Jump to content
  • Sign Up

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'weight'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Celiac Disease & Gluten-Free Diet Forums

  • Diagnosis & Recovery, Related Disorders & Research
    • Calendar of Events
    • Celiac Disease Pre-Diagnosis, Testing & Symptoms
    • Post Diagnosis, Recovery & Treatment of Celiac Disease
    • Related Disorders & Celiac Research
    • Dermatitis Herpetiformis
    • Gluten Sensitivity and Behavior
  • Support & Help
    • Coping with Celiac Disease
    • Publications & Publicity
    • Parents' Corner
    • Gab/Chat Room
    • Doctors Treating Celiac Disease
    • Teenagers & Young Adults Only
    • Pregnancy
    • Friends and Loved Ones of Celiacs
    • Meeting Room
    • Celiac Disease & Sleep
    • Celiac Support Groups
  • Gluten-Free Lifestyle
    • Gluten-Free Foods, Products, Shopping & Medications
    • Gluten-Free Recipes & Cooking Tips
    • Gluten-Free Restaurants
    • Ingredients & Food Labeling Issues
    • Traveling with Celiac Disease
    • Weight Issues & Celiac Disease
    • International Room (Outside USA)
    • Sports and Fitness
  • When A Gluten-Free Diet Just Isn't Enough
    • Food Intolerance & Leaky Gut
    • Super Sensitive People
    • Alternative Diets
  • Forum Technical Assistance
    • Board/Forum Technical Help
  • DFW/Central Texas Celiacs's Events
  • DFW/Central Texas Celiacs's Groups/Organizations in the DFW area

Celiac Disease & Gluten-Free Diet Blogs

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.

Categories

  • Celiac.com Sponsors
  • Celiac Disease Info
  • Safe Gluten-Free Food List / Unsafe Foods & Ingredients
  • Gluten-Free Food & Product Reviews
  • Gluten-Free Recipes
    • Recipes by Continent / Country
    • Biscuits, Buns, Rolls, Scones & Waffles (Gluten-Free Recipes)
    • Dessert Recipes: Pastries, Cakes, Cookies (Gluten-Free)
    • Bread Recipes (Gluten-Free)
    • Flour Mixes (Gluten-Free)
    • Kids Recipes (Gluten-Free)
    • Snacks & Appetizers (Gluten-Free Recipes)
    • Muffins (Gluten-Free Recipes)
    • Pancakes (Gluten-Free Recipes)
    • Pizzas & Pizza Crusts (Gluten-Free Recipes)
    • Soups, Sauces, Dressings & Chowders (Gluten-Free Recipes)
    • Cooking Tips
  • Celiac Disease Diagnosis, Testing & Treatment
  • Celiac Disease & Gluten Intolerance Research
  • Miscellaneous Information on Celiac Disease
    • Additional Celiac Disease Concerns
    • Celiac Disease Research Projects, Fundraising, Epidemiology, Etc.
    • Conferences, Publicity, Pregnancy, Church, Bread Machines, Distillation & Beer
    • Gluten-Free Diet, Celiac Disease & Codex Alimentarius Wheat Starch
    • Gluten-Free Food Ingredient Labeling Regulations
    • Celiac.com Podcast Edition
  • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity
  • Celiac Disease & Related Diseases and Disorders
  • Origins of Celiac Disease
  • Gluten-Free Grains and Flours
  • Oats and Celiac Disease: Are They Gluten-Free?
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • Celiac Disease Support Groups
  • Celiac Disease Doctor Listing
  • Kids and Celiac Disease
  • Gluten-Free Travel
  • Gluten-Free Cooking
  • Gluten-Free
  • Allergy vs. Intolerance
  • Tax Deductions for Gluten-Free Food
  • Gluten-Free Newsletters & Magazines
  • Gluten-Free & Celiac Disease Links
  • History of Celiac.com

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Interests


Location


First Name


Last Name


City


State


Country


How did you hear about us?

Found 17 results

  1. So, I’m going through diagnosis and testing for coeliacs at the moment but I’m pretty certain I have it. one of my symptoms that occurred anoit 4 months ago has been a change in my breasts of all things! now I know that I have not gained weight, however my breasts grew about 2 cup sizes!! They became engorged, swollen, tender and heavy. I kept thinking it was my period due but then it carried on and no period ever came (my periods didn’t ever start until I went gluten-free). I went to the dr and they examined my breasts and definitely agreed they were very engorged and swollen but said it was most likely hormonal. basically ever since it’s been a problem and makes me feel so uncomfortable and depressed and despise myself as it makes me look ten times bigger than I actually am because I’m so top heavy now. I am a low end healthy weight but my breasts literally went from a 32 B/C cup to a 34 D/DD!! For my size this is so disproportionate as well😢 ive has several major ‘glutenenings’ over the last 6 weeks after I went gluten-free and they have become even more swollen and big. I also get regular periods now there about and every month my PMS symptoms are hell and my breasts go EVEN bigger so probably DD/E and it’s HORRIBLE. has anyone experienced this and if so DOES IT GO BACK TO NORMAL PLEASE??? ~Danni
  2. Celiac.com 02/12/2015 - Gwyneth Paltrow is making gluten-free celebrity news again for helping her longtime stylist go gluten-free and drop some major weight. David Babaii is one of Hollywood's top hair stylists. In addition to Paltrow, his celebrity roster includes Kate Hudson, Scarlett Johansson, Christina Aguilera and Uma Thurman, among others. After working with Paltrow for about 10 years, the man Vogue-crowned the "king of curls" had ballooned to 285 pounds with a 44-inch waist. At just five feet five inches tall, he became compelled to lose weight. In a recent exclusive with Marc Malkin in eonline, Babaii opens up about how Paltrow and Equinox trainer Will Castillo helped him lose 135 pounds in just four months. Babaii says that Paltrow was very supportive, non-judgmental, and encouraging of his efforts. When Babaii asked Paltrow about gluten, he says she advised him not to do anything drastic, and to take it slowly. And, armed with determination and with Paltrow's support and encouragement, Babaii began his transformation in earnest. Of course, being a personal of Gwyneth Paltrow has its perks. In Babaii's case, whenever he was hungry or in need of support, he could "email her any time of the day and if she wasn't sleeping, she'd reply right away," he told Malkin. "She would say, 'Try this. I think you'll like it. It's not boring.'"
  3. Celiac.com 08/25/2011 - This is a controversial topic. Elizabeth Hasselbeck’s book, The gluten-free Diet (1), has been attacked because it suggests that a gluten free diet can help some people lose weight. One celiac support group has condemned this book as misleading (2). However, I thought it was a pretty good book, and I’m grateful for the public attention that Hasselbeck has drawn to celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity. There are at least two sides to the question of whether a gluten free diet is useful for weight loss. As with much other dietary advice, each of these conflicting views is sometimes presented in very strident voices. On one side there are numerous websites and newspaper articles, with an array of “experts” weighing in on this issue, decrying the use of a gluten free diet for weight loss. I even saw a segment of a television show called “Dr. Oz” where the gluten free diet was asserted to cause only weight gain. On the same show the diet was referred to as a “fraud” with respect to weight loss. Similarly, one group of researchers claim that an important side effect of the gluten free diet is weight gain. Even some very popular advocates of the gluten free diet insist that it is inappropriate for weight loss. Yet there are some individuals who advocate this diet as an effective weight loss tool and there is some evidence to back them up. There are even a couple of research reports of weight loss on a gluten free diet. In fact there is at least one study that provides some support for each paradigm. So who are we to believe? What information supports each side of the argument? And how can we evaluate that information? Before we get to the evidence, however, I’d like to say that I have listened to Ms. Hasselbeck express some of her political and economic opinions. I am now of the firm belief that she is one of the five people on this continent who may know even less about these issues than I do. So let’s leave out the politics and confine our discussion to the issue of the gluten free diet and whether it is suitable for weight loss. The first and most compelling piece of evidence (for me) is a personal observation. I watched my mom try to lose weight, starting when I was in elementary school. She tried just about every diet out there, from radical fringe to mainstream. She drank protein powders mixed with water instead of eating meals. She tried eating these “rye” crackers that I thought tasted like cardboard.... very crunchy cardboard. She tried a low sodium diet, then a low fat diet, then a sugar free diet, an all fruit diet, a raw food diet, or maybe that was just a single diet of raw fruit. I’m not sure. She probably tried a host of other diets that I don’t remember, but I think you get the idea. She sometimes lost weight only to gain it back as soon as she stopped the diet. More often, she gave up because she got tired of being hungry all the time. She eventually gave up on dieting altogether and accepted being overweight. Then, about fifteen years ago, in her early-mid 70s, she started a gluten free diet. It wasn’t aimed at weight loss. She was trying to reduce the pain caused by her arthritis. In the first year and a half or two years, she lost 66 pounds. From that time onward, her weight continued to gradually diminish to the point where she had lost about 100 pounds over about ten years of eating gluten free. She was not trying to lose weight. She had long since given up on that objective. Yet the excess pounds just melted away. If only because of its weight loss benefits, I suspect that the gluten free diet has extended her life substantially. At about 85 years of age, she started eating gluten occasionally. Part of her gluten consumption is wilful. She sees something that she thinks she might enjoy eating, and she requests a serving. Perhaps because of mom’s lapses into gluten, the staff at the home where she now lives have also become quite cavalier about her gluten free diet. They frequently serve her dishes that contain gluten. Still, her weight has remained fairly stable. My mom is not the only example of weight loss on a gluten free diet. There are other stories on the Internet. Just Google “gluten free weight loss diet” and you will see what I mean. But I can’t vouch for those stories. I didn’t observe their weight loss. All I saw was my mom’s. Currently, there are only a few formal studies that have explored body mass changes on a gluten free diet. One conducted in Ireland reveals that there are eight times as many overweight celiacs as underweight celiacs (Dickey & Kearney). That is quite surprising in light of the common perspective that celiac disease is one of under-nutrition, suggesting that underweight should be a more likely sign of celiac disease. For a long time, that was the dominant belief, but there is clearly a flaw in this paradigm. Suspecting celiac disease only in underweight patients is not the only complication of this issue. Dickey and Kearney also report that after two years of dietary compliance, eighty two percent of their 143 overweight and obese patients with celiac disease had gained yet more weight on a gluten free diet. This would seem to suggest that the gluten free diet is not a good bet as a weight loss tool. However, these results do not seem to have been replicated by other investigators. Another follow-up study, conducted in New Rochelle, NY, reports that ’’ 66% of those who were underweight gained weight, whereas 54% of overweight and 47% of obese patients lost weight’’ on a gluten free diet (Cheng et al ). Thus, on this side of the Atlantic, of the eighty one overweight and obese celiac subjects, about half lost weight following a gluten free diet. That is quite different from the findings in Ireland. Another, much smaller study of childhood celiac disease revealed that about half of the eight overweight children they studied also experienced weight loss (Venkatasubramani et al ). This research was conducted in Milwaukee and is congruent with the findings from New Rochelle. So, on this side of the Atlantic, about half of the overweight celiac patients studied experienced weight loss on a gluten free diet. Perhaps these differences are the result of variations between the versions of the gluten free diet in North America, as compared with the diet in the United Kingdom. The primary difference I am aware of is that gluten free in the UK includes wheat starch whereas most American organizations do not accept wheat starch as gluten free. However, the gluten free diet that includes wheat starch has been shown to reduce cancer risk and many other celiac-associated risk factors, and has therefore been deemed safe. Nonetheless, that same wheat starch may be a factor in the different body mass findings between Ireland and the USA. Or maybe the difference lies in variations in research methods. Without further research, it is difficult to guess.... and that is exactly what we would be doing. Without solid evidence, our beliefs are no more than just guesses. For instance, my mom’s weight loss could have been the result of some factor other than her gluten free diet. Perhaps the beginning of her weight loss just happened to coincide with when she started the gluten-free diet. I’m convinced by my observations of her experience, but that doesn’t mean that you should be. After all, I could be kidding myself. Or her weight loss could have been caused by some other factor that I’m not even aware of or recognizing. That is why many of us contribute our hard-earned dollars to research. We need something more than stories about my mom’s experiences. We need solid, peer reviewed research such as what is found in medical journals. However, even there we need to be cautious about reported findings. One good indicator that researchers are on the right track is when we see a convergence of results from very different studies. When one study produces a given result, and another study produces a similar result despite very different study designs and objectives, the results of the first study are said to have been replicated by the second study. The advantage, in the case of celiac patients experiencing weight loss following institution of a gluten free diet clearly goes to the two studies conducted in the USA. The studies looked at two different sub-populations of celiac patients yet produced approximately the same results. But both studies still have a problem with selection bias. One of the greatest difficulties in assessing research findings is that we are really just assuming that what we see in one or two small groups will be reflected in the general population. This is why, where possible, study subjects are picked randomly from the general population. However, this cannot happen in studies of celiac patients. They are a select group. This is partly because these subjects have celiac disease and partly because they have a diagnosis of celiac disease. I’m really not splitting hairs here. Please bear with me for a moment as I try to explain this important distinction. Unlike more than 95% of Americans with celiac disease, these study subjects have a diagnosis. And don’t be fooled. Clinicians are missing almost as many cases of celiac disease in Europe as they are in the USA. Thus, all three of these studies are looking at a sub-group (diagnosed with celiac disease) of a select group (celiac disease). And the lengthy delays to diagnosis, somewhere between five and eleven years, also occur in Europe and Canada, so the difference is probably not dependent on whether there is a socialist medical system in place, as some have suggested. The select group is formed by people with celiac disease. The sub-group is people drawn from the three to five percent of those who have been diagnosed with celiac disease. We know some of the ways that those with celiac disease differ from the general population. But we don’t know any of the ways, beyond the diagnostic criteria, that people with undiagnosed celiac disease differ from the general population or from the population of people whose celiac disease has been diagnosed. Studying a small sub-group of celiac patients who have a diagnosis, then assuming that the features observed will be present in all those with celiac disease, whether they have a diagnosis or not, is a flawed approach. Statisticians call this mistake ‘selection bias’. It is a well recognized type of statistical error. For instance, if you wanted to predict the buying habits of people living in Pennsylvania, you would not just observe members of the Amish community. Doing so would not only induce a selection bias, it would lead to very misleading information about the general population of Pennsylvania. While many Amish live in Pennsylvania, their buying habits probably do not reflect the buying habits of most people in Pennsylvania. Similarly, the selection bias driven by extrapolating from observations of sub-groups of people with diagnosed celiac disease and applying those principles to undiagnosed celiacs, leading us to either assume that weight loss will or will not occur on a gluten free diet is mistaken and likely to produce misleading information. In addition to selection bias, sample size is another important factor in predicting features of a larger population based on observations of a sub-population. The smaller the group, the less likely it is to reflect the variations present in the larger population of those with celiac disease. For instance, if the US population is currently about 311 million, and the rate of celiac disease is about one in every 133 people, then there should be about 2.3 million Americans with celiac disease. Only three to five percent of Americans with celiac disease are thought to be diagnosed with celiac disease. And the studies of overweight celiacs who gained or lost weight on a gluten free diet include about 89 Americans and 143 Irish people. Is it credible to imagine that we can predict the responses of 2.3 million Americans based on observations of a sub-group of 89 of their compatriots and 143 Europeans? I think that most readers will agree that leaping to such conclusions is unreasonable. Yet that is what we do if we insist on the exclusive correctness of either side of the question of whether the gluten free diet is an effective weight loss tool. I am convinced, both by my observations of my mom, and by the results of these two small studies, that some celiacs will lose weight on a gluten free diet. However, I would not presume to insist that it is the best, or even a good tool for all overweight celiacs. Neither would I insist it was a good weight loss tool for all diagnosed overweight celiacs. Given the US studies, that is clearly not the case. Equally, denial of anecdotal reports or the two US studies claiming that the gluten free diet is not an effective weight loss tool for anyone is also unreasonable. We can only say, with confidence, that these study results may apply to those who are diagnosed with celiac disease. Yet we have a fairly even split, with American researchers showing that about half of overweight celiacs lose weight on a gluten free diet, and Irish researchers asserting that eighty two diagnosed overweight celiacs gained even more weight on a gluten free diet. Yet these statistical problems are not insurmountable. If a group of researchers conducted random screening blood tests for celiac disease in a variety of settings and circumstances, confirmed the celiac diagnosis in a large group of these individuals, and followed up with those who were overweight and undertook the gluten free diet, then their observations might reasonably be applied to the celiac population in general, whether diagnosed or undiagnosed. There would still be a relatively minor statistical error induced by cases of sero-negative celiac disease, but the statistical problems would not be anywhere near as problematic as asserting that any or all of these three studies tell us much about weight loss on a gluten free diet, except that it sometimes happens in small sub-groups of diagnosed celiac patients. Since such research has not been conducted, it behooves all of us to take a moderate stance on either side of this debate. That does not mean that we can’t or shouldn’t make use of the available information. Each of us can draw our own conclusions based on our interpretations of the available data. If you believe that, in North America, a gluten free diet can induce weight loss in about half of overweight, newly diagnosed celiac patients, it does seem reasonable to suggest that the gluten free diet may be all that is needed for some diagnosed celiacs to lose weight. However, since we are missing more than 95% of cases of celiac disease, it is difficult to say whether it will help those undiagnosed, overweight celiacs to lose weight. Nonetheless, it is possible. Thus, if it will help some, perhaps about half of them to lose weight, those individuals might well consider this information, limited though it may be, very valuable. Anecdotal reports, such as my mother’s story, might also be considered very valuable by those who can lose weight on a gluten free diet. For those who do not lose weight on this diet, I suspect that many of them have walked the path my mother did, and it won’t be the first time that a diet failed to work for them. This, of course, raises the question of why some individuals and organizations have vigorously opposed and decried anecdotal claims that a gluten free diet may help some people lose weight. Clearly, there is hard scientific evidence to support this claim. The reverse is not the case. Nobody has, or can, prove that the gluten free diet is always ineffective at helping people lose weight. Meanwhile, we can hope for more research that will answer some of the many questions that arise from this relatively new information that there may be many more overweight people with celiac disease than there are underweight people with celiac disease. Several of the questions that remain include: What causes overweight and obesity in patients with celiac disease? It is, after all, a disease that is characterized by inadequate absorption of nutrients from the food that passes through the gastrointestinal tract. I have previously suggested that specific nutrient deficiencies may induce food cravings that cause some to continue to eat despite feeling ’’full’’ because their bodies continue to demand these missing nutrients. The new field of metabonomic research may soon shed more light on this area. It has already demonstrated that subjects diagnosed with celiac disease are not as efficient at metabolizing glucose (usually derived from carbohydrates) as those without celiac disease. Does wheat starch have any impact on nutrient absorption or appetite? If even small amounts of opioid peptides survive in wheat starch and are allowed access to the bloodstream and brain, they may well have an impact on appetite. Opioids or some other component of wheat starch might also alter ghrelin (a hormone that incites appetite) and/or leptin (a hormone that suppresses appetite). We just don’t know. Are there other dietary differences between Ireland and the USA? We are aware of the difference in wheat starch, but what other factors might contribute to these divergent research results? How does wheat starch compare with the 20 parts per million currently being put forward as the labelling standard for American legislation in the offing? Does wheat starch contain 20 ppm? Will the legislation in question change conditions for celiac patients? Just how much contamination from gluten grains is present in commercial oats? Even in the absence of contamination, how many people with diagnosed celiac disease experience cross-reactions with oats? This is where the selective antibodies are sensitized to protein segments found in oats as well as in gluten grains. What other differences between Ireland and the USA might explain these variations in research findings? Could variations in sunlight, or water-borne minerals, or even genetics contribute to the difference in findings? How representative are these groups of other groups of celiac patients? Do they reflect what is going on among all the other diagnosed celiacs in their region? And how do these findings apply to the undiagnosed celiacs? Is region a genuine factor in all of this? I remember when many researchers were quite willing to believe that there was some difference that had Italy showing a rate of celiac disease of one in 250 while in the USA and Canada it was thought to afflict about one in twelve thousand. We now know that was silly, but at the time, there were a lot of apparently intelligent people who were vigorously asserting the accuracy of those variations and postulating many creative explanations for them. I remember one, now prominent celiac researcher, admonishing me not to take the Italian findings too seriously. He was very confident that they represented a large overestimation of the true incidence of celiac disease in Italy and could not reasonably be suggested as reflecting anything about Canada or the USA. Now here is a really startling thought. Some of the overweight people with non-celiac gluten sensitivity might also be able to lose weight on a gluten free diet. If so, this could produce as much as a ten-fold increase in the number of people who might lose weight on our diet. Has anyone tested obese and overweight people for anti-gliadin antibodies? Could gliadin be a factor in some peoples’ weight problems? I wonder how many people might be helped to lose weight if pre-conceived notions about the gluten free diet could be relinquished in favour of a more open minded view.... one that recognizes that there is some evidence that some people can and do lose weight on a gluten free diet? The dogmatic certitude that abounds on the question of weight loss through the gluten free diet is profound and disturbing. As is pointed out by nutritionist, Brian Dean, in his article on gluten and heart disease in this issue of The Journal of Gluten Sensitivity, one long-standing dietary sacred cow has been killed. We now know that eating saturated fats is not a causal factor in heart disease. Equally, the emerging sacred cow that a gluten-free diet is not appropriate for weight loss is, as yet, supported only by flimsy evidence, all of which is contradicted by other research. So let’s avoid making rigid pronouncements about the gluten free diet until we have a better understanding of the complex and perplexing causes of obesity and overweight in the context of untreated celiac disease. And please, let’s remember that some people can and do lose weight on a gluten-free diet alone. My mother is an excellent but by no means unique example. Others have similar stories. My own experience on the diet was weight gain, and now I have to work at keeping from gaining any more. Only those who know all there is to know should speak in absolutes. The rest of us should constrain ourselves to offering opinions and perspectives. Sources: Hasselbeck E, The Gluten-Free Diet: A Gluten-Free Survival Guide. Center Street- Hatchette Book Group, NY, 2009. http://glutenfreegoddess.blogspot.com/2009/05/gluten-free-diet-opinion-from-elaine-monarch.html Dickey W, Kearney N. Overweight in celiac disease: prevalence, clinical characteristics, and effect of a gluten-free diet. Am J Gastroenterol. 2006 Oct;101(10):2356-9. Cheng J, Brar PS, Lee AR, Green PH. Body mass index in celiac disease: beneficial effect of a gluten-free diet. J Clin Gastroenterol. 2010 Apr;44(4):267-71. Venkatasubramani N, Telega G, Werlin SL. Obesity in pediatric celiac disease. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2010 Sep;51(3):295-7.
  4. Celiac.com 07/06/2017 - Each New Year you will find a plethora of articles on weight loss. Unfortunately, for those with celiac disease, weight loss is not always an issue, but for some the opposite is true. Though much false information in the medical community remains, such as "you must be underweight to have celiac disease", there are many who are overweight. Whether you want to gain or lose weight, they have one thing in common, the need for nutritious food, and food that does not cause inflammation in the body. If you look at autoimmune diseases, in general, you will notice they have one thing in common, inflammation. Celiac disease – inflammation of the small intestines; multiple sclerosis – inflammation of the central nervous system, Grave's disease – inflammation of the thyroid gland; arthritis – inflammation of the joint tissues and cartilage; Crohn's disease – inflammation of the digestive tract; Alzheimer's disease – inflammation of the brain; transverse myelitis – inflammation of the spinal cord; etc. When we consume foods that we are either allergic to or sensitive to, our white blood cells release toxic chemicals to fight off what it perceives as foreign bodies resulting in inflammation. If our bodies are too busy fighting off inflammation from a non-optimal diet or stress, they do not have enough resources to fight the real bad guys. Some of the foods known to fight or prevent inflammation are spices such as turmeric, curry, cinnamon, ginger, and garlic; tropical fruit such as coconut, pineapple (contains a natural antihistamine), and papaya; green tea; fish oil and fish; and a wide variety of colorful vegetables such as spinach, kale, broccoli, cauliflower, kelp, red peppers, sweet potatoes, and cabbage. Research shows that omega-3's are not only known to reduce inflammation, but it may lower the risk of chronic diseases such as arthritis, cancer and heart disease(1). Because our bodies cannot make omega-3 fatty acids we must obtain them from food or supplements. If your doctor has recommended that you take an omega-3 supplement or increase omega-3 in your diet, it is important that you know the two main types. Omega-3's which are marine-based (fish and fish oil) contain EPA and DHA, where the other contains ALA. ALA omega-3 may be obtained from soybean, canola, and flax seed oils, ground flax seed, and walnuts, as well as kale, spinach, Brussels sprouts, and leafy greens. Though our body does not make omega-3's, it does partially convert ALA to DHA and EPA. Per Harvard School of Public Health, we do not know which, if either, is more beneficial (2,3). Research does show that EPA and DHA do reduce the risk of heart disease in older adults.(4) When ALA is added to our diet it is known to reduce the risk of breast cancer and prostate cancer, as it helps your body metabolize estrogens into a safer form. You may already be aware of the fact that aloe vera contains a gel-like substance that is known to heal. (As a side note, aloe vera products sometimes contain laytex.) Flax seeds contain the same property. It is also high in omega-3, though yellow flax seeds are lower. Brown flax seeds have the most health benefits. Another popular superfood is chia seeds. It does not contain the same properties as flax, however, chia seeds provide similar benefits as flax, and they do not need to be ground in order to reap those benefits. Chia benefits include fiber, calcium, antioxidants, protein, and more. Fiber is known to make one feel full, however, both flax and chia seeds absorb quite a bit of liquid, creating the feeling of fullness for a longer period of time than many other fibers. This is a great and healthy way to lose weight. A misconception about losing weight is to skip meals. When you do this it throws your blood sugar levels out of whack. Some believe this results in weight gain, or at least in no loss. Minimally, it is unhealthy. What does make sense is that if you eat more often such as 4 – 5 times a day, and on a regular schedule, your blood sugar levels maintain balance and your body recognizes that it will receive more food soon, which may prevent it from going into a starvation mode, storing fat. The bottom line is always calorie intake, though. Choose wisely, and avoid the use of refined sugar and artificial sweeteners, as this increases acidity in the body, resulting in inflammation. When chronic inflammation is present in the body it depresses the immune system and creates disease, even tumors.(2) Inflammation really is the precursor to disease. For those with celiac disease needing to gain weight, note that it may take several months to up to a year before your gut is healed enough to absorb nutrients properly. Meanwhile, check the ingredients and foods that you consume to ensure they are truly gluten-free. Due to the lack of labeling laws in the U.S., a food labeled gluten-free may still contain a small amount of gluten. Consume a high calorie diet with healthy fats such as avocado,coconut oil, high calorie nuts such as walnuts and pecans, nut butters, and if dairy-tolerant, cream cheese. Add avocado to your sandwiches, healthy oil to protein shakes and smoothies; consume high carbohydrates such as potatoes; and snack between meals. Individuals who need to avoid dairy may find it difficult at times. There are a number of gluten-free, dairy-free substitutes on the market now. If you are soy and corn intolerant, as well, you may find it difficult to find a dairy-free substitute for butter. A small percentage of dairy intolerant individuals may tolerate goat's milk; and some even tolerate ghee (clarified butter). Because a minute amount of dairy protein may remain in ghee, and because goat's milk is considered dairy, it is best to be tested for food allergies if you suspect a dairy allergy, prior to consuming the above. Previous studies on food allergies focused on antibodies (proteins that attack foreign substances and sometimes even food) found in the blood. In a preliminary study performed by the University of Osio, Norway, it was discovered that food-related antibodies may end up in the gut. When the body mistakes a food for a foreign matter, it creates IgE antibodies (Immunoglobin E), which creates a chain reaction of symptoms. Though the study was performed on those with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), in the participants' intestinal fluid they found antibodies to the following foods: cow's milk, hen, cereal, eggs, codfish, and pork, at higher levels than in non-RA patients.(5) Similar results may be found in those with celiac disease or gluten intolerance, even the general population. We will not know until additional studies are performed. It is definitely food for thought. If you have any type of unexplained symptoms, that medical professionals have not been able to diagnose, consider being tested for other food intolerances or allergies, besides gluten. Consuming foods that cause your immune system to react will only create additional inflammation. There has been much talk that many individuals have had positive results from using Cyrex Labs. You cannot do these tests by mail, as someone must draw your blood. However Cyrex Labs has a list of doctors who will provide this service. If you are not quite sure what you are allergic or sensitive to, another option to consider is an allergy elimination diet. For one month eat only meat, fish, fruit, vegetables, basically a caveman diet, quite a bit stricter than the Paleo Diet. (Definitely check with your doctor first.) Then introduce one food at a time back into your diet. Note that food allergy reactions may be immediate or within a couple of days, where a sensitivity may take longer to show up.(6) This is also a great way to lose weight. If you are new to the gluten-free diet, make sure to introduce new foods, especially gluten free grains, one at the time. Consume the item a few times within a couple of days and wait for 2-4 days and take note whether you have a reaction to it. The reaction may be as complicated as hives, dermatitis herpetiformis, or digestive issues; or as simple as a bad night's sleep or slight bloating. Note that some people may not present any symptoms, even to gluten, and still have celiac disease. The above is referenced for food allergies and sensitivities only. The best advice for anyone who is gluten intolerant is to strictly adhere to the gluten-free diet. One study shows that only 52.1% of those with celiac disease adhere to a gluten-free diet.(7) What will your New Year's resolution be now? References: 1. Omega-3 Fatty Acids University of Maryland Medical System http://www.umm.edu/altmed/articles/omrga-3-000316.htm (Accessed December 6, 2012). 2. Inflammation http://www.arizonaadvancedmedicine.com/articles/inflammation.html (Accessed December 7, 2012). 3. The Nutrition Source, Ask the Expert: Omega-2 Fatty Acids Harvard School of Public Health http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/questions/omega-3/index.html (Accessed December 6, 2012). 4. Circulating long-chain w-3 fatty acids and incidence of congestive heart failure in older adults: the cardiovascular health study: a cohort study. PubMed http://www.ncbi.nlm.nigh.gov/pubmed/21810709 (Accessed December 6, 2012). 5. Denise Lynn Mann Rheumatoid Arthritis Diet: RA and Food Allergies http://www.arthritistoday.org/conditions/rheumatoid-arthritis/nutrition-and-ra/ra-food-allergies.php (Accessed December 7, 2012). 6. Dr. Jonathan Brostoff, M.D. Food Allergies and Food Intolerance: The Complete Guide to Their Identification and Treatment (2000) 7. Talluri SK, Besur S, Talluri J, Department of Internal Medicine, McLaren-MSU Internal Medicine Residency Program, Flint, MI - A Population-Based Survey of Celiac Disease in the United States http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/events/2012nchs/poster_abstracts.htm#abstract74 (Accessed December 7, 2012).
  5. Celiac.com 04/18/2017 - Even though gluten-free diets are more popular than ever, researchers still don't have much good data on gluten intake and long-term health. A team of researchers recently set out to assess three large cohort studies, the Nurses' Health Study (NHS, n=69,276), the NHSII (n=88,610), and the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study (HPFS, n=41,908), and to estimate gluten intake using a validated food-frequency questionnaire collected every 2-4 years. The research team included Geng Zong, of the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA; Benjamin Lebwohl, Celiac Disease Center, Department of Medicine, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY; Frank Hu, Laura Sampson, Lauren Dougherty, Walter Willett, Andrew Chan, and Qi Sun, of the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health in Boston, MA. The team defined incidental Type 2 diabetes as physician diagnosed diabetes, and confirmed with supplementary information. Their results showed that average gluten intake, give or take standard deviation, was 5.83±2.23, 6.77±2.50, and 7.06±2.76 grams/day in NHS, NHSII, and HPFS, respectively. That gluten intake cam, mainly from carbohydrate sources, especially refined grains, starch, and cereal fiber (Spearman correlation coefficients > 0.6). The team confirmed 15,947 Type 2 diabetes cases over 4.24 million years of follow-up time. In all three groups, the team observed an inverse connection between gluten consumption and Type 2 diabetes risk. The multivariate adjustment (table), and hazard ratio (HR, 95% confidence intervals [95%CI]) comparing extreme quintiles were 0.80 (0.76, 0.84; P<0.001). The connection dissipated slightly after adjusting for cereal fiber (HR [95%CI]= 0.87 [0.81, 0.93]), but not for other carbohydrate components. For study participants under 65 years of age, and without major chronic diseases, changes in gluten intake were not associated with weight gain in multivariate adjusted model. Overall, the 4-year weight change (95%CI) was 0.08 (-0.06, 0.22; P=0.25) in NHS, -0.05 (-0.18, 0.08; P=0.43) in NHSII, and 0.36 (-0.24, 0.96; P=0.24) HPFS for each 5 grams increase in gluten intake. These findings suggest that gluten intake likely doesn't cause or promote Type 2 diabetes or excess weight gain. Reducing dietary gluten is unlikely to help prevent Type 2 diabetes, and may actually reduce consumption of cereal fiber or whole grains that help to lower overall diabetes risk. Source: AHA EPI
  6. I was diagnosed with celiac disease just over 2 months ago. TTG came back positive(32) and Marsh I on endoscopy. March 25th I started the gluten-free diet and believe that I haven't eaten gluten since. I've tried to be very strict, watch cross-contamination, and read lots and lots of articles to avoid possible "hidden" forms of gluten. Now I know that none of you are doctors but I was wondering if anyone had a similar experience that might be a help to me. I am 27 years old, 6' 2" and have weighed about 137 pounds since I was 16. In the last 11 years, the absolute lowest I've seen my weight is 135, the max is 140. I was hoping to gain weight now that I got off gluten and hopefully healing that digestive tract. I was a little bit disappointed when I hopped on the scale a month and a half into the diet and I weighed 133 pounds. I had lost about 4 pounds. But I didn't think anything of it until yesterday(2 months and a week into the diet) and I weighed 130 pounds. I've lost 7 pounds in the last 2 months, which may not sound like a lot but 130 pounds for a 6' 2" guy is pretty skinny and I'm worried that I might lose more. I've heard of people losing weight because of celiac(and I assume that's why I've always been really skinny), but I've not heard of people losing weight after starting the gluten-free diet. Also, my stomach still will often feel achy right under the ribs, and feel full. And the fatigue, "brain fog," and muscle weakness haven't gone away yet either. Any thoughts? Thanks.
  7. Celiac.com 05/18/2016 - Common clinical wisdom, and some data, indicate that patients with celiac disease are likely to be underweight. However, data from west suggest that anywhere from 8% to 40% of celiac patients can be overweight or obese. What about normal weight? Can people with celiac disease also have normal body weight? A research team recently set out to determine if people with celiac disease can be normal weight. The research team included I Singh, A Agnihotri, A Sharma, AK Verma, P Das, B Thakur, V Sreenivas, SD Gupta, V Ahuja, and GK Makharia. They are variously affiliated with the Department of Gastroenterology and Human Nutrition, the Department of Pathology, the Department of Biostatistics, and the Department of Gastroenterology and Human Nutrition at the All India Institute of Medical Sciences in Ansari Nagar in New Delhi, India. To answer that question, a team of researchers recently reviewed data on body mass index (BMI) of patients with celiac disease so they could correlate BMI with other celiac characteristics. For their retrospective study, the team reviewed case records of 210 adolescent and adult celiac patients who were seen at the team's Celiac Disease Clinic. To classify BMI as underweight, normal weight, overweight, or obese, they used the Consensus Statement for Diagnosis of Obesity, Abdominal Obesity and the Metabolic Syndrome for Asian Indians for those with age >18 years and revised Indian Association of Pediatrics BMI-for-age charts for those between 12 and 18 years. Their results showed that, of 210 patients, 115 patients were normal weight, while 76 patients were underweight, 13 were overweight, and 6 were obese. There was no difference in the proportion of underweight between male and female patients with celiac disease. The mean age of underweight patients was similar to those who were normal or overweight. Regardless of weight, there was no difference between any of the patients in terms of average duration of symptoms; frequencies of diarrhea, anorexia, and weakness; anemia; titer of anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody; and severity of villous atrophy in those with underweight or normal weight or overweight. Of the celiac disease patients in this clinic, only one third of patients with celiac disease actually had low BMI. More than half had normal BMI, while the rest were either overweight or obese. Physicians should not discount the possibility of celiac disease based solely on BMI. Patients with normal and high BMI can also have celiac disease. Source: Indian J Gastroenterol. 2016 Jan;35(1):20-4. doi: 10.1007/s12664-016-0620-9. Epub 2016 Feb 18.
  8. Celiac.com 02/05/2016 - Oprah Winfrey may have just officially pardoned gluten, and her "glorious revelation that bread is okay" is causing a big stir. When Oprah Winfrey speaks, people listen. That's why it was a big deal a while back when Oprah started a book club: People bought the books she featured. Lots of people. That's why it's such a big deal when the famous television producer and talk show diva sings the praises of gluten in a recent Tweet about the virtues of bread. According to Winfrey, who Tweeted an ad for Weight Watchers, she eats bread every day, but still managed to lose weight. Moreover, she doesn't just eat bread and lose weight, she loves bread. She heaps high praise upon it. Oprah's Tweet contains a video that reiterates her deep love of bread. Oprah's Tweet read, in part: "Eat bread. Lose weight. Whaaatttt? #ComeJoinMe" Find more Tweets from Oprah on Twitter. Winfrey, of course, owns 6.4 million shares of Weight Watchers, whose stock prices have skyrocketed. The New York Daily News has called this a "$20 million Tweet." Read more in Salon's interview with health-sciences researcher Timothy Caulfield. So, will Oprah help make bread cool again? Only time will tell. Of course, for people with celiac disease and gluten-intolerance, bread will never be cool again, but that's another story.
  9. Celiac.com 08/18/2014 - A team of researchers recently set out to better understand the effects of gluten-free diets on obesity. The research team included F.L. Soares, R. Matoso de Oliveira, L.G. Teixeira, Z. Menezes, S.S. Pereira, A.C. Alves, N.V. Batista, A.M. de Faria, D.C. Cara, A.V. Ferreira, and J.I. Alvarez-Leite. They are affiliated with the Departamento de Alimentos, Faculdade de Farmácia, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. Specifically, the team wanted to determine whether a gluten-free diet can prevent the expansion of adipose tissue, and its consequences. For their study, the team fed C57BL/6 mice a high-fat diet containing either 4.5% gluten (Control) or no gluten (gluten-free). They noted body weight and adiposity gains, leukocyte rolling and adhesion, macrophage infiltration and cytokine production in adipose tissue. The team measured blood lipid profiles, glycaemia, insulin resistance and adipokines. They also assessed the expression of the PPAR-α and γ, lipoprotein lipase (LPL), hormone sensitive lipase (HSL), carnitine palmitoyl acyltransferase-1 (CPT-1), insulin receptor, GLUT-4 and adipokines in epidydimal fat. Gluten-free animals showed less body weight and adipose gain, with no changes in food intake or lipid excretion. These results were associated with up-regulation of PPAR-α, LPL, HSL and CPT-1, which are related to lipolysis and fatty acid oxidation. The team also saw improved glucose regulation, and pro-inflammatory profile-related over-expression of PPAR-γ. Intravital microscopy revealed a lower number of adhered cells in the adipose tissue microvasculature. The over-expression of PPAR-γ is related to the increase of adiponectin and GLUT-4. The results of this study suggest that gluten-free diets can be helpful in reducing fat gain, inflammation and insulin resistance. They suggest that a gluten-free diet should be tested as a way of preventing the development of obesity and metabolic disorders. Source: J Nutr Biochem. 2013 Jun;24(6):1105-11. doi: 10.1016/j.jnutbio.2012.08.009. Epub 2012 Dec 17.
  10. If you're like me, you are excited about the upcoming holiday season, but also a little anxious about it. No, not the shopping part...the eating part! Each year I step on the scale and wish I had done something to better prepare my body for the additional calories that are to come during November and December. Well this time I did do something. I just completed the GetFit Gluten Free 7-Day Weight Loss Program. This weight loss program is easy and convenient. All you do is go onto their website, create an account, select the meals you want for breakfast, lunch, and dinner, then pay with a credit card. Within a couple of days you will have delicious, healthy, pre-cooked meals delivered to your doorstep. There is no need for calorie counting, no mixing powder with liquids, no cooking, and best of all: no doing dishes! Along with the food, you get a handy "how to" guide, which gives suggestions on what to drink with your meals, how often you should exercise, and other helpful tips. This company "gets it" when it comes to healthy eating, and they sincerely want you to succeed with your weight loss goals, whatever they are. The average weight loss using their program is 4-5 pounds or more a week, and if you have more than that to lose simply do the program for 2 to 3 weeks longer, or even a month. The price is reasonable, and there are no sugars/high fructose corn syrup, soy, or artificial anything in this food, and their customer service department rocks. A few hours after I ordered I received a phone call welcoming me as a new customer. What other company does that? None I know of. Mind blown. Don't waste another minute fooling around with anything else. For more info visit: http://Freshly.com. Review written by Patricia Seeley.
  11. Celiac.com 11/27/2013 - After dropping 10 pounds over the summer, Miami Heat shooting guard Ray Allen is touting the benefits of his gluten-free, Paleo diet. The 6-foot-5 Allen, who enters the 2013-2014 NBA season at his former college weight of 197 pounds, says that weight loss was not his goal when he embarked on the gluten-free diet. At 38, Allen stresses the importance quick recovery from rigorous training sessions and NBA games. His gluten-free Paleo eating plan emphasizes high-quality animal protein, fat (including healthy saturated fats), vegetables and fruits, and excludes sugar, gluten, dairy, legumes, starches, alcohol and processed foods. Allen told the Miami Herald that "Recovery...is so much more important now that I’ve gotten older. I’ve learned how to manage my body from an eating standpoint. And I’ve always done it, but now I realize there’s another level." He adds that he's "always prided myself in coming back in great shape, burning myself out conditioning-wise, running the treadmill, riding my bike, finding different ways to push…never have I added the nutrition part of this." Even though he is seems to be benefiting from his diet, Allen clearly still misses some favorite foods. "I haven’t had a pizza at all this year, so I miss it," he said. "This past week, I just added pancakes back into my routine because I can’t go through a season without carbs." Hopefully, those are gluten-free pancakes! At any rate, it's interesting to see gluten-free diets get such praise from professional athletes. It will be interesting to see what the science has to say about the situation, once we can get some solid data. What do you think? Can avoiding gluten improve athletic performance? Or is there something else going on? Share your commons below. Source: http://www.examiner.com/article/miami-heat-guard-ray-allen-lost-10-lbs-on-gluten-free-paleo-diet
  12. Celiac.com 06/12/2013 - Pregnant women with higher levels of issue transglutaminase (anti-tTG), an antibody common in people with celiac disease, at risk for low fetal and birth weight in their babies, according to a new study in Gastroenterology. A number of studies before this one have confirmed an association between celiac disease and poor growth fetus growth, but very little study had been done as to how the level of celiac disease might affect fetal growth, birth weight or birth outcome. In an effort to better understand how the level of celiac disease affects fetal growth, birth weight, and birth outcome, a team of researchers set out to assess the associations between levels of antibodies against tissue transglutaminase (anti-tTG, a celiac disease marker) and fetal growth and birth outcomes for pregnant women. The research team included J.C. Kiefte-de Jong, V.W. Jaddoe, A.G. Uitterlinden, E. A. Steegers, S.P. Willemsen, A. Hofman, H.Hooijkaas, and H.A. Moll of the Generation R Study Group at Erasmus University Medical Center in Rotterdam, The Netherlands. They conducted a population-based prospective birth cohort study of 7046 pregnant women. Serum samples were collected during the second trimester of pregnancy and analyzed for levels of anti-tTG. Based on these levels, they grouped each woman into groups of negative anti-tTG (≤0.79 U/mL; n = 6702), intermediate anti-tTG (0.8 to ≤6 U/mL; n = 308), or high anti-tTG individuals (over 6 U/mL; n = 36). They then collected data for fetal growth and birth outcomes from ultrasound measurements and medical records. The fetal growth data showed that, on average, fetuses of women in the positive anti-tTG group were 16 g lighter than those of women in the negative anti-tTG group (95% confidence interval [CI], -32 to -1 g) during the second trimester and weighed 74 g less (95% CI, -140 to -8 g) during the third trimester. The birth outcome data revealed that newborns of women in the intermediate and positive anti-tTG groups weighed 53 g (95% CI, -106 to -1 g) and 159 g (95% CI, -316 to -1 g) less at birth, respectively, than those of women in the negative anti-tTG group. Of mothers in the intermediate anti-tTG group, those with HLA-DQ2 or -DQ8 had reduced birth weights that were double those of mothers without HLA-DQ2 or -DQ8. This study led the researchers to conclude that levels of anti-tTG in pregnant women are inversely associated with fetal growth. The higher the anti-tTG in women, the lower the birth weights of their babies. So, women with the highest levels of anti-tTG (over 6 U/mL) saw the greatest reduction in birth weight of their babies. Also, women with intermediate levels of anti-tTG (0.8 to ≤6 U/mL) saw lower birth weights that were even further reduced if they carried the HLA-DQ2 and -DQ8 gene markers. Source: Gastroenterology. 2013 Apr;144(4):726-735.e2. doi: 10.1053/j.gastro.2013.01.003.
  13. This article originally appeared in the Autumn 2002 edition of Celiac.com's Journal of Gluten-Sensitivity. Celiac.com 11/08/2011 - Are you a bit overweight? If you wear the same two outfits all the time because nothing else in your closet fits, you may be a prime candidate for a “Low Calorie” Gluten-free regimen. The key to any weight reduction program is to concentrate on eating healthy instead of counting calories. The more you concentrate on reducing your intake of fats, cholesterol and sugar, the more weight you will ultimately lose. Beware of “fat free” foods; they often contain large amounts of salt and/or sugar. Below are some hints to help you stick to a sensible diet: Eat what you like (within reason)…just eat smaller portions and prepare it with fewer calories. You won’t stick to your new program if you are forced to eat foods you don’t like. (Use some common sense with this step. Eating smaller portions does not refer to smaller portions of butter-whipped potatoes and chocolate cream pie!) Forget the grapefruit diet! There is no need to starve yourself or go on crash diets. Food group elimination diets may deprive your body of necessary vitamins and minerals and affect your health after a period of time, and usually you will put the weight right back on when you start to eat “normally” again. It is far better to lose the weight with a sensible, well-rounded diet, over a period of time. Eat as many different foods as possible to assure that you are getting a full range of nutrients. Train yourself to sit and enjoy your meal, preferably taking at least 20 minutes to relax over your meal. Never eat at the counter standing up; never walk out the door holding a sandwich or snack in your hand; and, when you clear the dishes from the table, NEVER finish up what someone else has left on their dish. Remember…what you eat in private shows in public! Serve meals attractively; garnish your plates. A pretty plate presentation will make even plain foods look appetizing. Before eating something, ask yourself, Are you really hungry or are you just bored? If you are just bored try chewing a piece of gluten-free sugarless gum and take a walk around the block. Don’t skip meals. Skipped meals often lead to an out-of-control appetite before your next mealtime, and may wreak havoc on your blood sugar levels. If you get really hungry between meals, snack on healthy, low calorie snacks (carrot sticks, plain popcorn, or some raisins). Skip the “extras”: Don’t put butter on your bread; butter doesn’t fill you—it just adds calories and fat. Eliminate sugar in your cereal, coffee or tea. If you are eating French fries (oven-baked instead of deep fried), skip the ketchup. Put away the steak sauce and tartar sauce; when the gravy boat is passed to you pass it on to someone else (who’s not on a diet!). Cutting out the “extras” will significantly reduce your total caloric intake. Eat foods with adequate starch and fiber. Your body needs these so be sure to eat three servings of vegetables and two servings of fruit each day to keep you healthy inside. Do not confuse natural starch (potatoes, corn, brown rice) with processed starch (pasta, breads). Natural starch is healthier for you and provides your body with energy. Processed starch will slowly convert to sugar in your system, and allow it to absorb more sugar—and no one needs this! The key to better health is to maintain a healthy, reduced calorie diet that includes the least possible amount of processed foods. Instead of the apple pie, eat just the apple!Beware of focusing only on eating “fat free” foods. Shrimp has very little fat or calories, but it is higher in bad cholesterol than many other foods. A “fat free” dinner may have excessive amounts of sugar which can be just as bad for your diet as fats. A “fat free” dinner may have excessive amounts of salt, which can also be unhealthy. Beware of focusing only on your total caloric intake. If you just count calories, you could eat several pieces of candy per day but would have to avoid all other foods. Obviously the candy will not give your body the nutrients it needs, even though you are within your calorie limitations. While caloric intake is a consideration, other factors are equally important, such as getting the proper vitamins, minerals, protein and fiber. We hear a lot about fats in the diet. Polyunsaturated oils lower your total blood cholesterol level, while monounsaturated oils (such as olive oil) lower LDL cholesterol levels and leave the beneficial HDL cholesterol intact. Saturated fats do nothing but clog up your arteries and add calories. Try these steps to reduce saturated fat in your diet: Eat less red meat. When you do eat red meat, trim the fat before cooking it and limit the portion size to no more than four or five ounces per day. (Stir-frying allows you to cook small amounts of meat with lots of fresh vegetables and very little fat.) Don’t eat organ meats. Organ meats (like liver, brain and kidney) have very high amounts of bad cholesterol and are also sources of concentrated toxins. Read labels. Avoid foods that contain large amounts of hydrogenated vegetable oils, such as cocoa butter, coconut and palm oils, beef fat or lard. Instead, use unsaturated fats such as olive or corn oil (if you use safflower oil, use it on salads but do not heat it as its helpful elements will break down). Eat low-fat cheeses. Use part-skim mozzarella and substitute skim milk for whole milk. Use skim milk in your coffee instead of cream or cream substitutes (many cream substitutes contain tropical oils which are very high in fat). Cook differently. Instead of sautéing vegetables in butter, spray your pan with a gluten-free nonstick spray; or precook onions, celery, green peppers and other vegetables by simmering them in a little water or broth, then drain. Cook with egg whites when possible instead of whole eggs. Now that you have cooking at home under control, what do you do when you eat out? Here are some tips: Choose entrees that are steamed, poached or broiled. Fish and chicken have far less calories, fat and cholesterol than beef. Eat half of your dinner; ask for a box to take home the rest for tomorrow’s meal. Restaurants today offer many low calorie selections. Even fast-food outlets offer salads and lean burgers (obviously, without the bun). Be wary of “Diet Platters”; they often contain tuna salad loaded with high-calorie mayonnaise, canned fruit in heavy sugared syrup and Iceberg lettuce, which have minimal nutrients. Finally, we have to confront the “E” word—Exercise! If you use the excuse that you can’t afford to join a health club, or you don’t have time to exercise (oh, that “E” word again!), then realize that you are only fooling yourself. You can walk and do floor exercises at home for free. You can walk up and down stairs at home or at a public building for free. Walking promotes a lifetime of good health, but don’t expect results overnight. In the beginning, forget stopwatches, heart rates, and technique. Just go for a walk at a comfortable pace for 30 minutes; or do two or three strolls for 10 minutes each (we all waste more time than that just dreaming up excuses why we shouldn’t exercise!). Once you are at ease with this, increase your pace, and/or the length of time of your walks. Finally, refine your method of walking. The correct posture, arm swing and stride add up to higher-intensity exercise and a lower risk of injury. Spinach Rice TomatoesFrom The Wheat-Free Gluten-Free Reduced Calorie Cookbook. This entrée or side dish is low fat, low cholesterol, vegetarian, vegan, corn-free, soy-free, gluten-free, yeast-free, egg-free, dairy-free, low sodium, low carbohydrates, and tastes great!Ingredients: 6 medium tomatoes 1 box (10 oz.) frozen chopped spinach, thawed 2 tablespoons olive oil ¼ cup rice 2 onions, chopped 1/8 teaspoon pepper ¼ cup carrots, shredded 1/8 teaspoon salt 1 tablespoon parsley, chopped 3 tablespoons tomato sauce 1 tablespoon dill ¾ cup water Directions: Cut a slice off the stem-end of each tomato; remove pulp (freeze the pulp from the tomatoes to use in soups or stews). Cut a small “X” on the bottom of each tomato; place in a baking pan. Pour ½-inch of water in the pan; cover and bake 15 minutes or until tomatoes are soft but still hold their shape. Remove tomatoes with a spatula; drain off water from pan. Spray pan with gluten-free nonstick spray, then return tomatoes to pan. Spray a skillet with gluten-free nonstick spray; add oil and sauté onions and carrots in oil slowly until golden brown, stirring frequently. Stir in remaining ingredients. Cover and simmer for 15 minutes or until moisture is absorbed. Remove from heat and cool 5 minutes. Fill tomato cavities with spinach mixture. Cover and bake for 15 minutes. Nutritional Breakdown: Calories: 71; Total fat: 4g; Saturated fat: 0.6g; Cholesterol: 0mg; Sodium: 108mg; Carbohydrates: 6g; Fiber: 1.7g; Sugar: 0.6g; Protein: 1.7 g
  14. Celiac.com 12/02/2011 - Some rumors have been circulating in the health foods community that gluten-free eating can encourage weight loss. Unfortunately, this theory is completely unfounded. Wendy Marcason, a registered dietician, published an article in the Journal of the American Dietetic Association in November that reviews some of the theories and controversy surrounding this issue. The article concludes that there is no scientific evidence to support a connection between eating gluten-free and losing weight. For those of us with celiac disease who start a gluten-free diet, weight gain is more often the case. The healing of the damaged intestines allows better absorption of food, and unless you rapidly change the amount of food you eat when you go gluten-free, most celiacs gain a substantial amount of weight after the switch. If you do not have celiac disease, however, eating gluten-free is unlikely to have any affect on weight independent from decreases in the overall calorie intake due to eating more carefully. The consequence of this conclusion by the American Dietetic Association may be that more non-celiacs recognize that gluten-free does not necessarily mean more healthy. Unfortunately, some of the increased availability of gluten-free food over the last decade is owed to these non-celiac gluten-free folks. If these non-celiacs stop eating gluten-free, the demand for gluten-free food will fall and te number of options may decrease. All of that said, the paper said that no evidence exists because there are no studies that look at weight loss on a gluten-free diet. While it's impossible to conclude that gluten-free diets cause weight loss, its also impossible to conclude that they don't cause weight-loss. Only a clinical study will be able to put the issue to rest. Reference: Marcason W. "Is There Evidence to Support the Claim that a Gluten-Free Diet Should Be Used for Weight Loss?" Journal of the American Dietetic Association. Nov 2011; 111(11): 1786. Weight Loss and the Gluten Free Diet by Ron Hoggan, Ed. D.First, I’d like to set Dr. O’Connell’s mind at rest. The claims for weight loss following adoption of a gluten-free diet aren’t merely rumors. They are credible claims based on peer reviewed and anecdotal reports, as well as published data from a qualified medical practitioner. For instance, Cheng and colleagues found that “54% of overweight and 47% of obese patients lost weight” (1). They investigated 81 subjects who were overweight and had celiac disease. Congruently, Venkatasubramani et al found that one half of their eight overweight pediatric patients also lost weight on a gluten free diet (2). These reports alone cast an ominous shadow over Dr. Marcason’s claims if Dr. O’Connell has represented them correctly. Marcason, we are told, asserts that no research has been done on this question. Yet there are three such reports in the peer reviewed literature (1, 2, 3). One reports a preponderance of weight gain among overweight and obese celiac patients after beginning a gluten free diet, while the other two groups report that about half of the overweight and obese celiac patients, children and adults, lose weight on a gluten free diet. Not only has this research been conducted and most of the findings not only contradict the claim that no such research has been done, but two of the three reports indicate that the gluten free diet helps with weight loss in some individuals. I think it is important to notice that the study showing that a large majority of overweight/obese celiacs was conducted where wheat starch is accepted as appropriate for celiac patients, while the two studies that showed weight loss were conducted in the USA. We still don’t know enough about the interaction between various constituents of gluten and people who lose weight on a gluten free diet. However, given the contradictions in findings, between research conducted in the USA and some parts of Europe, it is not unreasonable to suggest that these differences may result from wheat starch. Each of the three studies mentioned above have one large, consistent weakness. They are dealing with small numbers of patients. However, Dr. William Davis, a cardiologist has recently authored a book titled WHEAT BELLY, in which he reports that he has seen weight loss and other health improvements in more than 2,000 of his patients following adoption of a gluten free diet. And, of course, there are all the other anecdotal reports of similar benefits. Dr. O’Connell’s opposition to the use of a gluten free diet ignores the dynamics of appetite enhancement and satiation that are largely driven by hormones resulting from variations in nutrient density in various parts of the body. From insulin to glucagon to leptin to ghrelin, these and several other fat mobilizing hormones enhance and suppress our hunger based on the nutrients in our bloodstreams, gastrointestinal tract, and adipose tissues. Dr. O’Connell also ascribes Marcason’s views to the American Dietetic Association which is the body that publishes the journal in which Dr. Marcason’s opinion article appears. While it may be true that the American Dietetics Association takes this position, it would be unusual for a journal, and the association that operates that journal, to underwrite the claims of one of its authors so I am skeptical that it has done so. I am especially skeptical of endorsement by the association, if Marcason has, indeed, stated that no studies have been conducted to investigate changes in body mass resulting from the gluten free diet among people who are overweight or obese at diagnosis. Clearly, this is an inaccurate claim whether it emanates from O’Connell or Marcason or even the American Dietetics Association. I am also left wondering if there are any studies that show that “gluten-free does not necessarily mean more healthy” [sic]. I haven’t seen any and I would be very surprised if any exist. Dr. O’Connell didn’t cite any such studies, yet she asserts that a gluten free diet is not a healthy choice for those who do not have celiac disease. This is especially troubling in view of the growing recognition of non-celiac gluten sensitivity as a legitimate disease entity (5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10). I frequently write opinion articles so I would not want to inhibit such writing. Nonetheless, I believe that taking a rigid stance on either side of this issue is premature. Clearly we all have a lot to learn about weight loss and the gluten-free diet. The scanty evidence that is currently available is entirely too limited to say, with confidence, that the gluten-free diet is an effective weight loss tool, even for overweight patients with celiac disease. It appears to work for some, but other, unseen factors may be at work here. Sources: Cheng J, Brar PS, Lee AR, Green PH. Body mass index in celiac disease: beneficial effect of a gluten-free diet. J Clin Gastroenterol. 2010 Apr;44(4):267-71. Venkatasubramani N, Telega G, Werlin SL. Obesity in pediatric celiac disease. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2010 Sep;51(3):295-7. Dickey W, Kearney N. Overweight in celiac disease: prevalence, clinical characteristics, and effect of a gluten-free diet. Am J Gastroenterol. 2006 Oct;101(10):2356-9. Davis W. Wheat Belly.Rodale, NY, NY 2011. Bizzaro N, Tozzoli R, Villalta D, Fabris M, Tonutti E. Cutting-Edge Issues in Celiac Disease and in Gluten Intolerance. Clin Rev Allergy Immunol. 2010 Dec 23. Ford RP. The gluten syndrome: a neurological disease. Med Hypotheses. 2009 Sep;73(3):438-40. Epub 2009 Apr 29. Sbarbati A, Valletta E, Bertini M, Cipolli M, Morroni M, Pinelli L, Tatò L. Gluten sensitivity and 'normal' histology: is the intestinal mucosa really normal? Dig Liver Dis. 2003 Nov;35(11):768-73. PubMed PMID: 14674666. Di Cagno R, De Angelis M, De Pasquale I, Ndagijimana M, Vernocchi P, Ricciuti P, Gagliardi F, Laghi L, Crecchio C, Guerzoni ME, Gobbetti M, Francavilla R. Duodenal and faecal microbiota of celiac children: molecular, phenotype and metabolome characterization. BMC Microbiol. 2011 Oct 4;11:219. Biesiekierski JR, Newnham ED, Irving PM, Barrett JS, Haines M, Doecke JD, Shepherd SJ, Muir JG, Gibson PR. Gluten causes gastrointestinal symptoms in subjects without celiac disease: a double-blind randomized placebo-controlled trial. Am J Gastroenterol. 2011 Mar;106(3):508-14 Bizzaro N, Tozzoli R, Villalta D, Fabris M, Tonutti E. Cutting-Edge Issues in Celiac Disease and in Gluten Intolerance. Clin Rev Allergy Immunol. 2010 Dec 23. Amy O'Connell, MD, PhD's Reply to Dr. Ron Hoggan:This is Dr. O'Connell replying. My piece was merely a summary of an article in the Journal of the ADA. The short summary I wrote was not intended to be an end-all conclusive statement about the matter. That said, the Cheng article that is cited by Ron Hoggard. M.Ed. was not designed to look at the outcome of weight loss in overweight celiacs and is underpowered to make the conclusions that he cites. Another quote from the same article said, "Overall, 54% [of patients who started a gluten-free diet] gained weight and 38% lost weight." The same problem with a lack of statistical power exists for the Venkatasubramani paper. Four obese patients lost weight on a gluten-free diet but 2 gained weight and 1 was lost to follow up. I'd like to apologize if my brief summary seemed too closed-ended, but I will stand by my article conclusion, "While it's impossible to conclude that gluten-free diets cause weight loss, its also impossible to conclude that they don't cause weight-loss. Only a clinical study will be able to put the issue to rest."
  15. Celiac.com 10/11/2010 - People who follow a gluten-free diet solely for the purposes of losing weight may be setting themselves up for failure. For people with celiac disease and gluten intolerance, following a gluten-free diet is both necessary and beneficial from a medical standpoint. People with celiac disease or gluten sensitivity must not eat the gluten proteins found in wheat, rye, and barley. For people with celiac disease, eating even minute traces of gluten can trigger an autoimmune reaction damages the lining the small intestine. An estimated three million Americans have celiac disease—and the vast majority remain undiagnosed because the symptoms can vary or mimic other diseases. Symptoms commonly include bloating, gas, diarrhea and constipation, as well as early osteoporosis. People with celiac disease also suffer high rates of skin rashes, chronic fatigue, bone and joint pain, neurological problems, liver problems, diabetes, infertility in both men and women and cancers, including lymphoma. Rates of celiac disease are up 400% in the last 50 years, and, according to the Archives of Internal Medicine Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, celiac disease diagnoses have increased 20-fold since 1989. Some doctors think gluten sensitivity could affect up to 10% of the population. Until now, doctors diagnosed gluten sensitivity mainly by ruling out celiac disease in people who show symptoms. But researchers are looking more and more at antibodies to gliadin, a gluten component, as a possible biomarker. About 7% of people have these anti-gliadin antibodies (AGA); interestingly, so do 18% of people with autism, and 20% of people with schizophrenia, according to studies by Dr. Alessio Fassano. These numbers, coupled major advances in diagnosis, greater awareness among doctors and better information sharing among those affected, have made for rapid expansion of the gluten-free food markets, and great buzz on the part of manufacturers, advertisers, retailers, and consumers. That's made for an explosion of new gluten-free products on the food market in the last few years. All of this buzz may tempt many to wonder what it's all about, and if eliminating gluten can provide benefits, such as losing weight. For some, gluten-free foods have become a new health craze, with promises of a slimmer, fitter, healthier body for those who go gluten-free. Sounds great, right? Just stop eating wheat and gluten and get slim and healthy and live happily-ever-after. Not so fast. A gluten-free diet is simply not for everyone. For some, depending on what kind of gluten-free foods they eat, going gluten-free may have the opposite effect. A gluten-free diet will not automatically help people lose weight or avoid carbohydrates. "Many packaged gluten-free products are even higher in carbs, sugar, fat and calories than their regular counterparts, and they tend to be lower in fiber, vitamins and iron," says Shelley Case, a registered dietician on the medical advisory board of the Celiac Disease Foundation. Gluten-free does not automatically mean nutritious, she notes. Gluten is not only a key ingredient in baked goods. It's also used as a thickening agent in ketchup and ice cream. But, just like their regular, gluten-containing counterparts, gluten-free products like cake, brownie and cookie mixes are often high in fat and calories. For example, a serving of regular pasta provides 41 grams of carbohydrates, compared to 46 grams for a similar gluten-free pasta. So, most experts agree that a gluten-free diet is both necessary and beneficial for those with celiac disease and gluten-intolerance. In such cases, avoiding gluten with usually help people to stabilize and reverse either weight gain, or loss, depending on the case. Otherwise, there's no scientific evidence to suggest that adopting a gluten-free diet is a good way to lose weight. These and other valuable insights into gluten-free diet can be found in Emily Beckman's full-length article for The Wall Street Journal.
  16. AU- Fallstrom SP; Kristiansson B; Ryd W JN- Acta Pathol Microbiol Scand [A]; 89 (6) p431-8 PY- Nov 1981 AB- Eighty-one children aged 4-18 months with unsatisfactory weight gain were investigated for organic diseases; the investigation included small-intestinal biopsy. Sixteen had total villous atrophy, in most cases due to gluten intolerance. Transient disease, e.g. cows milk protein intolerance, was probable in 7 children with subtotal atrophy. In 18 children the only abnormal finding was an increased number of inflammatory cells in the mucosa, a finding which was probably of no clinical significance. Planimetric measurement showed good agreement between the mucosal surface/volume ratio and an ordinary histological grouping of the mucosa. A significant correlation was found between the rate of weight gain during the period preceding investigation and mucosal surface/volume ratio.
  17. For 100 units of whole grain wheat, about 70 units of white flour results from the milling process. The rest is separately sold as wheat bran or wheat germ. Those 70 units of flour are about 10%- 15% protein, thus about 7 to 10 units of protein for 100 units of whole wheat. The protein is about 80% gluten, thus about 6 to 8 units of gluten for 100 units of whole wheat. Since one typically sees wheat flour as an ingredient, applying the 70% factor implies 8 to 12 units of gluten per 100 units of wheat flour.
×
×
  • Create New...