Feb 25, 1989: “It was a young mother’s statement of her celiac child’s rash improving rapidly if she removed bread from the diet that alerted his interest,” when Dicke was a pediatrician in The Hague in 1936. Dicke published his first report on a wheat-free diet in Het Nederlands Tijdschrift voor Geneeskunde in 1941. (W. K. Dicke: A simple diet for Gee-Herter’s Syndrome). At the time, celiac was still called Gee-Herter’s syndrome. It reads, in part: “In recent literature it is stated that the diet of Haas (Banana-diet) and Fanconi (fruit and vegetables) gives the best results in the treatment of patients suffering from coeliac disease. At present (World War II) these items are not available. Therefore, I give a simple diet, which is helping these children at this time of rationing. The diet should not contain any bread or rusks. A hot meal twice a day is also well tolerated. The third meal can be sweet or sour porridge (without any wheat flour).” In the Netherlands, the last winter of World War II, the winter of 1944/45 became known as the ‘Winter of Hunger.’ Delivery of regular food staples, such as bread, was largely disrupted, especially in the western part of the country. This meant that people had to turn to uncommon foods, such as tulip bulbs, for sustenance. It was during this time that Dicke became even more convinced that eating less grain, along with unusual foods, such as tulip bulbs, improved the clinical condition of his patients. Dicke’s next major confirmation came when Allied planes started dropping bread in the Netherlands, and these same children began to deteriorate rapidly. After World War II, Dicke conducted a series of experiments with standardized diets were performed on four children in the Wilhelmina Children’s Hospital in Utrecht and in one child in the Juliana Children’s Hospital in The Hague. These experiments involved excluding or adding wheat or rye flour over long periods in the diets of these children with coeliac disease. In Dicke’s post-war experiments, children were challenged with different cereals under a strict dietary protocol with measurement of total fecal output, fecal fat content, and the fat absorption coefficient was calculated. Dicke worked closely with biochemist J. H. van de Kamer of the Netherlands Central Institute for Nutritional Research TNO in Utrecht, who developed the first accurate and easily available method for measure fecal fat content in wet feces. Dicke also worked closely with H. A. Weyers, a pediatrician from the Wilhelmina Children’s Hospital in Utrecht, who developed a method that used the coefficient of fat absorption to analyze fecal fat excretion in children with celiac disease. Based on these findings Dicke concluded in his 1950 thesis that wheat flour, but not well-purified wheat starch (amylum), and also rye flour, triggered the anorexia, the increased fecal output, and the streatorrhea common in celiac patients. Dicke presented his doctoral thesis on the subject at the University of Utrecht in 1950. Dicke’s 1950 thesis refers to a celiac disease patient he treated in 1936. The patient’s symptoms disappeared and he returned to normal weight and growth patterns after following a strict wheat free diet in the hospital. However, each time the boy went home and was unable to maintain a wheat free diet, he suffered a decline in his growth curve. Dicke charted these advances and reversals over four long-term admissions. Each time the trend towards normal growth was restored. In his thesis, Dicke presents several growth curves of children treated with a wheat free diet. In long term studies over several years he shows that, with a wheat free diet, these children gain weight, reaching normal growth patterns when compared with age matched controls. At the end of chapter 3 of his thesis he concludes that: “- if certain types of meal, such as wheat and rye are replaced in the daily diet, the patient improves; - acute attacks of diarrhea, do not occur, provided these types of meal are not given; - after a latent period which can vary in length, deterioration and acute attacks of diarrhea re-occur, if the objectionable types of meal are added to the diet too soon....” In 1953, together with van de Kamer and Weyers, he subsequently published Coeliac disease IV “An investigation into the injurious constituents of wheat in connection with their action on patients with coeliac disease.” They wrote that the alcohol soluble or the gliadin component of the water insoluble protein of wheat was responsible for the fat malabsorption in patients with celiac disease. Although these findings were quickly confirmed by researchers in Britain, Scandinavia, and Germany, some researchers, especially in America, questioned the wisdom of a gluten free diet. After the establishment of the intestinal biopsy technique for the diagnosis of celiac disease, it became apparent that a wheat free diet should be maintained for long periods before an adequate response occurred, as Dicke had predicted. In 1954, Dr. Dicke, Charlotte Anderson, and a number of their colleagues, confirmed these findings, and described the damage to the lining of the small intestine as being directly related to celiac disease. In 1957 he was appointed a professor of Utrecht University and became a medical director of Wilhelmina Children’s Hospital. To honor Willem Karel Dicke, Netherland’s Society of Gastroenterology established a gold medal in his name, to be presented to pioneering researchers in the field. Willem Dicke himself was named as the recipient of the first gold Dicke Medal. Dr. Dicke died in 1962 of cerebrovascular disease. He was just 57 years old. Jefferson Adams is a freelance writer living in San Francisco. His poems, essays and photographs have appeared in Antioch Review, Blue Mesa Review, CALIBAN, Hayden’s Ferry Review, Huffington Post, the Mississippi Review, and Slate among others. Sources: Willem Dicke. Brilliant Clinical Observer and Translational Investigator. Discoverer of the Toxic Cause of Celiac Disease, by David Yan and Peter R. Holt , M.D. DOI: 10.1111/j.1752-8062.2009.00167.x GUT 1993; 34:1473-1475 Mulder, C. “Pioneer in Glutenfree diet: Willem Karel Dicke 1905-1962 Over 50 Years of Gluten Free Diet.” appended to: English translation by C. Mulder June 1, 1993 of Dicke, W.K. “Coeliac Disease Investigation of Harmful Effects of Certain Types of Cereal on Patients Suffering from Coeliac Disease.” Ph. D. Thesis, State University of Utrecht, 1950
  22. Celiac.com 08/12/2015 - There are numerous pills, enzymes, and other products in development that are all designed to provide moderate protection against accidental gluten exposure to people with celiac disease to gluten-intolerance. Can a new pill, which uses egg yolk antibodies to coat gluten, allowing it to pass from the body without harm, find a place on the crowded roster of contenders? Driven by a desire to provide relief for people with celiac disease, Hoon Sunwoo, an associate professor of pharmaceutical sciences, has spent the last 10 years working on the proprietary pill. If Hoon has his way, people with celiac disease may soon be able to enjoy bread, pasta and other gluten products without suffering headaches, digestion problems and severe intestinal damage that come with the adverse gluten reactions of celiac disease. The pill works by using egg yolk antibodies to coat the gluten and allow it to pass from the body without doing any damage. While not a cure, Sunwoo's pill, now under development at the University of Alberta, may allow those people to join friends for a beer and pizza. Sunwoo makes it very clear that his pill is not a cure or long-term treatment solution, and the people with the disease should still follow a strict gluten-free diet. The pill is designed to be eaten by a person with celiac disease five minutes before eating or drinking, and would provide protection from an adverse gluten reaction for the next one or two hours. The pill completed safety clinical trials two months ago and is expected to begin efficacy clinical trials next year. Read more at CBC.CA.
  23. Celiac.com 12/16/2014 - Will people with celiac disease spend money on drugs designed to reduce or eliminate adverse reactions to gluten? Drug researchers and investors are betting they will. Currently, the only proven treatment for celiac disease is a strict gluten-free diet. However, a number of companies are looking to debut drugs for treating celiac disease in the next five years, With that in mind, Abhilok Garg, Ph.D., an immunology analyst with research and consulting firm GlobalData, is projecting sales such drugs in the US and five major European markets Germany, France, Spain, Italy and the UK, to reach approximately $551.1 million by 2023. The launches of Alba/Teva’s larazotide acetate, Alvine/AbbVie’s latiglutenase, and BioLineRX’s BL-7010 portend a new world of therapies for the estimated 600,000 diagnosed celiac patients in these countries. With early trials looking promising and no obvious problems on the horizon, analysts expect larazotide acetate to enter the US and 5EU markets in Q1 2018 and Q1 2019, respectively, followed by latiglutenase in Q1 2019 and Q1 2020. Latiglutenase is currently being developed as a chronic drug treatment, GlobalData’s interviews with KOLs have indicated that clinical experience with this drug could dictate the way it is prescribed to patients, and that it may in some cases be used as an “on demand” treatment,” says Dr. Garg. Larazotide acetate works by modulating tight junctions (TJs) in the small bowel epithelium, and has tried to maximize recent research showing that people with celiac disease do have altered intracellular spaces and TJ structures in the lower esophagus. BL-7010 works by sequestering gliadins, effectively masking them from enzymatic degradation and preventing the formation of immunogenic peptides that trigger an adverse immune reaction when people with celiac disease consume wheat. BL-7010 has cleared early trial hurdles and been found to be safe and well tolerated in both single and repeated-dose administrations. Does the idea of a reliable treatment for celiac disease appeal to you? Would you try such drugs, or just stick with the gluten-free diet? Source: Pharmabiz.com
  24. Celiac.com 01/12/2015 - Ghrelin is a peptide that plays an important role in regulating the distribution and rate of use of energy. When the stomach is empty, ghrelin is secreted. When the stomach is stretched, secretion stops. Gherlin has also been shown to have protective effects throughout the gastrointestinal tract. A team of researchers recently investigated the protective effect of gherlin in celiac disease induced in rats. The research team included L.R. Nikoukar, F. Nabavizadeh, S.M. Mohamadi, A. Moslehi, G. Hassanzadeh, H. Nahrevanian, and S. Agah. They are affiliated with the Department of Anatomy, the Department of Liver and Gastrointestinal Research, and the Department of Physiology at the School of Medicine at Tehran University of Medical Sciences, and the Department of Parasitology at the Pasteur Institute of Iran, all in Tehran. The team divided twenty-four rat pups with celiac disease into 4 groups as follows: a normal non-celiac control group; a celiac disease group, which received 1.5 mg/g intragastric gliadin; pretreatment celiac group that received 50 ng/g intraperitoneal ghrelin before receiving 1.5 mg/g intragastric gliadin; a co-treatment celiac group that received 50 ng/g intraperitoneal ghrelin after receiving 1.5 mg/g intragastric gliadin). The team then charted the animals' weight gain. The team assessed the results by comparing villus length, villus width, crypt depth and number of intraepithelial lymphocytes. They also compared tissue interferon-gamma as quantified by ELISA, and used ANOVA to compare results statistically. Results showed that the disease group had shortened villi, while the villi in the pretreatment and co-treatment groups were as long as those of the control group. Crypt depth was increased in the celiac disease group, but became normal in the co-treatment group. The number of intraepithelial lymphocytes was substantially higher in the celiac disease group than the control group, while the team saw no difference between co-treatment and control groups. Disease and control animals weighed equally at the end of the experiment, but ghrelin-treated animals had significantly gained more weight than either of the two other groups. Also, there was no significant difference between the groups in terms of interferon-gamma measurement. From these results, the team concluded administration of ghrelin led to histological improvement of celiac disease, and that the effects were “more obvious if administered after exposure to gliadin.” Certainly, the revelation that a drug that is already part of the human body can allow a person with celiac disease to show totally normal blood tests and undamaged villi after consuming gluten is kind of exciting. However, because gherlin is so closely tied with hunger and satiation responses, and because these results have not been borne out in humans, it is unclear how it might be used to treat human celiac disease. Clearly, more research is needed, and will likely follow. Stay tuned for any important developments on the role of ghrelin in treating celiac disease. Source: Acta Physiol Hung. 2014 Dec;101(4):438-47. doi: 10.1556/APhysiol.101.2014.4.5.
  25. Celiac.com 12/09/2014 - Biopharmaceutical company BioLineRx Ltd., has announced successful final results from its Phase 1/2 study for BL-7010, a novel co-polymer for the treatment of celiac disease. BL-7010 is a new, non-absorbable, orally available co-polymer intended for the treatment of celiac disease. The drug works by sequestering gliadins, effectively masking them from enzymatic degradation and preventing the formation of immunogenic peptides that trigger an adverse immune reaction when people with celiac disease consume wheat. This significantly reduces the immune response triggered by gluten. BL-7010 is excreted with gliadin from the digestive tract and is not absorbed into the blood. The trial results showed BL-7010 to be safe and well tolerated in both single- and repeated-doses, and pharmacokinetic analyses revealed no systemic exposure of BL-7010 in plasma and urine samples. The company has also settled on a one gram, three times per day regimen of BL-7010 as the optimal repeated dose for an upcoming randomized, placebo-controlled efficacy study set to begin in the last half of 2015. The absence of systemic exposure will likely support a medical-device classification for BL-7010, which would significantly accelerate its development in Europe. Source: Marketwatch.com