Jump to content
  • Sign Up

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'treatments'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Celiac Disease: Diagnosis, Recovery, Related Disorders & Research
    • Gluten-Free and Celiac Disease Calendar of Events
    • Celiac Disease - Pre-Diagnosis, Testing & Symptoms
    • Celiac Disease - Post Diagnosis, Recovery/Treatment(s)
    • Celiac Disease - Related Disorders & Research
    • Dermatitis Herpetiformis
    • Gluten Intolerance and Behavior
  • Celiac Disease Support & Help
    • Celiac Disease - Coping With
    • Celiac Disease - Parents of Kids or Babies With Celiac Disease
    • Gab/Chat Room - To Discuss Anything BUT Celiac Disease / Gluten-Free Diet
    • Celiac Disease - Doctors
    • Celiac Disease - Teenagers & Young Adults Only
    • Celiac Disease - Pregnancy
    • Celiac Disease - Friends and Loved Ones of Celiacs
    • Celiac Meeting Room
    • Celiac Disease - Sleep
    • Celiac Disease - Support Groups
  • Gluten-Free Lifestyle
    • Gluten-Free Foods, Products, Shopping & Medications
    • Gluten-Free Recipes - Baking & Cooking Tips
    • Gluten-Free Restaurants
    • Gluten-Free Ingredients & Food Labeling Issues
    • Celiac Disease - Publications & Publicity
    • Gluten-Free Travel
    • Gluten-Free Diet & Weight Issues
    • Gluten-Free International Room (Outside USA)
    • Gluten-Free Sports and Fitness
  • When A Gluten-Free Diet Just Isn't Enough
    • Other Food Intolerance and Leaky Gut Issues
    • Super Sensitive Celiacs & Gluten Sensitive
    • Alternative Diets
  • Forum Technical Assistance
    • Board/Forum Technical Help
  • DFW/Central Texas Celiacs's Events
  • DFW/Central Texas Celiacs's Groups/Organizations in the DFW area

Blogs

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.

Categories

  • Celiac.com Sponsors
  • Celiac Disease
  • Safe Gluten-Free Food List / Unsafe Foods & Ingredients
  • Gluten-Free Food & Product Reviews
  • Gluten-Free Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: American & International Foods
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Biscuits, Rolls & Buns
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Noodles & Dumplings
    • Gluten-Free Dessert Recipes: Pastries, Cakes, Cookies, etc.
    • Gluten-Free Bread Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Flour Mixes
    • Gluten-Free Kids Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Snacks & Appetizers
    • Gluten-Free Muffin Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Pancake Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Pizza Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Soups, Sauces, Dressings & Chowders
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Cooking Tips
    • Gluten-Free Scone Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Waffle Recipes
  • Celiac Disease Diagnosis, Testing & Treatment
  • Miscellaneous Information on Celiac Disease
    • Additional Celiac Disease Concerns
    • Celiac Disease Research Projects, Fundraising, Epidemiology, Etc.
    • Conferences, Publicity, Pregnancy, Church, Bread Machines, Distillation & Beer
    • Gluten-Free Diet, Celiac Disease & Codex Alimentarius Wheat Starch
    • Gluten-Free Food Ingredient Labeling Regulations
    • Celiac.com Podcast Edition
  • Celiac Disease & Gluten Intolerance Research
  • Celiac Disease & Related Diseases and Disorders
    • Lists of Diseases and Disorders Associated with Celiac Disease
    • Addison's Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Anemia and Celiac Disease
    • Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia and Celiac Disease
    • Arthritis and Celiac Disease
    • Asthma and Celiac Disease
    • Ataxia, Nerve Disease, Neuropathy, Brain Damage and Celiac Disease
    • Attention Deficit Disorder and Celiac Disease
    • Autism and Celiac Disease
    • Bacterial Overgrowth and Celiac Disease
    • Cancer, Lymphoma and Celiac Disease
    • Candida Albicans and Celiac Disease
    • Canker Sores (Aphthous Stomatitis) & Celiac Disease
    • Casein / Cows Milk Intolerance and Celiac Disease
    • Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Celiac Disease
    • Cognitive Impairment and Celiac Disease
    • Crohn's Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Depression and Celiac Disease
    • Dermatitis Herpetiformis: Skin Condition Associated with Celiac Disease
    • Diabetes and Celiac Disease
    • Down Syndrome and Celiac Disease
    • Dyspepsia, Acid Reflux and Celiac Disease
    • Epilepsy and Celiac Disease
    • Eye Problems, Cataract and Celiac Disease
    • Fertility, Pregnancy, Miscarriage and Celiac Disease
    • Fibromyalgia and Celiac Disease
    • Flatulence (Gas) and Celiac Disease
    • Gall Bladder Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Gastrointestinal Bleeding and Celiac Disease
    • Geographic Tongue (Glossitis) and Celiac Disease
    • Growth Hormone Deficiency and Celiac Disease
    • Heart Failure and Celiac Disease
    • Infertility, Impotency and Celiac Disease
    • Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Intestinal Permeability and Celiac Disease
    • Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Celiac Disease
    • Kidney Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Liver Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Lupus and Celiac Disease
    • Malnutrition, Body Mass Index and Celiac Disease
    • Migraine Headaches and Celiac Disease
    • Multiple Sclerosis and Celiac Disease
    • Myasthenia Gravis Celiac Disease
    • Obesity, Overweight & Celiac Disease
    • Osteoporosis, Osteomalacia, Bone Density and Celiac Disease
    • Psoriasis and Celiac Disease
    • Refractory Celiac Disease & Collagenous Sprue
    • Sarcoidosis and Celiac Disease
    • Scleroderma and Celiac Disease
    • Schizophrenia / Mental Problems and Celiac Disease
    • Sepsis and Celiac Disease
    • Sjogrens Syndrome and Celiac Disease
    • Skin Problems and Celiac Disease
    • Sleep Disorders and Celiac Disease
    • Thrombocytopenic Purpura and Celiac Disease
    • Thyroid & Pancreatic Disorders and Celiac Disease
    • Tuberculosis and Celiac Disease
  • The Origins of Celiac Disease
  • Gluten-Free Grains and Flours
  • Oats and Celiac Disease: Are They Gluten-Free?
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Autumn 2018 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Summer 2018 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Spring 2018 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Winter 2018 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Autumn 2017 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Summer 2017 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Spring 2017 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Winter 2017 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Autumn 2016 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Summer 2016 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Spring 2016 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Winter 2016 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Autumn 2015 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Summer 2015 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Spring 2015 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Winter 2015 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Autumn 2014 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Summer 2014 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Spring 2014 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Winter 2014 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Autumn 2013 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Summer 2013 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Spring 2013 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Winter 2013 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Autumn 2012 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Summer 2012 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Spring 2012 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Winter 2012 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Autumn 2011 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Summer 2011 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Spring 2006 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Summer 2005 Issue
  • Celiac Disease Support Groups
    • United States of America: Celiac Disease Support Groups and Organizations
    • Outside the USA: Celiac Disease Support Groups and Contacts
  • Celiac Disease Doctor Listing
  • Kids and Celiac Disease
  • Gluten-Free Travel
  • Gluten-Free Cooking
  • Gluten-Free
  • Allergy vs. Intolerance
  • Tax Deductions for Gluten-Free Food
  • Gluten-Free Newsletters & Magazines
  • Gluten-Free & Celiac Disease Links
  • History of Celiac.com
    • History of Celiac.com Updates Through October 2007
    • Your E-mail in Support of Celiac.com 1996 to 2006

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Interests


Location

Found 14 results

  1. Celiac.com 03/27/2017 - A number of researchers are looking to provide alternative or adjunct treatments to the gluten-free diet in celiac disease. Meanwhile, a number of companies are currently developing a wide variety of such options, ranging from various kinds of enzyme therapies, to treatments that eliminate celiac disease reactions, even to vaccines to inoculate celiac sufferers against their condition, perhaps allowing for full recovery and a return to non-gluten-free eating habits, as desired. At least, that's one dream. More likely will be the development of enzymes or other treatments that offer celiacs varying degrees of protection from gluten ingestion. Most likely, such treatments would be designed to augment an existing gluten-free diet, and to provide protection against moderate gluten-contamination when eating out. One particular enzyme that shows strong potential in breaking down toxic peptides in A-gliadin, the main culprit in celiac reactions, is caricain. A recent paper discusses the scientific principles behind the use of caricain for enzyme therapy. The paper is based on a recent study, in which a team of researchers set out to review the structures of the toxic peptides in A-gliadin for key sequences of amino acids or motifs related to toxicity, especially with respect to digestive difficulties, or immunogenicity. The research team included Hugh J. Cornell and Teodor Stelmasiak. They are affiliated with the RMIT University, School of Applied Sciences, Melbourne, Australia, and with Glutagen Pty Ltd, Maribyrnong, Victoria, Australia. For their study, they first evaluated structures of synthetic A-gliadin peptides shown to be toxic in the fetal chick assay, both before and after digestion with duodenal mucosa from patients in long remission. They also measured synthetic peptides corresponding to the undigested residues, and compared the key amino acid sequences, to see if they might be related to direct toxicity and immunogenicity of the peptides. They found that the smallest toxic peptides from celiac mucosal digestion were octa-peptides, which they found in greater amounts than similar products from normal digestion. One of those peptides corresponded to residues 12-19 of A-gliadin and contained the key motifs PSQQ and QQQP of De Ritis et al., while the other corresponded to residues 72-79, and contained the key motif PYPQ (extending to PYPQPQ). These key motifs have been noted by other workers, especially those investigating immunological activity over the past two decades. They are present in undigested residues from celiac mucosal digestion These motifs, along with the greater prevalence of these residues, as compared with residues from normal digestion, supports the basic notions underpinning enzyme therapy for celiac disease. This study also supports the basic scientific merits of research and development of the enzyme caricain to break down gliadin peptides with two different types of toxicity, and thus to potentially benefit people with celiac disease. Source: International Journal of Celiac Disease. Vol. 4, No. 4, 2016, pp 113-120. doi: 10.12691/ijcd-4-4-2 Previous study: NCBI
  2. Thought I would go over what I have been on and done to treat my UC and see if it benefits anyone else. I was diagnosed almost exactly a year ago in February 2017. UC in different people has different flare triggers seemingly most common are Gluten, Diary, Soy. Some cases are Caffeine, Coffee, chocolate, Glucose, Fructose, Sucralose, Carbs. For me the 3 top ones, with sugars and carbs, and certain spices...coffee, caffeine, and chocolate seem fine....SUGAR was the worst causing not just bloody stools but moderate amounts of fruits or added sugars would cause distention. Before diagnosis I thought for years I had bad gut bacteria due to the swelling, gas, and bloody stools. I was originally put on Delzicol for it, but after losing my insurance and the prescriptions costing $680 I had to give it up. I turned to dropping all grains, sugars, starchy veggies, and using Marshmallow Powder (1tsp) twice a day. Recently after getting sick with a cold I started Thayers Slippery Elm Lozenges to deal with the sore throat and found that having 3-4 of them a day worked wonders with my UC....was more apparent when I tried getting off them and had a rebound flare that was really bad til I started them back up. And I drink 8oz of Aloe Vera Inner Fillet in a tea twice daily. SO 300-600mg of Thayers Slippery elm dosed out thought the day 1 tsp marshmallow root powder or 3 capsules from Natures Way twice a day 8oz Aloe Vera Inner Fillet twice a day with diet has kept it under control almost as good as the RX stuff I was on.....well the RX allowed me to have Mexican spices without flares which...now will flare me if I do not watch it.....I had to give up salsa. (Grew up in a mexican family....so this hit home) Love to see how others manage it and what others might have as triggers for their flares and the symptoms
  3. Celiac.com 09/18/2015 - That old saw about death and taxes might need a bit of amending to include complaints about pharmaceutical companies working on celiac drug treatments. One interesting facet of our coverage of the development of various drugs to treat and/or cure celiac disease has been the regular presence of comments questioning the motives,and actions of the companies involved. It's funny, but no one complains that companies still make money selling aspirin, and that no one has cured a headache, and that there must be some conspiracy to profit off of those who suffer a headache. There's no doubt that there's money to be made producing drugs that treat disease. But, if a company can develop and produce a safe drug to protect celiacs against contamination, or to help reduce symptoms, what's wrong with that? Just like an aspirin, I can take it or not take it. In the old days, ten years ago or more, people with celiac disease generally suffered in silence, with scant gluten-free food choices, and little information. However, in just a decade, we've got a wealth of information, and multi-billion dollar gluten-free foods market and a number of companies developing drugs to treat or cure celiac disease. To me, that's a good thing. Still, there are naysayers. Here's a rundown of comments by readers who seem less than enthused about celiac drugs in development. Our recent article, An Update on Every Celiac Disease Drug Currently in Development included the comment: "Article's fine. Concept's disturbing. Eating a gluten-free diet is the free, already-proven cure for celiac and gluten-intolerance. They don't have to torture mice and likely other animals to find a 'cure' for something that there already is a cure for. I imagine there is $$ for the researchers here and $$ for the animal labs and $$ for the pharmaceuticals." Of our article entitled, How Close Are New Celiac Disease Treatments? one reader wrote: "I would be very cautious about taking any of these until it was proven absolutely to have no side effects. There always are some and history has shown some to be deadly." Commenting on our article ALV003 Reduces Gluten Damage in Celiac Disease Patients, one reader commented: "I only want to know: how long until random internal organs begin to fail or malfunction as a result of yet another new mystery drug? I'd rather starve to death than be a guinea pig for big pharma again." Our article on NexVaxx, entitled Is a Vaccine for Celiac Disease Just Around the Corner? included the following comments: "Totally agree with vhill seems like a ploy to poison people with GMO foods that come up with a supposed "'cure'. Eat healthy whole foods this is not a curse its a wake up call to be healthy if you didn't have celiac you'd probably be eating processed crap." Balm wrote: "Thanks but no thanks. I'll remain a celiac and continue to eat healthy. While trying to fix one problem, some will end up with far worse problems." Jonnys wrote: "Stupid idea! Just another way to make more money off of people." These are but a few of the largely positive comments we receive, and we hope you enjoyed them as much as we do.
  4. Celiac.com 09/19/2017 - Hookworms. Intestinal parasites. They sound gross. The thought of having one's gut infected with a parasitic worm generally makes people's skin crawl. Indeed, intestinal worms, like hookworm, have a bad reputation among health experts, and have been the subject of fierce public health campaigns seeking their eradication. However, researchers have also documented the gut healing abilities of parasites like hookworm. In fact, part of how hookworms seem to work in nature is to promote an optimal gut environment in which they can thrive. In nature, the guts of people infected with hookworm are generally healthy. Could hookworms and other intestinal parasites prove key to treating and possibly eliminating diseases like celiac, and asthma? A number of clinicians and researchers feel that if they can just get the right strain of hookworm, at the right levels, they can basically eradicate celiac disease, and possibly asthma and other inflammatory diseases. When hookworms are introduced into the gut of people with celiac disease in the right amount, and kept at therapeutic levels, patients see their celiac symptoms disappear and their guts return to a healthy, normal condition. In fact, hookworms do not reproduce once inside the human gut, so if doctors put , say, 10 hookworms into a gut to treat celiac disease, there will be 10 there later, not more. In nature, the way humans build up dangerous levels of hookworm is via unsanitary environmental conditions and repeated exposure to more hookworms. Done clinically, the hookworm would present little or no danger to the human who was hosting it. While still very much in the experimental phase, researchers hope to investigate a number of strains to determine the best therapeutic levels for such disease treatments. For that, they will need FDA approval. Remember, the fecal transplant was first described in the 1950s, but took decades to catch on as a conventional treatment for gut disorders, such as c-dif bacteria, partly because it was seen as crude and somehow objectionable. But it proved to work. Really well. So much so that it's now a fairly conventional treatment. Could the hookworm follow a similar path from crude and weird to cool and effective? Could hookworms be used to cure celiac disease? Only close study will tell us for sure, and that's why the move to get FDA approval is an important one. For that, special strains of hookworm must be approved. "One of the big roadblocks is having the parasites that the FDA will allow you to infect people with," says John Hawdon, vice president of the American Society of Parasitologists and a researcher at the George Washington University. He and his colleagues are applying for permission to grow hookworm larvae to standards fit for testing in humans, which is not currently permitted in the United States. Hawdon says he anticipates a lengthy application process. Stay tuned for news on efforts to develop hookworm as a potential cure to celiac disease, asthma, and more. Sources: popsci.com iflscience.com
  5. I've had coeliac disease for 5 years now. I'm 100% gluten free apart from the occasional accidental poisioning I sometimes get at restuarants. I've had two chemical pregnancies so far, 1 unplanned in 2014 and one planned this past month. My husband and I are trying to conceive. I can get pregnant anytime I try, but within 1-2 weeks they disappear. I'm seeing a specialist next week who reckons the auto-immune disease is forcing my body to kill of anything new that enters it... hence the recurrent failed pregnancies. I'm getting tests to confirm his suspicions, but he said there s treatment like a concoction of aspirin/heparin and IVGi's etc etc. I already take prescribed folic and prenatal vitamins etc. My question is... has anybody experienced this and have gone on to have successful pregnancies with or without the help of this medication? As I've only started trying for real, I'm very anxious that this journey is going to be one of heartache, so please share any success stories if you can! thank you in advanced Louise xx
  6. Celiac.com 02/17/2017 - In recent tests, researchers found that microwave treatment (MWT) of wet wheat kernels caused a striking reduction in R5-antibody-based ELISA gluten readings, reducing the readings to under 20 ppm, so that wheat could theoretically be labeled as gluten-free. However, the actual gluten content of the wheat remained unchanged. Just the test reading changed. The research team included C Gianfrani, G Mamone, B la Gatta, A Camarca, L Di Stasio, F Maurano, S Picascia, V Capozzi, G Perna, G Picariello, A Di Luccia. They are variously affiliated with the Institute of Protein Biochemistry, CNR, Naples, Italy, the Institute of Food Sciences, CNR Avellino, Italy, the Department of the Sciences of Agriculture, Food and Environment at the University of Foggia, Italy, the Institute of Food Sciences, CNR Avellino, Italy; Department of Agriculture, University of Naples, Portici (Na), Italy, the Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Foggia, Foggia (Italy) and National Institute of Nuclear Physics, Section of Bari, Italy, and the Department of the Sciences of Agriculture, Food and Environment, University of Foggia, Italy. The failure of R5 Elisa to register gluten in MWT stands in stark contrast to analysis of gluten peptides by G12 antibody-based ELISA, mass spectrometry-based proteomics, and in vitro assay with T cells of celiac subjects, all three of which gave consistent results both before and after MWT. As to what caused the R5 Elisa to misread the MWT samples, an SDS-PAGE analysis and Raman spectroscopy showed that MWT reduced the alcohol solubility of gliadins, and altered the access of R5-antibody to the gluten epitopes. Thus, MWT neither destroys gluten nor modifies chemically the toxic epitopes, this contradicts claims that MWT of wheat kernels detoxifies gluten. This study provides evidence that R5-antibody ELISA alone is not effective to determine gluten levels in thermally treated wheat products. Gluten epitopes in processed wheat should be monitored using strategies based on combined immunoassays with T cells from celiacs, G12-antibody ELISA after proteolysis and proper molecular characterization. Source: Food Chem Toxicol. 2017 Jan 12;101:105-113. doi: 10.1016/j.fct.2017.01.010.
  7. Celiac.com 04/10/2015 - Of course, a strict gluten free diet is still the only safe and effective treatment for celiac disease. However, new drugs in development, some of which are currently being tested on humans, might allow people with celiac disease to safely eat gluten again, at least in small amounts. To be fair, even if all goes smoothly, it will be a few years at least before we see such treatments on the market. Moreover, even though many early results have been encouraging, none have yet entered safety trials, the final step before Food and Drug Administration approval and commercial availability. Drugs currently under trial include an enzyme that splits the protein in wheat that triggers adverse reactions, into smaller harmless products, and another which promises to make the gut less leaky, and thus block potentially toxic substances from triggering inflammation. There are several other drugs in earlier stages of development aimed at suppressing the immune response to gluten and preventing intestinal inflammation: ALV003, which will protect people with celiac disease against gut damage from small amounts of gluten. BL-7010 is a novel co-polymer for the treatment of celiac disease, which significantly reduces the immune response triggered by gluten. ImmusanT’s therapeutic vaccine Nexvax2 combines three proprietary peptides that elicit an immune response in celiac disease patients who carry the immune recognition gene HLA-DQ2. Larazotide acetate (AT-1001) is Alba Therapeutics Corporation’s investigational product, a first-in-class tight junction regulator, intended for the treatment of patients with celiac disease. AVX176, from Avaxia Biologics, is an investigational oral antibody drug that is the subject of U.S. composition of matter patent 8,071,101, “Antibody Therapy for Treatment of Diseases Associated with Gluten Intolerance.” The patent, which expires on May 27 2029, provides broad coverage for treating celiac disease using orally administered antibodies produced by Avaxia’s proprietary platform technology [32]. ActoGenX is carrying out discovery research in celiac disease with its range of ActoBiotics™, which use Lactococcus lactis as an expression system to locally secrete bio-therapeutics such as cytokines, antibodies, hormones, etc. Chemocentryx’s CCR9, is also known as Traficet-EN, or CCX282B), and was originally intended for patients with moderate-to-severe Crohn’s disease. It has completed one Phase 2 trial in 67 patients with celiac disease. Meanwhile, in Europe, Dr. Falk Pharma and Zedira recently announced the start of phase I clinical trials for the drug candidate ZED1227, a direct acting inhibitor of tissue transglutaminase. The small molecule targets the dysregulated transglutaminase within the small intestine in order to dampen the immune response to gluten which drives the disease process. Some of these drugs may be taken right before eating gluten, while others might be more effective when taken on a regular schedule. If approved for use as intended, these drugs will likely allow people with celiac disease to eat gluten in small amounts. To my knowledge, there is no drug in current trial phases that is designed to permit unrestricted gluten consumption. So, the good news is that the next few years may see commercially available treatments that might actual help people manage celiac disease. The downside for people with celiac disease, at least for now, is that there is no treatment on the horizon that will allow safe, unlimited gluten-consumption. Moreover, there is no hint that a cure is coming anytime soon. Still, it’s good to know that researchers are working on providing helpful tools for treating celiac disease. Are you looking forward to seeing new treatment options for celiac disease? What kind of benefits should such treatments offer? Source: Gastroenterology Report
  8. Celiac.com 10/09/2015 - For each the past three years, the FDA has sponsored a public workshop focusing on end points and clinical outcomes for drug development in GI diseases. The program is known as the Gastroenterology Regulatory Endpoints and the Advancement of Therapeutics, or by the acronym: GREAT. This year, GREAT 3, celiac disease was the focus. Experts addressed topics that included difficulties in assembling an appropriate target population for pharmacologic therapy, defining and measuring efficacy in clinical celiac disease trials, and the timing of assessment end points. One of the key points made during the conference concerned the special challenges for kids with celiac disease, including lower rates of compliance with a gluten-free diet. Alessio Fasano, MD, director of the Center for Celiac Research at MassGeneral Hospital for Children, in Boston, said that the data shows that only about 1 in 3 of adults with celiac disease are compliant with a gluten-free diet, with lower compliance in children. Because of this, he notes, "there is an even stronger need for pharmacologic therapies than in the pediatric population than in the adult population." Kids want to "fit in," says Dr. Fassano, and so providing "a pharmacologic safety net for children who want to attend a birthday party or sleepover, so that they do not have to worry about what they eat, could make a huge difference in their lives." College students are another high-risk group for noncompliance, and many campus cafeterias still struggle to provide safe gluten-free diets. He noted that although repeated endoscopies are recommended for monitoring celiac disease in adults, they are not advised in children. Overall, it seems that children and young people might be the main beneficiaries of drug treatments for celiac disease, though anyone with high sensitivity and a risk of gluten contamination would also likely benefit form such therapies. As a whole, the group in attendance seemed to be in agreement that, while much work remains to advance the treatment of celiac disease, researchers "know more about this inflammatory disease than virtually any other disease in the immune category. We should be able to come up with alternatives to a gluten-free diet." What do you think? Would you welcome an alternative to a gluten-free diet for your celiac disease? Read more at: Gastrendonews.com
  9. Celiac.com 05/14/2014 - A team of Canadian researchers have discovered a key molecule that could lead to new treatments for celiac disease. The molecule, called elafin, protects the lining of the intestine, says Elena Verdu, associate professor of medicine, and head of the McMaster University research team. When people with celiac disease consume gluten, tiny proteins called gliadins cross the intestinal lining and cause inflammation. There are also other proteins in wheat grain that may contribute to the common complaint of abdominal pain, such as ATIs which help grains be resistant to pests. Low levels of elafin in the intestinal lining can increase inflammation. According to Verdu, treatment with elafin could strengthen the intestinal lining, protect it from accidental gluten ingestion or contamination, and help to speed recovery. The Canadian Institute of Health Research is providing $400,000 over four years to fund the research. Stay tuned for more reporting on their efforts. Source: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/hamilton/news/mcmaster-researchers-find-possible-treatment-for-celiac-disease-1.2593106
  10. Celiac.com 10/17/2013 - A gluten-free diet is till the only treatment for celiac disease, but a number of companies are working on pharmaceutical treatments. However, very little information exists bout the level of interest among patients in using a medication to treat celiac disease. A research team set out to assess interest levels among patients in medical treatments for celiac disease. The research team included Christina A. Tennyson, Suzanne Simpson, Benjamin Lebwohl, Suzanne Lewis and Peter H. R. Green. For their study, the researchers submitted a questionnaire to celiac disease patients and collected data on demographics, presentation, and interest in medication. The questionnaire included three validated celiac disease-specific instruments: Celiac Disease Associated Quality of Life, the Celiac Symptom Index, and the Celiac Dietary Adherence Test. The team received 365 responses from people with biopsy-proven celiac disease. A total of 276 women and 170 men over 50 years of age responded to the study. Of these respondents, 154 experienced classic, diarrhea predominant celiac disease. In all 339 people responded to the question asking if they were interested in using a medication to treat celiac disease, 66% of whom indicated that they were interested. The questionnaire responses broke down as follows: Older people showed the greatest interest, with 71% of people over 50 years of age saying they were interested, compared with 60% of people under 50 years of age, (p = 0.0415). More men (78%) than women (62%) women were interested (p = 0.0083). People who ate out frequently (76%) showed a greater interest than those who did not (58%), p = 0.0006). People dissatisfied with their weight showed greater interest (73%) than those satisfied with their weight (51%), (p = 0.0003) Lastly, those concerned with gluten-free diet costs (77%) showed greater interest than those not concerned about gluten-free diet costs (64%), (p = 0.0176). Interestingly, the list of factors that did not seem to influence interest included length of time since diagnosis, education, presentation, and symptoms with gluten exposure. Overall, celiacs with lower quality of life scores showed a higher interest in medication (celiac disease-QOL 69.4 versus 80.1, p < 0.0001). This survey shows a fairly strong interest among people with celiac disease in non-dietary, medical treatments. Interest was highest among men, older individuals, frequent restaurant customers, individuals dissatisfied with their weight or concerned with the cost of a gluten-free diet, and those with a worse quality of life. Just how well any drugs developed to treat celiac disease might be received will likely depend on many factors, including efficacy, side-effects, cost, ease of use, etc. Source: Ther Adv Gastroenterol. 2013;6(5):358-364.
  11. Celiac.com 11/08/2012 - T-cell lymphoma is a deadly type of cancer that is more common in people with celiac disease than in the general population. Currently, there is no cure for T-cell lymphoma, and no promising treatment exists for people who suffer from this condition. However, that may be set to change, as the results of a new study suggest that new treatments for T-cell lymphoma my be on the horizon. The study appears in the journal Clinical Lymphoma Myeloma and Leukemia. The study team included J.R. Bertino, M. Lubin, N. Johnson-Farley, W.C. Chan, L. Goodell, and S. Bhagavathi. They are affiliated with the Departments of Medicine, Pharmacology, and Pathology, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ. The team was attempting to address the fact that doctors treating T-cell lymphomas, especially types of T-cell lymphoma known as peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL), angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (AITL), and anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) have limited treatment options and cannot cure the condition. Their study noted that a high percentage of PTCL, AITL, and ALCL, along with T-cell leukemia and T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia lack the enzyme methylthioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP). Their published results also note that MTAP-deficient cells cannot cleave endogenous methylthioadenosine to adenine and 5-methylthioribose-1-phosphate, a precursor of methionine, and as a result have enhanced sensitivity to inhibitors of de novo purine biosynthesis. A recently introduced antifolate, pralatrexate, which has been shown to inhibit de novo purine biosynthesis, has been approved for treatment of PTCL and may have an increasing role in therapy. An alternative strategy involving coadministration of methylthioadenosine and high-dose 6-thioguanine has been proposed and may prove to be selectively toxic to MTAP-deficient uncommon lymphomas. As a result of these MTAP results, the team suggests that new therapies and treatments for T-cell lymphoma may be possible going forward. Source: Clin Lymphoma Myeloma Leuk. 2012 Oct;12(5):306-9. doi: 10.1016/j.clml.2012.07.001.
  12. Celiac.com 07/05/2012 - As more people seek out affordable medical services in foreign countries, the variety of available medical services continues to grow. Stem cells are just the latest in the list of medical services being targeted at foreign visitors. A company called MediCAREtourism, a division of an Oman-based travel and hospitality company called Travel Point LLC, is introducing medical packages, including, stem cell treatments, to foreign travelers visiting destinations in Asia and the far east (Korea, Malaysia, and Singapore). Stem cell treatments are a type of intervention strategy that introduces new cells into damaged tissue in order to treat disease or injury. Many medical researchers believe that stem cell treatments have the potential to change the face of human disease with minimal risk of rejection and side effects. Medical researchers anticipate that adult and embryonic stem cells will soon be able to treat cancer, Type 1 diabetes mellitus, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, Celiac Disease, cardiac failure, muscle damage and neurological disorders, liver cirrhosis and most importantly spinal injuries/paralytic cases from road accidents. Stem cell treatment is one of the fastest growing medical medical services in the world today, and provides many people with tremendous benefits, says Mr. Aslam Sayed Mohamed, Manager for MediCAREtourism, said. Travel Point is teaming up with Ming Medical Services of Malaysia to offer the stem cell packages, along with free medical consultation and general health checkups for all of their passengers traveling to Thailand & Malaysia. The health checkups will be held at accredited hospitals like Paulo Memorial Hospital in Bangkok (Thailand), Prince Court Medical Centre in Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia) and Sime Darby Medical Centre Ara Damansara in Selangor (Malaysia). This means that, in addition to free medical consultation, and general health checks, Travel Point customers traveling in Asia and the Far East can choose very affordable stem cell therapy packages to Malaysia and Thailand. Commenting on the importance of these treatment options, Dr. Sean NG, Managing Director, Ming Medical Services says stem cell treatments can give "100% cure to ailments like Vitiligo, Aging, Diabetes, Diabetic Ulcers, Autism, Cosmetic Abnormalities and end stage heart diseases." In a related story for the HuffingtonPost, Anthonia Akitunde notes that what was once regarded as an option only for the rich, medical tourism is becoming more and more popular among regular people. She cites estimates by Patients Beyond Borders, which produces guidebooks on medical travel, that in 2012, 600,000 people traveled abroad for treatment -- a number anticipated to grow 15 to 20 percent annually as boomers age. Source: http://www.ameinfo.com/travel-offers-health-check-east-introduces-301973
  13. Celiac.com 12/08/2010 - A team of researchers recently compiled an overview of prevention measures and exploratory pharmacological treatments of celiac disease. Maud Pinier, Gregor Fuhrmann, Elena Verdu and Jean-Christophe Leroux comprised the research team. First, a bit of background. Human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) is the name scientists give to the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in humans. HLAs are host to a group of genes that influence human immune system function. The HLA group of genes on chromosome 6 encodes cell-surface antigen-presenting proteins, along with numerous other genes. The proteins encoded by certain genes are also known as antigens. The major HLA antigens are key components of immune function. HLA DP,DM, DOA,DOB,DQ, and DR present antigens from outside of the cell to T-lymphocytes. Celiac disease is common worldwide, and 90–95% of people with celiac disease exhibit HLA-DQ2 molecules and the rest exhibit HLA-DQ8. Celiac disease affects about 1 in 100 individuals in the general population, but recent studies show a substantial increase in American and Finnish populations in the recent years. This rise in celiac disease rates cannot be explained by better screening methods, and other factors have been suggested including environmental factors such as breast-feeding, time of gluten introduction, and infections. Celiac disease patients can present a wide variety of pathological and clinical symptoms, ranging from severe to subtle, and the clinical expression is not always indicated by the presence of intestinal atrophy. Classic celiac symptoms include diarrhea, abdominal bloating, and discomfort. However, numerous people with celiac disease go undiagnosed because their symptoms are not apparent, as in cases of silent celiac disease, or because their symptoms are atypical. Complications of celiac disease include refractory celiac disease, a rare, but complex disorder with severe and recurrent symptoms, in which patients remain unresponsive after at least 6 months on a strict gluten-free diet. It's rare for patients with non-responsive celiac disease to develop enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma, a complication of celiac disease that requires drug-based therapies. Only about 0.5–1/1.000.000 celiac patients develop this rare disorder. Other autoimmune disorders, such as autoimmune thyroiditis and type 1 diabetes, are also more common in people with celiac disease. Among siblings of children with type I diabetes, rates of celiac disease have been shown to correlate with the prevalence of celiac disease-associated HLA-DQB1 alleles. Moreover, the risk of celiac disease is significantly higher in children with type 1 diabetes who also carry the HLA-DQB1*02–DQA1*05 genotype. A recent genotyping study comparing 8,064 people with type 1 diabetes with 9,339 control subjects showed that patients with type 1 diabetes and celiac disease share seven common alleles that regulate autoimmune responses. Recent data also confirm an elevated risk of mortality in individuals with mild gluten-induced inflammation who show no villous atrophy. The team concludes by noting that, due to the high prevalence of celiac disease, and its rising numbers, early prevention may represent a cost-effective strategy. Source: The American Journal of Gastroenterology , (28 September 2010) | doi:10.1038/ajg.2010.372
  14. Celiac.com 03/16/2010 - Enteropathy associated T-cell lymphoma (EATL) is a rare type of peripheral T-cell lymphoma that is commonly associated with celiac disease. A group at The Newcastle Lymphoma Group in the United Kingdom, evaluated data from newly diagnosed patients in Northern England and Scotland between 1994 and 1998, in search of increased overall survival (OS) rates and progression free survival (PFS) rates for EATL patients. Celiac disease (celiac disease) is the most common food intolerance disorder affecting Western civilization today. While most celiacs show an improvement in their health after initiating a gluten free diet, 2-5% of patients do not improve, and are thus considered to have refractory celiac disease (RCD). RCD is further classified into two categories, Type 1 with intraepithelial lymphocytes of normal phenotype, or as type 2 with clonal expansion of intraepithelial lymphocytes with an aberrant phenotype. Type 2 patients are expected to have a five year overall survival rate (OS) of 50%-58%, and most Type 2 RCD patients die from EATL. EATL generally affects older patients in their 60's or 70's, with a history of celiac disease or RCD, and is most frequently presented in the form of malabsorption along with abdominal pain. However, EATL is not exclusive to patients with celiac disease or RCD and has also been found in patients without a history of either. Standard treatments until now have included surgical resection, with or without anthracycline-based chemotherapy, or high-dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT). Results of these treatments have been dismal, with the patient typically dying from disease related complications. Using a population-based setting, 26 EATL patients that qualified for intensive treatment were given the new aggressive treatment of, ifosfamide, vincristine, etoposide / methotrexate (IVE/MTX) & ASCT, and their results were compared to that of the historical group. Statistically there was no difference between the groups; all groups had similar age, sex and features at initial evaluation. For all patients treated with the historical cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone (CHOP) therapy, the average PFS rate was approximately three months, and the average OS rate was about seven months. However, the IVE/MTX - ASCT group showed a significantly higher five year PFS and OS compared to patients treated with the historical CHOP therapy. Additionally, patients treated with IVE/MTX - ASCT showed improvement in their remission rates, and had profound reduction of death rates compared to the group treated with the historical CHOP chemotherapy. Of the patients that were solely treated with surgery, none survived. While EATL has a somber outcome for most patients treated with conventional CHOP treatments, data collected from these tests reveal that the regime IVE/MTX – ASCT shows exceptional promise as a new treatment. It is recommended that EATL patients enter themselves into national studies like this one, to expand research data and to help explore potentially effective EATL treatment options. Source: DOI 10.1182/blood-2009-07-231324.
×