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Found 16 results

  1. Celiac.com 06/15/2015 - It's well-documented that people with active celiac disease are more likely to have osteoporosis and increased risk of fractures. High-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) allows for three-dimensional exploration of bone micro-architecture, including measurement of cortical and trabecular compartments, and providing detailed information on bone disease pathophysiology and fracture. Using HR-pQCT, research team recently set out to assess the volumetric and micro-architectural characteristics of peripheral bones. that is the distal radius and tibia, in adult pre-menopausal women with active freshly diagnosed celiac disease. The research team included María Belén Zanchetta, Florencia Costa, Vanesa Longobardi, Gabriela Longarini, Roberto Martín Mazure, María Laura Moreno, Horacio Vázquez, Fernando Silveira, Sonia Niveloni, Edgardo Smecuol, María de la Paz Temprano, Hui Jer Hwang, Andrea González, Eduardo César Mauriño, Cesar Bogado, Jose R. Zanchetta, an dJulio César Bai. They are variously affiliated with the IDIM, Instituto de Diagnóstico e Investigaciones Metabólicas, and with the Cátedra de Osteología y Metabolismo Mineral, Universidad del Salvador, Buenos Aires, Argentina. For the study, their team prospectively enrolled 31 consecutive premenopausal women with newly diagnosed celiac disease (median age 29 years, range: 18–49) and 22 healthy women of similar age (median age 30 years, range 21–41) and body mass index. Using HR-pQCT, the team was able to successfully identify significant deterioration in the micro-architecture of trabecular and cortical compartments of peripheral bones. HR-pQCT revealed that most bone micro-architecture parameters were substantially reduced in celiac disease patients compared to a control group. Twenty-two patients showed symptomatic celiac disease. These patients had a greater bone micro-architectural deficit than those with sub-clinical celiac disease. Impaired bone micro-architecture could be one cause of diminished bone strength and higher risk of fractures seen in many celiac patients. The researchers are looking to conduct a follow-up of this group of patients. They want to know whether bone micro-architecture recovers with a gluten-free diet, and, if so, how quickly and to what extent. Source: BONE July 2015, Volume 76, Pages 149–157. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bone.2015.03.005
  2. Celiac.com 10/28/2015 - A team of researchers recently set out to review the medical literature for psychological morbidity associated with celiac disease. The team included F. Zingone, G.L. Swift, T.R. Card, D.S. Sanders, J.F. Ludvigsson, and J.C. Bai. They are variously associated with the University of Salerno, Department of Medicine and Surgery in Salerno, Italy, the Department of Gastroenterology at University Hospital Llandough in Cardiff, Wales, UK, the Division of Epidemiology and Public Health at The University of Nottingham in Nottingham City Hospital, Nottingham, UK, the Department of Gastroenterology, Royal Hallamshire Hospital & the University of Sheffield, UK, the Department of Pediatrics at Örebro University Hospital in Örebro, Sweden, the Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics at Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm, Sweden, the Department of Medicine, "C. Bonorino Udaondo" Gastroenterology Hospital, Universidad del Salvador in Buenos Aires, Argentina. For their study, the team searched PubMed for all papers on psychological aspects of celiac disease, specifically quality of life, anxiety, depression and fatigue, published between 1900 and June, 2014. Their results showed that anxiety, depression and fatigue are common complaints in patients with untreated celiac disease and contribute significantly to lower quality of life. While aspects of these conditions may improve within a few months after starting a gluten-free diet, some patients continue to suffer from significant psychological morbidity. These psychological symptoms may have an impact on the quality of life and the dietary adherence for people with celiac disease. The team encourages health care professionals to keep in mind any associated psychological burdens when treating patients with celiac disease. Source: United European Gastroenterol J. 2015 Apr;3(2):136-45. doi: 10.1177/2050640614560786.
  3. Celiac.com 05/28/2009 - Dr. MariaPorpora and her fellow researchers in Italy studied a woman backin 2003 who had chronic abdominal and pelvic pain, deep dyspareunia(pain while having sex), and dysmenorrhea (menstruation pain similar tocramps). When she came in to Dr. Porpora’s clinic, she also haddiarrheaand had lost five kilograms in the last six months. Her painwas so bad that she completely avoided having sex. She measured the severity ofher pain on a one to ten scale, with one being low and ten being high: Dysmenorrhea: 10 Chronic pelvic pain: 7 Dysapareunia: 10 Shealso had a “normal cervix, a mobile, anteveted mildly enlarge uteruscaused by myomata (benign tumors), and the absence of adnexal masses(lumps in tissue near the uterus, usually in the ovary or fallopiantube).” The doctors werejustifiably confused, and even performed surgery tohelp relieve the pain, however, after six months her symptoms returned. She wasonly partially responsive to their “analgesic, antispasmodic, andantidepressant” drugs. She had no obvious gynecologic disorder. During subsequent examinations the doctors discovered an issue related to malabsorption, and the patient was tested forgluten antibodies. The results were positive, and the woman was put on a gluten-free diet. After one year on a gluten freediet the woman’s pain disappeared, along with her other symptoms offatigue, depression, and general intestinal issues. Accordingto this article, 40% of cases of pelvic pain in women have no known cause, even if they have been diagnosed with irritable bowelsyndrome or inflammatory bowel diseases. According to the doctors: “Celiac disease should betaken into consideration when a patient presents with unexplainedpelvic pain, dysmenorrhea, or deep dyspareunia if these symptoms areassociated with bowel disorders, even in the absence of a knownintestinal disease.” Reference: Obstetrics and gynecology 2002;99(5 Pt 2):937-9.
  4. Authors: Mautalen, Carlos, M.D. et al. Source: The American Journal of Gastroenterology, February, 1997, p. 313-318. In evaluating 14 newly diagnosed adult celiac patients who had been on a gluten-free diet (7 consumed the diet plus calcium at 1 gm. per day and vitamin D2 at 32,000I.U. given weekly compared to 7 diet only subjects) for 12 months, gluten restriction increased overall bone mass 5% in the lumbar spine and 5% in the total skeleton. When considering the 11 patients who strictly followed the gluten-restriction, bone density increased 8.4% in the lumbar spine and 7.7% in the total skeleton. The remineralization of patients treated with diet only was similar to that of patients treated with diet and supplements.
  5. Celiac.com 08/14/2012 - One of the least talked about symptoms of celiac disease in children is a delaying of sexual maturation. Previous studies have established this effect, but they have not clearly explored whether treatment of celiac disease (via gluten-free diet) can restore sexual maturation to a normal rate. A study performed by the Indian Society of Gastroenterology suggests that treatment of the disease with life-long adherence to a gluten-free diet can prevent these symptoms from occurring. 30 adolescents (21 females and 9 males between 10 and 19 years old) with diagnosed celiac disease and on gluten-free diet for at least one year were accepted into the study. Each patient's sexual maturity was evaluated using Tanner's stages of sexual development. Patients who were at least two standard deviations above the mean age appropriate for their sexual maturity level were considered to have delayed sexual maturation. Participants and their parents provided the following information to be used in the study: family size, family income, educational status of parents, staple cereal used in family diet, age at diagnosis of celiac disease and age at start of gluten-free diet. The age at onset of celiac disease symptoms ranged from 2 to 13.5 years, and the age at diagnosis ranged from 3 to 16 years (mean ages 4.6 and 7 years, respectively). At the time of the study, all children had completed at least 2 years on the gluten-free diet. 16 of the 30 patients had completed 4 years. 30% of patients in the study (9 out of 30, 1 boy and 8 girls) demonstrated delayed sexual maturation. The information gathered from families (family size, income, etc.) was charted against these results, and delayed sexual maturation was shown to be associated with later initiation of gluten-free diet. These results tell us that a gluten-free diet could very well serve to prevent delayed sexual maturation symptoms from manifesting in children. The limits of the study (no age- and sex-matched control group as well as limited means of verifying diet compliance) as well as contradictory findings from a previous study leave room for further investigation, but it would seem that we have yet another reason to diagnose and treat celiac children as early as possible. Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22711365
  6. Lancet 2001; 358: 356-61 Celiac.com 08/10/2001 - In line with past studies on the mortality rate of people with celiac disease, the results of a new study conducted by Dr. Giovanni Corrao (Cattedra di Statistica Medica, Università di Milano-Bicocca, 20126 Milano, Italy), et. al., indicate that the death rate among people with celiac disease is double that of the normal population. The prospective cohort study examined 1,072 adults who were diagnosed with celiac disease between 1962 and 1994, and their 3,384 first-degree relatives. The mortality rates by 1998 among both groups were compared to that of the normal population. Their findings show that 53 people in the celiac disease group died compared with the 25.9 deaths that were expected (Standardized Mortality Ratio - SMR). Unlike past studies, however, this one also looked for different patterns of clinical presentation of the disease. For example, the results indicate that within three years of diagnosis there was a significant increase in the mortality rate for those who presented symptoms of malabsorption. This same increase was not seen in those who were originally diagnosed because of minor symptoms, or via an antibody screening. The SMR also increased when there was a delay in diagnosis, and when a gluten-free diet was not followed. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma was the main cause of death, and no excess in mortality rate was seen in the groups first-degree relatives. Conclusion: Prompt diagnosis and dietary treatment will decrease the mortality rate of people with celiac disease. More studies are needed regarding asymptomatic people with celiac disease and their risk of intestinal lymphoma.
  7. Celiac.com 09/29/2011 - Results of various studies comparing mortality in undetected celiac disease compared with the general population have been contradictory. Some studies have suggested a fourfold increase in mortality compared with the general population, while others have found no increase at all. A research team set out to clarify the matter by crafting a cohort study of Cambridge doctors that would establish all-cause and cause-specific mortality in undiagnosed celiac disease, identified by anti-endomysial antibody (EMA) positivity. The team included C. Canavan, R. F. Logan, K. T. Khaw, and J. West. They are variously affiliated with the Division of Epidemiology and Public Health at University of Nottingham in Nottingham, UK, with the NIHR Biomedical Research Unit of the Nottingham Digestive Diseases Centre at Nottingham University Hospital in Nottingham, UK, and with the Department of Public Health and Primary Care, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK. For their study, the team chose their subjects from a general population aged 45-76 years in 1990. They then tracked all deaths using the Office for National Statistics. They calculated mortality rates per 1000 person year, making adjustments for age, gender, smoking and socioeconomic group using multivariate Cox regression to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results showed 117,914 patient years of follow-up from 7527 participants, with an average of 16.8 years. Eighty-seven patients suffered from undetected celiac disease, their all-cause mortality rate was 9.4 per 1000 person years (95% CI 5.4-16.1) compared with 12.7 (95% CI 12.1-13.4) in EMA-negative participants. The adjusted all-cause mortality hazard ratio was 0.98 (95% CI 0.57-1.69). Untreated celiac disease showed no increase in death due to cancer or circulatory diseases. Adjusted hazard ratios were 1.27 (95% CI 0.57-2.85) and 1.39 (95% CI 0.66-2.92) respectively. The research team found no higher overall mortality in people older than 45 years with undetected coeliac disease compared with the general population. They also found no increase in deaths related to circulatory disease or cancer. The team concludes that these results do not support routine screening people older than 45 years for celiac disease. Source: Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2011 Aug 17. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2036.2011.04811.x.
  8. Celiac.com 06/20/2011 - A team of researchers set out to assess menopause-associated disorders and fertile life span in women with untreated celiac disease compared to those who followed a long-term gluten-free diet. The research team included Antonella Santonicola, MD, Paola Iovino, MD, Carmelina Cappello, MD, Pietro Capone, MD, Paolo Andreozzi, MD, and Carolina Ciacci, MD. For their study, the team recruited 33 post-menopausal women with untreated celiac disease, 25 celiac women who had followed a gluten-free diet for at least ten years before menopause, and 45 healthy volunteers as a control group. The team used the Menopause Rating Scale questionnaire to gather information on menopause-associated disorders among study participants. They also used the International Physical Activity Questionnaire to chart information on physical activity. Overall, results showed that the women with untreated celiac disease had a shorter overall fertile life spans than did the control women. This was due to both a higher age of menarche and a lower age of menopause (P G 0.01). Women with untreated celiac disease also showed higher scores for hot flushes, muscle/joint problems, and irritability than the control group. An increase of 49.4%, 121.4%, and 58.6%, respectively; P G 0.05). In contrast with the untreated celiac women, those who followed a long-term gluten-free diet showed no significant difference in the duration of fertile life span. They also had about half as many muscle/joint problems than the untreated group, with a total reduction of 47.1%; P G 0.05. The data show that women with untreated celiac disease have later menarche and earlier menopause, which shortens their fertility periods compared to healthy women without celiac disease. Also, they perceive hot flushes and irritability much more intensely than control subjects. Women with celiac disease can prolong their fertility life span at least ten years prior to starting menopause. Lastly, untreated celiac disease may increase women's overall discomfort levels, and thus contribute to low physical exercise and/or poorer quality of life frequently reported by untreated celiac women. Source: The North American Menopause Society DOI: 10.1097/gme.0b013e3182188421
  9. Celiac.com 01/25/20010 - Women with celiac disease face greater risks for adverse pregnancy outcomes. A team of researchers recently set out to examine the effects of treated and untreated maternal celiac disease on infant birthweight and preterm birth. Among their findings are that expectant mothers with celiac disease face a higher risk of underweight and early-term birth than those without celiac disease. The research team included A.S. Khashan, T.B. Henriksen, P.B. Mortensen, R. McNamee, F.P. McCarthy, M.G. Pedersen and L.C. Kenny. They are affiliated variously with the Anu Research Centre of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University College Cork at Cork University Maternity Hospital in Ireland, the Perinatal Epidemiology Research Unit in the Department of Paediatrics at Aarhus University Hospital, the National Centre for Register-based Research at the University of Aarhus, Denmark, and the Biostatistics Group, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK. For their data, they used a population-based cohort study of all live births in Denmark between 1 January 1979 and 31 December 2004. During that period, 836,241 mothers gave birth to a total of 1,504,342 babies. Mothers with diagnosed celiac disease gave birth to 1105 of those babies, while 346 were born to women with undiagnosed celiac disease. The team considered mothers with diagnosed celiac disease to be following a gluten free diet, and those with undiagnosed celiac disease to be on a gluten-inclusive diet. The team measured outcomes based on birthweight, small for gestational age (SGA: birthweight <10th centile), very small for gestational age (VSGA: birthweight <5th centile) and preterm birth. They then compared the results for the treated and untreated celiac disease mothers with those of a celiac-free reference group. The research team found that mothers with untreated celiac disease gave birth to smaller babies [difference = –98 g (95% CI: –130, –67)], with a higher risk of SGA [OR = 1.31 (95% CI: 1.06, 1.63)], VSGA [OR = 1.54 (95% CI: 1.17, 2.03)] and early birth [OR = 1.33 (95% CI: 1.02, 1.72)] compared with women with no celiac disease. The good news is that mothers with treated celiac disease showed no increased risk of reduced mean birthweight, or of delivering SGA and VSGA infants or preterm birth compared with mothers with no celiac disease. From the results, the research team concluded that untreated maternal celiac disease increases the risk of low birthweight, SGA and VSGA, and preterm birth. Diagnosis and treatment of maternal celiac disease with a gluten-free diet seems to return the birthweight and preterm birth rate to one comparable to women without celiac disease. This study drives home the importance of expectant mothers with celiac disease maintaining a gluten-free diet to promote a healthy delivery. Source: Human Reproduction, doi:10.1093/humrep/dep409
  10. Am J Med 2004;116:312-317. Italian researchers have concluded that as many as 73% of patients with untreated celiac disease have at least one brain region that is hypoperfused (the blood vessels are damaged), although the condition is rare in the non-celiac and treated celiac disease populations. Dr. Giovanni Addolorato, from the Catholic University in Rome, and colleagues looked at 15 untreated and 15 treated (on gluten-free diets) celiac disease patients and compared them with 27 healthy controls. They found that 11 (73%) of the untreated celiac disease patients exhibited hypoperfusion in at least one cerebral region, when only one treated patient and no controls had the problem. Additionally they found that in 7 of the 26 brain regions that they looked at, blood flow was significantly lower in untreated patients than in controls, and no blood flow differences were detected between the treated group and the control group. According to the researchers the cause of the vascular brain damage in celiac disease is unclear at this point, but it may be related to the increased intestinal blood flow, and/or endothelial inflammation caused by the autoimmune disease, perhaps involving antigliadin antibodies or unidentified neurotoxic antibodies.
  11. Celiac.com 06/30/2008 - The results of a Hungarian study published recently in the June issue of Pediatrics suggest that people with untreated celiac disease show abnormal resistance to the hepatitis B (HBV) vaccine, while celiac patients on a gluten-free diet show a near normal response to the vaccine. A team of doctors led by Dr. Eva Nemes, at the University of Debrecen, administered 2 to 3 doses of recombinant HBV vaccine to 128 patients with celiac disease and an age matched control group of 113 non-celiac patients within a 6-month period. Twenty-two of the celiac patients were following a gluten-free diet when they received the vaccine. One month after the last HBV vaccination, the team took blood samples to look for anti-HBV antibodies. The group of 22 patients who received the vaccination while on a gluten-free diet had a sero-conversion rate of 95.5%, which means that more than 9 out of 10 patients developed the desired resistance to hepatitis B. The other 106 patients with celiac disease, as well as the control group, were vaccinated at approximately 14 years of age, and their immune response was evaluated by measuring anti-HBV titers about two years later. Of the 106 subjects with celiac disease, seventy had been diagnosed and were maintaining a strict gluten-free diet when they were vaccinated, twenty-seven were undiagnosed and untreated, and nine were diagnosed, but not following a gluten-free diet. The seventy subjects with celiac disease that was diagnosed and treated showed a sero-conversion rate of 61.4%. Given the size of the study samples, that’s not significantly different from the 75.2% sero-conversion rate for the control group. The big difference arose in those subjects with undiagnosed celiac disease, who showed a response rate of just below 26%, which was substantially lower than the control group and the treated celiac patients. The nine patients with active celiac disease who were not faithfully following a gluten-free diet showed a response rate of 44.4%. The thirty-seven subjects with celiac disease who had failed to respond to the vaccine were placed on a gluten-free diet and given a follow-up vaccine. One month later 36 of them (over 97%) showed a positive response to the vaccine. The team concluded that the positive response to the vaccine by celiac patients who were following a gluten-free diet, and the high resistance shown by subjects with undiagnosed celiac disease, and those not following a gluten-free diet, indicates that active celiac disease may play a major role in a failure to respond to the vaccine. The team recommends that newly diagnosed patients be checked for resistance to the HBV vaccine, and that those showing resistance be placed on a gluten-free diet before receiving a follow-up dose. They did not go so far as to suggest that those showing resistance to the HBV vaccine be screened for celiac disease, but that would not seem unreasonable, given their results. Pediatrics 2008; 121:e1570-e1576.
  12. Gastroenterology 2002;122:881-888. Celiac.com 05/02/2002 - In the April issue of Gastroenterology Dr. Pekka Collin of the University of Tampere, Finland, and colleagues describe four patients with severe liver disease who were also found to have celiac disease. One of the patients had congenital liver fibrosis, one had massive hepatic steatosis, and two had progressive hepatitis without apparent origin. Three of the four were considered for liver transplantation. In each case a gluten-free diet reversed heptic dysfunction. The reasearchers then studied the prevalence of celiac disease in 185 adults who had already undergone liver transplantation. Eight of them (4.3%) tested positive for celiac disease, and it had already been detected in six of the eight prior to transplantation. Only one the the diagnosed patients followed a strict gluten-free diet. Of these eight patients, three had primary biliary cirrhosis, one had autoimmune hepatitis, one had primary sclerosing cholangitis, and one had congenital liver fibrosis. Additionally, one of the patients had autoimmune hepatitis and one had secondary sclerosing cholangitis. The researchers also noted that not all of patients with both liver and celiac disease showed symptoms of celiac disease, which suggests that the liver disease may not be caused by malabsorption. Dr. Collin suggests that it could be a "gluten-dependent immunologically induced extraintestinal manifestation of celiac disease." The researchers conclude that some cases of serious liver disease may result from unrecognized celiac disease, and patients with severe liver disease should also be evaluated for celiac disease. Further, dietary treatment in patients with both celiac and liver diseases may prevent progression to hepatic failure, even in cases in which liver transplantation is considered.
  13. Gut 2005;54:54-59. Celiac.com 01/20/2005 - A link between untreated celiac disease and a rare enteropathy-type T-cell lymphoma (ETTL) has been well established by several studies. According to Dr. Karin Ekstrom Smedby of the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm and colleagues, there is also an increase in the prevalence of other types of lymphomas in those with celiac disease, such as B cell and non-intestinal lymphomas. In their study the researchers reviewed and reclassified 56 cases of malignant lymphomas that occurred in 11,650 hospitalized celiac disease patients in Sweden. The observed numbers of lymphoma subtypes were compared with those expected in the Swedish population. The researchers discovered that a majority of the lymphomas were not intestinal T-cell lymphomas, but were B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). In addition, 44% of the patients with B cell NHL had a history of other autoimmune/inflammatory diseases. As expected, the relative risks for T-cell NHL and primary gastrointestinal lymphomas were markedly increased. According to the researchers: "Most lymphomas complicating coeliac disease are indeed related to the disease and are not of the ETTL-type. There was a remarkable aggregation of autoimmune/inflammatory disorders, female sex, coeliac disease, and B cell lymphoma."
  14. Dig Liver Dis. 2004 Aug;36(8):513-8. Celiac.com 12/11/2004 - An Italian study was carried out to determine the incidence of brain perfusion abnormalities in those with celiac disease, and whether gluten intake and associated autoimmune diseases may be considered risk factors in causing cerebral impairment. The researchers used brain single-photon emission computed tomography to examine the brains of 34 adult celiac patients--16 on a gluten-free diet, 18 on a gluten-containing diet, and 18 with other autoimmune diseases--and compared them to 10 age and sex-matched controls with normal jejunal mucosa. The researchers found that 24 out of the 34 in the study--a full 71%--had brain tomography abnormalities. The most significant brain abnormalities were found in the patients with untreated celiac disease (74%), and in those with associated autoimmune disease (69%). The abnormalities mainly affected the frontal region of the brain. The researchers conclude that brain perfusion seems common in celiac disease, but does not appear to be related to associated-autoimmunity, and the condition may be improved by a gluten-free diet.
  15. Gut. 2004 Jan;53(1):149-51 Celiac.com 12/31/2003 – Italian researchers report in the journal Gut that their previous hypothesis which was based on their hospital study that reported a 1 in 80 incidence of celiac disease in pregnant women and an unfavorable pregnancy outcome for them needs to be revised. With the goal of proving their initial research the group conducted a "large population based study on a stratified sample from the whole Campania region" in Italy. The study looked at 5,055 pregnant women and tested them for IgA class anti-tissue transglutaminase (TGASE) antibodies using the ELISA method. In addition "Endomysial antibodies (EMA) were investigated on thin sections of human cord blood by an immunofluorescence test. The HLA class II DQA1*0501/DQB1*02 and DQA1*0301/DQB1*0302 haplotypes were assessed using the Eurospital Eu-DQ kit." The researchers found that 51 of the 5,055 patients tested positive for celiac disease, and 12 women with known celiac disease were added to the results which yielded a ratio of 1 in 80 pregnant women with celiac disease, results that matched the groups first study. When the celiac-positive groups birth outcomes were compared with the normal group the researchers did "not observe an excess risk of abortion, premature delivery, small birth weight, or intrauterine growth retardation," although anemia was more frequent in the celiac disease group. The researchers conclude that "undiagnosed coeliac disease is frequent among pregnant women (>1%) but is not associated with an unfavorable outcome of pregnancy."
  16. Am J Gastroenterol 1999;94:2435-2440. (Celiac.com 04/10/2000) A study by Danish researchers that was published in the September issue of the American Journal of Gastroenterology concludes that treating women who have celiac disease before they become pregnant improves their birth outcomes. According to Dr. Bente Norgard and colleagues of the University of Aarhus, Denmark, Our study emphasizes the importance of encouraging fertile women to maintain a gluten-free diet once they have been diagnosed, because the time of establishing the diagnosis and subsequent treatment is the major predictor for a favorable birth outcome. The Danish team examined the outcomes of 211 newborns from 127 women with celiac disease, and compared them to 1,260 births to women without celiac disease, from data collected between 1977 and 1992 by the Danish Medical Birth Registry. Their results showed that birth outcomes were worse in women with untreated celiac disease than in women who had been hospitalized for celiac disease, and that the risk of low birth weight and intrauterine growth retardation were increased 2.6 and 3.4 fold respectively when compared to the infants born to women with celiac disease and no prior hospitalization for the disease. These same risks were not increased in women with celiac disease who had prior hospitalization for it. According to Dr. Norgard, Our results emphasize the importance of clinical awareness of this chronic disease. Their conclusion is that untreated celiac disease is a major risk factor for poor birth outcomes, and that the treatment of celiac disease in women is important in the prevention of fetal growth retardation.
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