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Found 10 results

  1. Hi all, I was diagnosed with both Celiac and Microscopic Colitis (Callogenous) last year, and while I'm feeling largely better, I've never been able to find a succinct and ready-to-go guide for people with MC and Celiac, and am having an especially hard time finding one that is friendly for vegetarians. Any advice, links, or reads that anyone might have would be greatly appreciated!
  2. lorally

    A Creamy Blueberry Banana Smoothie

    This creamy blueberry banana smoothie is packed with calcium, vitamin C, B-vitamins, and iron. And, it's high in protein and fiber. Plus, all my smoothie recipes are always gluten-free and dairy-free. Let me know if you try this recipe. Creamy Vanilla Blueberry Smoothie Yield: 2 - 4 servings; 6 cups; 48 ounces Duration: 5 minutes Ingredients 1.5 cups crushed ice 2 Frozen Bananas 2 Tablespoons Arbonne Vanilla Protein Shake Mix, (or another protein mix) 1 ½ cups unsweetened, unflavored almond milk 1.5 cups fresh or frozen blueberries Directions Place ingredients in the blender in the following order: ice, frozen banana, protein powder, almond milk, and blueberries. Blend all ingredients in a blender on high, until creamy and smooth, about 1 minute. Kitchen Tools Blender or Vitamix Notes I prefer to use crushed ice and a frozen banana which yields a colder smoothie. I peel and slice the banana before freezing, and I freeze the bananas at least 24 hours ahead of time. Slicing the banana helps to ensure the smoothie blends easily.
  3. This recipe comes to us from Aviva Mandl (Enjoy and have a good Pesach!). 2 carrots 2 stalks of celery 1 small or medium onion 2 eggs ¼ cup of oil 1 six-ounce box of Manischewitz Potato Pancake Mix Grind onion, carrots and celery in a food processor. Put into a large mixing bowl. Add the box of potato pancake mix, eggs and oil. Mix well and spoon onto foil to form two to three rolls, approximately 2 inches in diameter by 8 inches long. Wrap and pinch the ends of the foil closed. Bake at 350 degrees F for 1 hour. Remove from the oven and let stand about 10 minutes. Unwrap foil and slice into pieces to serve. I typically have added salt and pepper to this recipe, however since the potato pancake mix is seasoned, I opted not to do so. I recommend doubling or tripling the recipe and freezing kishkes for another meal (I doubled the recipe when I made it tonight and wound up with two really nice-sized rolls and 2 small ones). If freezing, you dont need to bake it first. Ive found my family likes this recipe more than any of the store-bought kishkes.
  4. Celiac.com 02/12/2016 - Whether you're looking to make a big impact at your next potluck, or just looking to feed a small army of hungry mouths without working too hard, this hearty vegetarian chili has you covered. Ingredients: 2 cans black or pinto beans (15 ounces each) 8 fresh tomatillos 1 medium zucchini 1 can tomatoes in purée, coarsely chopped ½ cup canned or frozen corn ½ cup vegetarian broth 3 tablespoons olive oil 1 medium onion, diced 2 tablespoons garlic, minced 1 medium red bell pepper, chopped 1 medium green bell pepper, chopped 1 cup thinly sliced carrots 3 tablespoons chili powder, to taste 1 tablespoons ground cumin 1 teaspoon salt Pinch of ground cayenne pepper, to taste Directions: In a large stock pot, heat oil over medium heat. Add onion and garlic and cook 2 to 3 minutes, stirring often, until onion starts to soften. Add bell peppers and carrots, and cook 5 to 6 minutes, stirring often, until carrots and peppers soften a bit. Add chili powder, cumin, salt and ground red pepper, and cook for another minute or so, stirring well. Add tomatillos and zucchini, and cook until tomatillos soften, about 10 minutes, stirring often. Stir in remaining ingredients. Raise to a boil, and then reduce heat to low, cover and simmer 20 minutes. Uncover and simmer another minutes or so, stirring occasionally, until sauce has thickened and vegetables are tender to a fork.
  5. shimallalex

    Just The Beginning

    Hi, my name is Alex and I'm a college freshman. At only 18, I’ve been gluten-free for ten years (pretty much my entire life). My mom, my two siblings, and I were diagnosed when I was only eight years old. I’ve had the experience of being ill every night and not knowing the cause. Of spending the majority of my childhood indoors because I was too tired to play outside. Of struggling to pay attention in class because it was too hard to focus. Starting out was a challenge. When we began, there were no options for being gluten-free and the food was definitely not as appetizing. Our whole world was turned on its head. Today, there are so many grocery stores filled with food, restaurants that cater to gluten-free needs, and the online options are endless. I created healthyfoodhealthyyou.weebly.com in an effort to help people making the transition to a gluten-free lifestyle. Celiac disease is not a diet or fad for so many people. It’s scary and daunting, and the reality of their lives from now on. However, you will survive, just like so many others. In addition to being gluten-free, my family maintains a very healthy lifestyle. I have recently adopted a vegetarian outlook (for health reasons). Through my website, I offer gluten-free and vegetarian recipes, but also advice. Your world will be forever changed when you are diagnosed, whether medically or self-diagnosis. Either way, remember that this is a change for the better. Just because it’s called Celiac disease doesn’t mean it’s a curse.
  6. I've been a vegetarian (technically pescitarian) since I was 15 or so for ethical reasons (mainly animal treatment & environmental concerns). I love to cook and have never been challenged to stick to my non meat diet, and I've NEVER been tempted to eat meat. The thought generally repulses me. Over the past 7 months or so I've been sorting out my many food intolerances, including gluten & casein, onions, garlic, peppers, peanuts, sugars, and general sensitivity to FODMAP sugars. It has been a big change, but a good one since I've finally figured out the cause of my IBS, daily headaches, fatigue, etc. etc. If I eat gluten I get a full immune reaction which puts me in bed for 24-48 hours and feeling out of sorts for days. If I eat dairy or the veggies, I get an IBS reaction (bad gas, cramping, dyspepsia). So, I sometimes cheat on the dairy & veg, but never with gluten. Factor in a few other things: my hubby is also a vegetarian, and we both travel for work (will be on the road for the next 3 months). All of this has me really questioning whether I should be self limiting my diet based on ethical reasons, when my body is already eliminating so many sources of food. I don't find it very hard to cook for myself at home, but I do wonder if I get enough protein and variation in my diet, and also if I am eating too much fish & (non-gmo) soy. If I introduced meat (or some types of it) it seems like it would be easier to eat out, and eat with family / friends, who struggle a lot with what I'm "allowed" to eat. But that said, I still have very strong concerns about eating meat for health/environmental/ethical reasons, and I feel like I'm simply "giving up" and feel embarrassed to talk about it with my veggie husband and family who lovingly mock me as some sort of vegetarian activist. Obviously eating meat wont solve any problems - because then we'll need to figure out who cooks in the family, and it will probably be more costly. Apologies for the long rant, these arguments just keep going through my head! Wondering if anyone has experience with this? I'm not looking for preaching from either side of the fence condemning me for my thoughts - constructive feedback only, please
  7. This is a link to an article about a study showing that some vegan and vegetarian females had improved mental performance on some mental tasks after taking creatine. http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/evolutionary-psychiatry/201202/your-brain-creatine Seems creatine is used by the brain as part of it's energy supply. The body can make creatine but it seems the process is not as efficient as taking it in through food. Maybe it's not really able to make enough of it for optimal brain performance? Anyway, this may be a supplement that could help vegans and vegetarians.
  8. Hi, I'm new here and although I've been wary about eating healthy, in terms of salads, fruits and vegtables for a number of years, I'm 28, I recently decided to go 100% gluten and dairy free (like checking all labels and watching out for cross contamination, because I have had a number of what I thought to be abnormal health issues over the years which never really made that much sense. I'm in good shape and feel fine, relative to how I usually feel, but just still wonder could some of these issues be related to the same source, gluten? My Mom finally went gluten free a couple months ago. She had IBS and GERD for years and it has helped her a lot. She was not overweight but also lost 10 pounds in a month. I've been mostly vegetarian as an adult and am very into not eating processed foods or added sugars, so I'm adding some meat into my new diet, which I can already feel some difference, in terms of being more calm. As a kid my Mom, who didn't know at the time, fed us a lot of bad grain type foods and we always had ice cream and those processed betty crocker baking items around, but all of us seemed to have had pretty good metabolisms, considering what is in that stuff! My dad still eats all those processed foods and has always been extremely skinny, but is generally depressed and irritable. Here are the health issues I've had that I would really appreciate any feedback on the relation to gluten or casein, if know from personal experience: -starting as a teenager felt foggy headed and somewhat depressed. -Had red flushed cheeks and rash on backs of upper arms for a few years in early teens -got first period at age 14 (which I always thought was a little old) -didn't have period for almost year ages 15-16 -had pnemonia -very low resting heartrate at age 16, normal weight, doctors told me i must have an eating disorder, a heart condition, or brain tumor, eventually blood test showed very high TSH and I was diagnosed hypo-thyroid from hasimotos. -diagnosed with adhd in college, but have had the symptoms for as long as my parents can remember. - have had anemia or low iron and also a lot of coldness at the extremities since being a teenager. -have had periods of time where i am really into oatmeal (plain), nothing added, i think this is because of cross contamination with gluten. Thanks so much for reading
  9. This recipe is very exciting to me, because it is a vegetarian version of my favorite food. Prior to going gluten-free and eliminating meat from my diet, I loved chicken tikka masala. This recipe is wonderful because it is an easy gluten-free, dairy-free, and meat-free recipe! Vegetarian Tikka Masala (Gluten-Free) (serves four) Ingredients: Masala Paste: 2 teaspoons fresh ginger, minced 2 teaspoons garlic, minced 1 teaspoon cumin powder 1 teaspoon coriander powder ¼ teaspoon turmeric 1 teaspoon cayenne pepper powder 1 tablespoo paprika 1 teaspoon garam masala Everything Else: 4 tablespoons olive oil 5 cardamom pods 1 cinnamon stick 1 ½ sweet onions, finely diced 1 large tomato, finely diced ½ cup water himalayan or sea salt to taste 2 medium russet potatoes, diced ½ green cabbage, sliced into thin strips 2 cups frozen or fresh peas coconut milk To Make: Mix all of the ingredients for the Masala Paste together. Start cooking the rice cooking according to the package instructions. Heat the olive oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the cinnamon stick and cardamom pods for just a few seconds to add fragrance to the oil, then remove them. Careful not to leave them too long or it will overwhelm the flavor of your masala. Add the onions and stir until they are browned. Add the masala paste and stir for a minute, then add the tomato and stir for another minute, then add the water and bring it to a simmer. Add Salt to taste. Add the chopped potatoes, cabbage, and peas. Reduce the heat to medium-low and cook, stirring frequently, until the potatoes and cabbage are tender and a fork can slide easily through the potato pieces. Add coconut milk to taste--the coconut milk will create a sauce. Note: you can substitute yogurt for coconut milk if you like. Serve over aromatic Basmati rice or rice of your choice.
  10. It's Chinese New Year and spring rolls are a must have for atraditional Chinese dinner. After a spring roll is deep fried, the skinturns golden, and the color and the shape of the spring roll representa "gold bar." Serving spring rolls during Chinese New Year is done topresent "gold" to guests and wish all the guests luck in making moremoney in the coming year. And yes, everyone cares about moneynowadays..and Chinese people sometimes do care about money way toomuch! In a more traditional Chinese spring roll, the fillings oftencontain pork and shrimp along with shredded vegetable. As for me, Iopted for vegetarian version, and tofu is used as protein. I have oftenbrought my version of spring rolls to potluck dinners and everyoneoften asks me for the recipe. I am finally going to share it here. Atypical spring roll wrapper is made with wheat--to make a gluten-freeversion you need to use Vietnamese rice paper wraps instead. Thegluten-free version is healthier since it's not fried. My version ofthe spring roll does not use the traditional ingredients that my momwould normally use in Hong Kong or my Vietnamese friend would do in amore traditional Vietnamese spring roll or summer roll. People often think that it's time consuming to make spring rolls. In reality, you will be surprised how easy it is. Preparation Time: 20-30 minutes Cook Time: 15 minutes NOTE:It is the best to prepare the fillings and let it cool and drained anyliquid from the filling before wrapping. The heat and the moisture willpotentially break the wrapper. Also, you can use any kind of vegetablefor the fillings. But make sure to chop it up finely. Ingredients: 1 package of spring roll wrapper or rice paper wrapper 1 package of rainbow slaw or brocolli slaw (It can be found in salad session in supermarket) 1 package of Tofu Cutlet or 5-spiced tofu or spice tofu or extra firm tofu - cut into 1" strip 2 cups of bean sprouts 1 package of Chinese Pickled Vegetable (Zhacai) or 1/2 cup of dill pickles - it's optional - cut into 1" strip 2 tablespoon of gluten-free soy sauce 1 teaspoon of kosher salt 1 tablespoon of Chinese cooking wine or red wine 1/2 teaspoon of white pepper 1/2 teaspoon of sugar 2 teaspoon of sesame seeds oil 2 tablespoon of cooking oil, prefer olive oil 1 teaspoon of rice vinegar (dipping sauce) 1 tablepoon of gluten-free soy sauce (dipping sauce) Some sesame seed oil (or hot oil if you prefer spicy) Fillings: Heat Wok without any oil, cut the tofu and pickles into 1" strip and wash all vegetables and drain them. When the wok is hot, cook beansprouts and stir it until they are heated through, about 2 minutes.Note: Make sure to keep stirring to prevent sticking on the wok. Removefrom wok and set aside. Put oil in the wok and gentlymove the wok left and right to let the oil coat the bottom, put inrainbow slaw and tofu and stir them for a minute, then add pickles andstir for another minute. Add soy sauce, wine, salt, sugar, white pepper and stir ituntil the seasonings are well blended into the vegetables; about 3-4minutes. Make sure not to overcook the filling, you would like thevegetables still a little crunchy. Add the bean sprouts into the wok and stir until they areheated through, about 1 minute or so. Taste the fillings and add moresalt if necessary. Turn the heat off and add the sesame seed oil and stir the oil into the fillings. Put the fillings into a drainer and cool off. Gluten Free Version: Fill a large shallow bowl with warm water, put rice paper into theshallow bowl one at a time; otherwise, they will stick together.When the rice paper is soft about 15 second, remove from bowl and drainthe water off of it. Lay 1 rice paper wrapper in a dry cloth and put 2 spoonfulsof the fillings in the middle of the wrapper; make sure not toover-stuff the wrapper, you would need to leave 1.5" on each sides inorder to wrap the spring roll. Fold up the bottom of the wrapper. The bottom of the wrapperis the part that is closest to the filling. Fold this up over thefilling and press down slightly. Fold both sides to the center so that the edge of both sides meet in the middle Hold the sides and roll the spring up until the end of the wrapper Combine rice vinegar, soy sauce and sesame seed oil in a dipping bowl and serve immediately Happy Cooking!
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