Jump to content
Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease Read more... ×
  • Sign Up

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'type 1'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Diagnosis & Recovery, Related Disorders & Research
    • Calendar of Events
    • Celiac Disease Pre-Diagnosis, Testing & Symptoms
    • Post Diagnosis, Recovery & Treatment of Celiac Disease
    • Related Disorders & Celiac Research
    • Dermatitis Herpetiformis
    • Gluten Sensitivity and Behavior
  • Support & Help
    • Coping with Celiac Disease
    • Parents' Corner
    • Gab/Chat Room
    • Doctors Treating Celiac Disease
    • Teenagers & Young Adults Only
    • Pregnancy
    • Friends and Loved Ones of Celiacs
    • Meeting Room
    • Celiac Disease & Sleep
    • Celiac Support Groups
  • Gluten-Free Lifestyle
    • Gluten-Free Foods, Products, Shopping & Medications
    • Gluten-Free Recipes & Cooking Tips
    • Gluten-Free Restaurants
    • Ingredients & Food Labeling Issues
    • Publications & Publicity
    • Traveling with Celiac Disease
    • Weight Issues & Celiac Disease
    • International Room (Outside USA)
    • Sports and Fitness
  • When A Gluten-Free Diet Just Isn't Enough
    • Food Intolerance & Leaky Gut
    • Super Sensitive People
    • Alternative Diets
  • Forum Technical Assistance
    • Board/Forum Technical Help
  • DFW/Central Texas Celiacs's Events
  • DFW/Central Texas Celiacs's Groups/Organizations in the DFW area

Blogs

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.

Categories

  • Celiac.com Sponsors
  • Celiac Disease
  • Safe Gluten-Free Food List / Unsafe Foods & Ingredients
  • Gluten-Free Food & Product Reviews
  • Gluten-Free Recipes
    • American & International Foods
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Biscuits, Rolls & Buns
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Noodles & Dumplings
    • Gluten-Free Dessert Recipes: Pastries, Cakes, Cookies, etc.
    • Gluten-Free Bread Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Flour Mixes
    • Gluten-Free Kids Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Snacks & Appetizers
    • Gluten-Free Muffin Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Pancake Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Pizza Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Soups, Sauces, Dressings & Chowders
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Cooking Tips
    • Gluten-Free Scone Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Waffle Recipes
  • Celiac Disease Diagnosis, Testing & Treatment
  • Miscellaneous Information on Celiac Disease
    • Additional Celiac Disease Concerns
    • Celiac Disease Research Projects, Fundraising, Epidemiology, Etc.
    • Conferences, Publicity, Pregnancy, Church, Bread Machines, Distillation & Beer
    • Gluten-Free Diet, Celiac Disease & Codex Alimentarius Wheat Starch
    • Gluten-Free Food Ingredient Labeling Regulations
    • Celiac.com Podcast Edition
  • Celiac Disease & Gluten Intolerance Research
  • Celiac Disease & Related Diseases and Disorders
    • Lists of Diseases and Disorders Associated with Celiac Disease
    • Addison's Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Anemia and Celiac Disease
    • Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia and Celiac Disease
    • Arthritis and Celiac Disease
    • Asthma and Celiac Disease
    • Ataxia, Nerve Disease, Neuropathy, Brain Damage and Celiac Disease
    • Attention Deficit Disorder and Celiac Disease
    • Autism and Celiac Disease
    • Bacterial Overgrowth and Celiac Disease
    • Cancer, Lymphoma and Celiac Disease
    • Candida Albicans and Celiac Disease
    • Canker Sores (Aphthous Stomatitis) & Celiac Disease
    • Casein / Cows Milk Intolerance and Celiac Disease
    • Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Celiac Disease
    • Cognitive Impairment and Celiac Disease
    • Crohn's Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Depression and Celiac Disease
    • Dermatitis Herpetiformis: Skin Condition Associated with Celiac Disease
    • Diabetes and Celiac Disease
    • Down Syndrome and Celiac Disease
    • Dyspepsia, Acid Reflux and Celiac Disease
    • Epilepsy and Celiac Disease
    • Eye Problems, Cataract and Celiac Disease
    • Fertility, Pregnancy, Miscarriage and Celiac Disease
    • Fibromyalgia and Celiac Disease
    • Flatulence (Gas) and Celiac Disease
    • Gall Bladder Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Gastrointestinal Bleeding and Celiac Disease
    • Geographic Tongue (Glossitis) and Celiac Disease
    • Growth Hormone Deficiency and Celiac Disease
    • Heart Failure and Celiac Disease
    • Infertility, Impotency and Celiac Disease
    • Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Intestinal Permeability and Celiac Disease
    • Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Celiac Disease
    • Kidney Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Liver Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Lupus and Celiac Disease
    • Malnutrition, Body Mass Index and Celiac Disease
    • Migraine Headaches and Celiac Disease
    • Multiple Sclerosis and Celiac Disease
    • Myasthenia Gravis Celiac Disease
    • Obesity, Overweight & Celiac Disease
    • Osteoporosis, Osteomalacia, Bone Density and Celiac Disease
    • Psoriasis and Celiac Disease
    • Refractory Celiac Disease & Collagenous Sprue
    • Sarcoidosis and Celiac Disease
    • Scleroderma and Celiac Disease
    • Schizophrenia / Mental Problems and Celiac Disease
    • Sepsis and Celiac Disease
    • Sjogrens Syndrome and Celiac Disease
    • Skin Problems and Celiac Disease
    • Sleep Disorders and Celiac Disease
    • Thrombocytopenic Purpura and Celiac Disease
    • Thyroid & Pancreatic Disorders and Celiac Disease
    • Tuberculosis and Celiac Disease
  • The Origins of Celiac Disease
  • Gluten-Free Grains and Flours
  • Oats and Celiac Disease: Are They Gluten-Free?
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity
    • Winter 2019 Issue
    • Autumn 2018 Issue
    • Summer 2018 Issue
    • Spring 2018 Issue
    • Winter 2018 Issue
    • Autumn 2017 Issue
    • Summer 2017 Issue
    • Spring 2017 Issue
    • Winter 2017 Issue
    • Autumn 2016 Issue
    • Summer 2016 Issue
    • Spring 2016 Issue
    • Winter 2016 Issue
    • Autumn 2015 Issue
    • Summer 2015 Issue
    • Spring 2015 Issue
    • Winter 2015 Issue
    • Autumn 2014 Issue
    • Summer 2014 Issue
    • Spring 2014 Issue
    • Winter 2014 Issue
    • Autumn 2013 Issue
    • Summer 2013 Issue
    • Spring 2013 Issue
    • Winter 2013 Issue
    • Autumn 2012 Issue
    • Summer 2012 Issue
    • Spring 2012 Issue
    • Winter 2012 Issue
    • Autumn 2011 Issue
    • Summer 2011 Issue
    • Spring 2006 Issue
    • Summer 2005 Issue
  • Celiac Disease Support Groups
    • United States of America: Celiac Disease Support Groups and Organizations
    • Outside the USA: Celiac Disease Support Groups and Contacts
  • Celiac Disease Doctor Listing
  • Kids and Celiac Disease
  • Gluten-Free Travel
  • Gluten-Free Cooking
  • Gluten-Free
  • Allergy vs. Intolerance
  • Tax Deductions for Gluten-Free Food
  • Gluten-Free Newsletters & Magazines
  • Gluten-Free & Celiac Disease Links
  • History of Celiac.com
    • History of Celiac.com Updates Through October 2007
    • Your E-mail in Support of Celiac.com 1996 to 2006

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Interests


Location

Found 8 results

  1. Celiac.com 12/20/2018 - Patients with monoglandular and/or polyglandular autoimmunity, and their relatives, have higher rates of celiac disease than those without such autoimmunity. Somewhere between 10 and 30% of patients with celiac disease test positive for thyroid and/or type 1 diabetes antibodies, while around 5 to 7% of patients with autoimmune thyroid disease and/or type 1 diabetes test positive for IgA anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies. A team of researchers recently set out to examine the relationship between celiac disease and endocrine autoimmunity. The research team included George J. Kahalya, Lara Frommera, and Detlef Schuppan. They are variously affiliated with the Department of Medicine I, Johannes Gutenberg University (JGU) Medical Center, Mainz, Germany, the Institute for Translational Immunology and Research Center for Immunotherapy (FZI), Johannes Gutenberg University (JGU) Medical Center, Mainz, Germany, and the Division of Gastroenterology and the Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States. Celiac disease and endocrine autoimmunity do share a common genetic background, which definitely explains some of the relationship. The main common denominators are HLA antigens DQ2 (DQA1*0501-DQB1*0201) and/or DQ8 (DQA1*0301-DQB1*0302), that are tightly linked to DR3 and DR4, respectively. Researchers have identified functional single nucleotide polymorphisms of various genes involved in immune regulation as susceptibility genes for both celiac disease and monoglandular or polyglandular autoimmunity. This is a promising hypothesis, but exactly how the effects of a gluten-free diet might prevent or ameliorate glandular autoimmunity remains unclear. Based on their results, the research team does recommend that all patients with celiac disease be tested for type 1 diabetes and/or autoimmune thyroid disease. They also recommend that patients with the above autoimmune endocrine disorders be checked for celiac disease. Read more at: Sciencedirect.com https://doi.org/10.1016/j.autrev.2018.05.013
  2. Has there been any research showing a gluten free diet helps a newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes patient? I have celiac disease and my son was just diagnosed with Type 1.
  3. A new study was released this week. Although not a true scientific study, the results are promising for Type 1 diabetics and in my personal opinion, Type 2, as well. I am sharing this because Type 1 has a strong affiliation with celiac disease. Of course, more studies are needed. Unfortunately, as you all know, food treatment for an illness is not well funded as there is little money to be made (e.g. pharmacutical companies). I have Type 2 diabetes (thin and athletic) and have managed to avoid insulin or drugs on a low carb diet for the past four years. Managed meaning, maintaining near or normal blood sugars. Personally, perhaps all of us should focus on a lower carb diet with fewer non-processed foods. It may slow down our obesity crisis and all the health issues that typically follow. https://www.nytimes.com/2018/05/07/well/live/low-carb-diet-type-1-diabetes.html Google more. Do not trust just my word. Keep advocating for your health!
  4. Celiac.com 02/28/2018 - In an effort to discover more genes that trigger type 1 diabetes, a team of researchers recently conducted a large, prospective study of children at risk for type 1 diabetes. The end goal is to reveal more targets for treating or even preventing the disease. The research team included A Sharma, X Liu, D Hadley, W Hagopian, WM Chen, S Onengut-Gumuscu, C Törn, AK Steck, BI Frohnert, M Rewers, AG Ziegler, Å Lernmark, J Toppari, JP Krischer, B Akolkar, SS Rich, JX She; and TEDDY Study Group. The team identified six new chromosomal regions in young people who have already developed type 1 diabetes, or who have started making antibodies against their insulin-producing cells, often a step toward full-blown diabetes that requires lifelong insulin therapy. Their analysis of 5,806 individuals, which is published in the Journal of Autoimmunity, also confirms three regions already associated with one of those related conditions. The team observed two top autoantibodies. The first, called IAA, acts directly against insulin. The second, called GADA, acts against the enzyme glutamate decarboxylase, which regulates the insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. According to Dr. She, about 90 percent of patients with type 1 diabetes start with one of the autoantibodies, and many patients eventually end up with both. The second autoantibody may surface in a few days or even years later. They began this study with 176,586 SNPs, or single nucleotide polymorphisms. Nucleotides are basic building blocks of our genetic information. According to Sharma, the SNPs evaluated by TEDDY scientists were already linked with other autoimmune conditions like rheumatoid arthritis or celiac disease, but not type 1 diabetes. The researchers figured out which of these SNPs are different in TEDDY participants with type 1 diabetes versus those with Islet cell autoantibodies versus those with neither. Previous research has shown that the genes associated with IA and actual type 1 diabetes can differ. Dr. She says that even though clinicians regard Islet cell autoantibodies (IA) as a red flag for type 1 diabetes, not every child with IA goes on to develop diabetes, though multiple autoantibodies definitely increase that risk. The team notes that it is possible that the genes that promote IA development may differ from those that lead to full-blown disease progression. She says that this is the first study of gene identification for any disease to use this sort of longitudinal information. She add that this and other studies by the TEDDY research group help to clarify the search for important non-HLA genes by adding the "time to disease" perspective. Source: J Autoimmun. 2018 Jan 5. pii: S0896-8411(17)30739-4. doi: 10.1016/j.jaut.2017.12.008. The researchers are variously affiliated with the Center for Biotechnology and Genomic Medicine, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta University, Augusta, GA, USA; Division of Biostatistics and Data Science, Department of Population Health Sciences, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta University, Augusta, GA, US; the Health Informatics Institute, Morsani College of Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA; the Division of Population Health Sciences and Education, St George's University of London, London, United Kingdom; the Pacific Northwest Research Institute, Seattle, WA, USA; the Center for Public Health Genomics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA; the Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University/CRC, Malmö, Sweden; the Barbara Davis Center for Childhood Diabetes, University of Colorado, Denver, Aurora, CO, USA; the Institute of Diabetes Research, Helmholtz Zentrum München, Munich-Neuherberg, Germany; Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich-Neuherberg, Germany; Forschergruppe Diabetes e.V., Munich-Neuherberg, Germany; the Department of Pediatrics, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland; the National Institutes of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Disorders, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA; and the Center for Biotechnology and Genomic Medicine, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta University, Augusta, GA, USA.
  5. Dr. Vikki Petersen D.C, C.C.N

    A Gluten-Free Diet Helps Type 1 Diabetes

    Celiac.com 10/27/2017 - It has long been understood that two autoimmune diseases, celiac disease and type 1 diabetes are related. They share common genes and the incidence of celiac disease is higher among type 1 diabetics. There have been some anecdotal reports regarding children diagnosed with type 1 diabetes who were put on a gluten-free diet soon after their diagnosis and for a period of two years or more didn't require any insulin. The thought was that the gluten-free diet effectively halted the progression of the diabetes, at least for the duration of the study. Studies of mice have shown that despite utilizing a genetic strain of mice that were strongly in-bred to increase the risk of type 1 diabetes, 2/3 of them did not do so when a drug was administered to prevent leaky gut. This study was performed by Dr. Alessio Fasano at the University of Maryland Celiac Research Center. Dr. Fasano is one of the world's acclaimed researchers in the area of celiac disease and gluten sensitivity. Leaky gut is associated with the initiation and continuation of autoimmune disease and Dr. Fasano's work with these genetically predisposed mice shed a great deal of light on the power of an undamaged gut lining to effectively forestall development of a genetic condition, in this case type 1 diabetes. A recent study out of Immunology, dated August 22, 2012, is titled "Dietary gluten alters the balance of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines in T cells of BALB/c mice". The title is a mouthful but here is what the researchers out of Denmark found: Their initial premise was based on the idea, as I mentioned above, that dietary modifications, specifically a gluten-free diet, could reduce the risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The question they posed was, "How did this occur?" They discovered that wheat gluten induced the production of pro-inflammatory chemicals called cytokines that would damage the intestinal lining and immune tissues of the small intestine. More importantly, a gluten-free diet didn't just neutralize the negative effects just mentioned, but it actually caused the production of anti-inflammatory chemicals that would provide protection for the immune system and gut. So, while gluten is a known bad guy, a gluten-free diet doesn't just take the negative away, it actually induces a positive, healing response. Clinically we frequently see this with patients. As soon as we meet a patient with any history of autoimmune disease, we quickly test them for celiac disease and gluten sensitivity via lab tests and a 30 day elimination diet. If we discover any negative immune reaction to gluten, we begin a strict gluten-free diet. Happily, we often see stabilization, if not reversal, of their autoimmune disease. We support the gluten-free diet with our other protocols for normalizing gut permeability (healing a leaky gut) and strengthening the immune system. Taken together this program yields excellent results. If you know anyone suffering from an autoimmune disease, please show them this article. Gluten could be a component in furthering their disease and a gluten-free diet could be a positive influence in their journey to improved health. I hope this was helpful. Please feel free to contact me should you have any questions. And if your health is not at the level you would like, I can also offer you a free health analysis. Call us at 408-761-3900. Our destination clinic treats patients from across the country and internationally and we would be delighted to help you. To your good health.
  6. Celiac.com 07/05/2017 - Numerous researchers have documented a connection between celiac disease and type 1 diabetes. One team of researchers recently set out to examine international differences in celiac disease rates and clinical characteristics of youth with coexisting type 1 diabetes and celiac disease compared with type 1 diabetes only. The research team included Maria E. Craig, Nicole Prinz, Claire T. Boyle, Fiona M. Campbell, Timothy W. Jones, Sabine E. Hofer, Jill H.Simmons, Naomi Holman, Elaine Tham, Elke Fröhlich-Reiterer, Stephanie DuBose, Helen Thornton, Bruce King, David M. Maahs, Reinhard W. Holl and Justin T. Warner. To analyze the relationship between outcomes, including HbA1c, height-standard deviation score [sDS], overweight/obesity, and type 1 diabetes with celiac disease versus type 1 diabetes alone, adjusting for sex, age, and diabetes duration, the team created multivariable linear and logistic regression models. The analysis included 52,721 people under 18 years of age with a clinic visit between April 2013 and March 2014. The team used the following data sources: the Prospective Diabetes Follow-up registry (Germany/Austria); the T1D Exchange Clinic Network (T1DX) (U.S.); the National Paediatric Diabetes Audit (U.K. [England/Wales]); and the Australasian Diabetes Data Network (ADDN) (Australia). The researchers found biopsy-confirmed celiac disease in 1,835 young people, or 3.5%. These patients were diagnosed on average at age 8.1 years, with a range of 5.3 to 11.2 years. Most young people (37%) with diabetes upon celiac disease diagnosis had it for less than one year. Eighteen percent with diabetes had it for 1-2 years at celiac diagnosis, 23% had diabetes between 3 and 5 years at celiac diagnosis, while 17% had diabetes for more than 5 years at celiac diagnosis. Celiac disease rates ranged from 1.9% in the T1DX to 7.7% in the ADDN and were higher in girls than boys (4.3% vs. 2.7%, P < 0.001). Children with coexisting celiac disease were diagnosed with diabetes at 5.4 years on average, compared with those with type 1 diabetes only, who were diagnosed at 7.0 years of age, on average. Also, fewer children with both conditions were non-white, 15 vs. 18%. Height-SDS was lower in those with celiac disease (0.36 vs. 0.48) and fewer were overweight/obese (34 vs. 37%, adjusted P < 0.001), whereas average HbA1c values were comparable: 8.3 ± 1.5% (67 ± 17 mmol/mol) versus 8.4 ± 1.6% (68 ± 17 mmol/mol). This study clearly documented that celiac disease is not uncommon in young people with type 1 diabetes. Differences in disease rates may be due to variations in screening and diagnostic practices, and/or risk levels. Although the groups showed similar glycemic control, the research team encourages close monitoring of growth and nutrition in this population, due to the lower height-SDS. Source: Diabetes Care 2017 May; dc162508. The researchers in this study are variously affiliated with the Children’s Hospital at Westmead, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Charles Perkins Centre Westmead, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Institute of Epidemiology and Medical Biometry, University of Ulm, Ulm, Germany; German Center for Diabetes Research, Munich-Neuherberg, Germany; Jaeb Center for Health Research, Tampa, FL; Leeds Children’s Hospital, Leeds, U.K.; The University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia; Telethon Kids Institute, Perth, Australia; Department of Pediatrics, Medical University of Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria; Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN; Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, U.K.; Women’s and Children’s Hospital, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia; Department of Pediatrics, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria; St. Helens and Knowsley Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, St. Helens, U.K.; John Hunter Children’s Hospital, Hunter Medical Research Institute, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, New South Wales, Australia; Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital Stanford, Stanford University Medical Center, Palo Alto, CA; and the Children's Hospital for Wales, Cardiff, U.K.
  7. Celiac.com 02/22/2017 - Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and celiac disease (celiac disease) are autoimmune diseases that share similar genetic patterns. T1DM treatment is based on diet, physical activity and insulin therapy, whereas celiac disease treatment is based on a gluten-free diet. A research team recently set out to evaluate the quality of life (QoL) of individuals with the association of T1DM and celiac disease, to characterize their nutritional status and to compare it with those with only one disease and to healthier control subjects. The research team included JG Nunes-Silva, VS Nunes, RP Schwartz, S1 Mlss Trecco, D Evazian, ML Correa-Giannella, M Nery, and MS Queiroz. The are variously affiliated with the Nutrition and Dietetics Division, Central Institute of Clinics Hospital, the Lipids Laboratory (LIM-10), Endocrinology and Metabolism Division of Hospital das Clinicas, Faculty of Medical Sciences, the Radiology Institute of Clinics Hospital, the Cellular and Molecular Endocrinology Laboratory (LIM-18), and the Endocrinology Division, Internal Medicine Department, all at the University of São Paulo Medical School, São Paulo, Brazil. The researchers evaluated sixty patients controlled by sex, age and body mass index (BMI). Patients were further divided into the following groups based on previous diagnosis: DMCD group (T1DM and celiac disease); DM group (T1DM); celiac disease group (celiac disease); or HC (healthy control subjects). They used the SF-36 questionnaire to assess psychological well-being, and compared the results with glycemic control, presence of complications related to diabetes, and adhesion to gluten-free diet (GFD). Using BMI, waist circumference, bio-impedance, general laboratory tests and whole-body densitometry, they determined nutritional status and body mass composition. Both the DMCD and DM groups had similar times of diagnosis, but the duration of celiac disease was significantly higher in the celiac disease group compared with DMCD. The SF-36 analysis revealed statistically significant differences between DM and HC groups in two domains: general health (P=0.042) and energy/vitality (P=0.012). QoL was also correlated with compliance to a GFD, and scores were similar in both groups: DMCD and celiac disease. Forty percent of individuals in the celiac disease group had visceral fat area above 100 cm2, compared with just 20% in the other groups. So, are people with both Type 1 diabetes and celiac disease automatically doomed to worse health? It seems not. To be sure, they are generally less healthy than control subjects, but the study found that the DMCD group had similar scores to DM, celiac disease and HC on QoL, as well as on their nutritional status and bone metabolism. The researchers conclude from this that the association of T1DM and celiac disease did not deteriorate the health status of the individuals with both Type 1 diabetes and celiac disease. So, it seems that having both Type 1 diabetes and celiac disease dose not automatically mean having worse health, nutrition and well-being. Source: Nutr Diabetes. 2017 Jan 9;7(1):e239. doi: 10.1038/nutd.2016.43.
  8. Celiac.com 02/01/2017 - More and more evidence shows a connection between gut inflammation and type 1 diabetes (T1D). A team of researchers recently set out to assess gut inflammatory profiles and microbiota in patients with T1D, and to compare them with healthy controls (CTRL) and with celiac disease patients as gut inflammatory disease controls. The research team included Silvia Pellegrini, Valeria Sordi, Andrea Mario Bolla, Diego Saita Roberto Ferrarese, Filippo Canducci, Massimo Clementi, Francesca Invernizzi, Alberto Mariani, Riccardo Bonfanti, Graziano Barera, Pier Alberto Testoni, Claudio Doglioni, Emanuele Bosi, and Lorenzo Piemonti. They are affiliated with the Diabetes Research Institute at the IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute in Milan, Italy. The team evaluated inflammatory status and microbiome composition in biopsies of the duodenal mucosa from 19 patients with T1D, 19 with celiac disease, and 16 healthy control subjects, recruited at San Raffaele Scientific Institute, in Milan, Italy, between 2009 and 2015. They assessed inflammation by gene expression study and immunohistochemistry and used 16S rRNA gene sequencing to analyze microbiome composition. Compared to CTRL and celiac disease patients, the team found an increased expression of CCL13, CCL19, CCL22, CCR2, COX2, IL4R, CD68, PTX3, TNFα and VEGFA genes in T1D patients. The immunohistochemical analysis confirmed T1D specific inflammatory status was mainly marked by increased monocyte/macrophage lineage infiltration, compared to healthy and celiac disease control tissues. The T1D duodenal mucosal microbiome also proved to be different from the control groups. This was mainly marked by increased Firmicutes, and Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio and a reduction in Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes. The expression of genes specific for T1D inflammation was associated with the excess of specific bacteria in duodenum. This study shows that patients with T1D show specific abnormalities in gut inflammation and microbiota. Greater knowledge of the complex pathogenesis of T1D will likely provide new directions for therapies targeting the gut. Look for more studies in this area in the near future, as scientists look to nail down specific treatments to prevent gut inflammation. Source: The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1210/jc.2016-3222
×