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Found 3 results

  1. Celiac.com 11/30/2017 - Talk about handling a celiac disease diagnosis in style. This past summer, "Us" star Mandy Moore showed us how its done, when she documented the process of working with her doctor to determine if she had celiac disease. She even posted a photo of her endoscopy visit for her Instagram followers. Moore captioned the post: "Grog city. Just had an upper endoscopy to officially see whether or not I have celiac (only way to officially diagnose)…things are looking 👌)." Later, and also on Instagram, she revealed that she had been diagnosed with celiac disease. "Well, this definitely takes the (now gluten free cake) for bummer news," she wrote on her Instagram story at the time. "Any celiac sufferers out there with any helpful tips??" Maybe consider looking at Celic.com for helpful tips and information on living with celiac disease and eating gluten-free? Later, she posted another message, thanking her fans for sharing their knowledge with her, adding that there were "so many lovely humans out there. My heart is full." Moore seems to be embracing the realities of a gluten-free diet. Later, in an Instagram post celebrating her engagement to Taylor Goldsmith, Moore thanked her friends and family for their support, and noted that she planned to "enjoy some delightful gluten-free tea sandwiches (and 🥂) like ladies do." Best of luck to Mandy Moore in dealing with her new found celiac disease diagnosis.
  2. Celiac.com 03/24/2014 - Two new studies have confirmed colonization of gluten-degrading bacteria in the human mouth and in the upper gastrointestinal tracts respectively. Both studies come out of the Department of Periodontology and Oral Biology, Boston University Henry M. Goldman School of Dental Medicine in Boston, Massachusetts. The research teams included Maram Zamakhchari, Guoxian Wei, Floyd Dewhirst, Jaeseop Lee, Detlef Schuppan, Frank G. Oppenheim, and Eva J. Helmerhorst. Gluten is notoriously hard for mammals to digest, because gliadin proteins resist mammalian proteolytic enzymes in the gut, so researchers wanted to find sources of gluten-digesting microbial enzymes from the upper gastro-intestinal tract. These microbial enzymes have the potential to neutralize the gluten peptides that act as celiac disease triggers. In the first study the researchers assessed proteolytic activity in suspended dental plaque towards a) gliadin-derived paranitroanilide(pNA)-linked synthetic enzyme substrates a mixture of natural gliadins and c) synthetic highly immunogenic gliadin peptides (33-mer of α2-gliadin and 26-mer of γ-gliadin). In addition, they conducted gliadin zymography to establish the approximate molecular weights and pH activity profiles of the gliadin-degrading oral enzymes and performed liquid iso-electric focusing to determine overall enzyme iso-electric points. Their results provide the first known evidence of gluten-degrading microorganisms associated with the upper gastro-intestinal tract. Such microorganisms may play a hitherto unappreciated role in the digestion of dietary gluten and thus protection from celiac disease in subjects at risk. In the second study, the team employed a selective plating strategy using gluten agar to obtain oral microorganisms with gluten-degrading capacity. They then used16S rDNA gene sequencing to carry out microbial speciations. To determine enzyme activity, they used gliadin-derived enzymatic substrates, gliadins in solution, gliadin zymography, and 33-mer a-gliadin and 26-mer c-gliadin immunogenic peptides. They separated fragments of the gliadin peptides by RP-HPLC, and structurally characterized them using mass spectrometry. They found that strains Rothia mucilaginosa and Rothia aeria showed high gluten-degrading activity. For example, gliadins (250 mg/ml) added to Rothia cell suspensions (OD620 1.2) degraded by 50% after 30 minutes of incubation. Importantly, the 33-mer and 26-mer immunogenic peptides were also cleaved, primarily C-terminal to Xaa-Pro-Gln (XPQ) and Xaa-Pro-Tyr (XPY). The major gliadin-degrading enzymes produced by the Rothia strains were 70–75 kDa in size, and the enzyme expressed by Rothia aeria was active over a wide pH range (pH 3–10). While the human digestive enzyme system lacks the capacity to cleave immunogenic gluten, such activities are naturally present in the oral microbial enzyme repertoire. Taken together, these studies suggest a potential for these bacteria to fuel the development of compounds that can degrade of harmful gluten peptides that trigger celiac disease in susceptible individuals. Source: PLoS One. 2011;6(9):e24455. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0024455. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20948997
  3. Celiac.com 07/02/2010 - Serological screening of healthy volunteers from around the world estimates that the prevalence for celiac disease is approximately 0.5%- 1% of the total population. However, a recent meta-analysis denotes that the actual ratio of known or undiagnosed celiac cases is closer to 1 in 7 people. Due to knowledge of celiac, acute clinical suspicion, and increased endoscopy accessibility some areas have reported celiac prevalence as high as 5.2%; suggesting that there is a considerable gap in effectively detecting new cases of celiac disease. Researchers further investigated the statistics on celiac disease prevalence by evaluating the incidence of celiac disease among “adult out-patients biopsied during upper endoscopy with typical and atypical symptoms”. One hundred and fifty out-patients including 94 women and 56 men with a median age of 45, were enrolled for the study between January 2007 and December 2008. There is no current standard classification for endoscopic lesions found from celiac disease. As such, this study used a method of classification where-as patients were labeled as; normal, mild, moderate, or severe. To detect villous atrophy, biopsy's were taken from patients that were only presenting endoscopic appearances, which are indicative of celiac disease. Results which had t-TGA levels greater than 24 U/mL were considered positive for celiac disease. Patients were also positively diagnosed as celiac if they exhibited some degree of histological abnormality. Of the hundred and fifty subjects studied, twelve were diagnosed positively for celiac disease, and nine of them were women. The most commonly exhibited gastrointestinal pathology diagnosed in the study, was gatroduodenitis peptic ulcer. All of the subjects that had biopsy proven t-TGA, had positive antibodies, and the values of t-TGA increased depending on the intensity of the mucosal lesions. Additionally, all subjects were assessed for the existence of gastrointestinal and extra-intestinal symptoms. Typical gastrointestinal symptoms of celiac include diarrhea, anemia and weight loss, as evident in 58.32% of the subjects studied, while atypical symptoms were present in 25% of the test subjects. 41.66% of the subjects had iron deficiency anemia(IDA), 8.33% had osteopenia, 16.66% had hypocalcaemiaia and hypomagnesaemia. Additionally, extra-intestinal symptoms associated with gastrointestinal manifestations were found in 16.66% of the subjects that had astenia, and in 41.55% of the subjects with weight loss. Almost every celiac case observed demonstrated symptoms that progressively increased in severity. No differences were observed among patients in the control group, and in the celiac patients with regard to gastrointestinal problems and discomforts. However, IDA was observed most frequently in patients with celiac disease than in the control group. All patients that were diagnosed were recommended to strictly adhere to a gluten-free diet. One person refused to comply with the diet, but the other 90% followed the diet for one year. Of the patients following a gluten-free diet, a total histological response was observed. Severity of mucosal lesions decreased in 70% of the subjects, and all subjects were asymptomatic after one year on a gluten-free diet. The final incidence of celiac disease in the study was 6%. Screening studies such as these, demonstrate that the prevalence of celiac disease is increasing. When duodenal biopsy was preformed in patients during routine upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, the incidence of celiac disease was observed at rates as high as 12%. Additionally, when clinical presentations of symptoms like diarrhea, anemia, and weight loss are used as screening criteria for celiac, increased rates of celiac disease diagnosis' were evident. Strict adherence to a completely gluten-free diet is still the only cure for celiac disease. Increased doctor and patient awareness of celiac, as well as an increase in celiac screening (especially for patients with typical celiac symptoms or atypical symptoms untreated by standard methods) is still needed to avoid more cases of undiagnosed celiac disease, and to eliminate unnecessary suffering for those misdiagnosed or undiagnosed. Source: Journal of Experimental Medical & Surgical Research, Year XVII · Nr.1/2010 · Pag.23 -27
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