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Found 19 results

  1. Dr. Rodney Ford M.D.

    Gluten-related Disorders: Not Black and White

    Celiac.com 04/20/2016 - I am likely to be accused of gluten heresy. That is because I propose that celiac disease and gluten sensitivity usually coexist. By this I mean that they are not mutually exclusive entities. In other words, most people who have celiac disease are also gluten-sensitive. Many people who are gluten-sensitive are likely to develop celiac disease with continued gluten exposure (depending on their genetic markers). My observations show that the distinction between celiac disease and gluten-sensitivity (the gluten syndrome) is blurred. The purpose of published algorithms and decision trees are designed to separate out celiac disease from other gluten-illnesses. I suggest that this thinking is flawed. For example, most flow charts go something like this: (See Flow Chart 1 at left). People are selected for celiac-blood-tests for a number of reasons. If your blood tests are positive (and usually if you carry a DQ2/8 gene), then you get an endoscopy to confirm/deny the diagnosis. This allows you to be categorized either Yes-celiac disease or Not-celiac disease. There is no overlap. This is an "us-and-them" scenario. However, isolating YES-celiac disease from every other gluten problem does not take into account that people who have gluten-gut-damage may well have other manifestations of gluten-related disorders. Such simplistic algorithms (decision trees) strike problems at every decision point. Such as: Who should be tested? Who should be re-tested? When should these tests be done? At what age? On how much gluten? What tests should be done? What are the cut-off levels? How important is carrying the DQ2/8 genes? What about sero-negative celiac disease? How accurate are endoscopic biopsies? Who interprets the Marsh scale? How long should a gluten challenge be? Such simplistic algorithms (decision trees) also do not give satisfactory answers to the following questions: Why do 10% of people with celiac disease have little or no symptoms, despite having severe small bowel damage (villous atrophy)? This group is called "asymptomatic" celiac disease. Villous atrophy alone cannot account for the majority of gluten-related symptoms. Why do half of the people with celiac disease have autonomic nervous system dysfunction? This is the disturbance of the automatic nerve activity of your internal organs. This cannot be directly attributed to villous atrophy. Why do most people with celiac disease have some brain/mental upset, including the pervasive brain-fog? Many people have neurological disease from gluten but do not have established celiac disease. How can so many "extra-intestinal manifestations" of celiac disease be attributed to intestinal gut damage alone? I am sure that you will have witnessed strong feelings from the defenders of 'celiac-disease-is-a-stand-alone illness'. For instance, read these two opposing comments from Facebook: A. "I find it hard to believe that gluten intolerant people (or gluten avoiders) are as strict as us who have celiac disease." B. "I am gluten intolerant (suspected Celiac but I refuse to eat gluten in order to be tested properly) … I am incredibly strict on what I eat." The world of gluten is not black and white! But there remains a tension between those who have "biopsy-proven" celiac disease, and those people who are "gluten-intolerant". However, there is a cross-over between gluten-sensitivity/intolerance and celiac disease. There is no sharp dividing line – there is lots of grey! I would like to see the support groups of both celiac disease and gluten sensitivity work together with a focus on their common ground. This is already happening in some countries. Both groups promote an accurate diagnosis and a strict gluten-free diet. But I call into question the accuracy of current diagnostic methodology. Another comment from Facebook is a good example of these blurred lines: "I had an endoscopy and I have some small intestine damage: increased intraepithelial lymphocytes, shortened villi and duodenitis. The gastroenterologist said I had gluten-sensitivity but because I was not celiac (wasn't Marsh stage 3a), he said that I didn't need to be quite as careful with gluten. But I know I am super sensitive - even a small piece of chocolate with gluten in it makes me sick for a few weeks. I suspect that I either didn't have enough gluten before the endoscopy, or I am in the early stages of developing it." This is what I conclude: Both groups (people with celiac disease, and people with gluten sensitivity/intolerance) come under the umbrella category of gluten-related disorders. The term non-celiac gluten-sensitivity (NCGS) excludes those with evidence of intestinal damage from gluten. But with time and continued gluten ingestion, some of these people will develop celiac disease. NCGS is part of the gluten-related disorders spectrum (see my book: www.glutenrelateddisorder.com). Both groups have an identical list of possible symptoms. They are both equally harmed by gluten. They are indistinguishable from each other without blood tests and/or endoscopy. For both groups, my recommendation is to be zero gluten. Avoidance of cross-contamination is crucial for everyone. Both groups can be exquisitely sensitive to gluten. Some celiacs experience no symptoms from gluten, making it more of a challenge for them to remain gluten-zero. Some gluten-sensitive people do not yet have overt symptoms but are developing an inflammatory state. Many people who are gluten-sensitive produce antibodies to gluten, AGA (anti-gliadin-antibodies). There is a large literature on this. AGA-positive people are more likely to develop gluten-illnesses. AGA tests are recommended in the Fasano paper the "spectrum of gluten related disorders", for the celiac and gluten sensitivity work-up (particularly for neurological disorders). I use them on a day-to-day basis in my Clinic, and so do many other practitioners. More wheat/gluten harmful proteins have yet to be identified. Early in the development of celiac disease, the person can have significant symptoms, and they may have elevated AGA antibodies, but they may have no evidence yet of intestinal damage. At this stage these two conditions are indistinguishable. How early can you diagnose celiac disease? Do you have to wait until there is substantial intestinal damage so that you can make the classic diagnosis with villous atrophy? Or do you keep on eating gluten until the damage has occurred? Or do you go strictly gluten zero and not know if you are gluten sensitive or have early celiac disease? The HLA gene (DQ2/DQ8) cannot be used as a casting vote. It is my recommendation to abandon gluten as early as possible and not wait until you have substantial intestinal damage, which may never heal. Not only is the gluten intolerant community (this includes celiac disease) confused about gluten-illness. Also, the medical fraternity is confused. The science and clinical issues are rapidly developing whilst most medical practitioners are still looking for the classic celiac with weight loss, malabsorption, and a bloated tummy (and are using an out-of-date simplistic algorithm). Many people request celiac tests of their GPs but are denied the test. The community is much more aware of gluten related disorder than medical practitioners. Yes, there are a lot of issues to think about. These gluten-illnesses are complicated to diagnose. My prediction is that increasing numbers of people will adopt a gluten zero diet. However, almost certainly it is much more than the substance gluten that is making us sick. It will take a long time to unravel all of these strings. Most people are after an easy answer, or a drug, or a vaccine. But I'm sure that it is going to become even more complicated as we learn more. These complexities do not show up in a simplistic algorithm. The way for an individual to solve this is to adopt a gluten-zero diet, lifelong.
  2. Scott Adams

    White Bread (Gluten-Free)

    This recipe has been modified from Bette Hagemans Butter Basted White Bread (More From the Gluten-Free Gourmet, page 38). Here it is: Combine 2 cups white rice flour, ½ cup potato starch flour, ½ cup tapioca flour, 2 ½ teaspoon xanthan gum, 2/3 cup dairy milk powder, 1 ½ teaspoon salt, 2 tablespoons plus 1 teaspoon sugar and 2 ¼ teaspoon saf-instant yeast granules thoroughly. In a separate bowl, combine 4 tablespoons melted butter, 1 cup warm water, 1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar. Slowly add to dry mixture, then add 3 room temperature eggs, one at a time (the mix should feel a little warm). Beat on high for 2 minutes. Cover with plastic wrap and a towel, and rise until doubled (time varies). After the first rise, beat the dough again for 3 minutes on high. Fill a large loaf pan 2/3 full (can use extra dough in muffin tins) Let rise until slightly over top of pan; bake at 350 for 30-45 minutes, covering with alum foil after the first 10 minutes. Delicious, and freezes pretty well. This recipe comes to us from Marne L. Platt in New Jersey.
  3. If you're looking for an easy, savory meal that's sure to satisfy, then give this dish a try. It's a hearty treat that's just perfect for fall. Ingredients: 1 pound pound Polska kielbasa 2½ cups cannellini, or navy beans, rinsed and drained 2 cups chicken broth 3 cloves of garlic 2 teaspoons dried oregano ½ teaspoon onion powder 1 tablespoon olive oil 2 medium tomatoes, diced 5 cups baby spinach leaves 1 small head of cauliflower, cut into smaller chunks Freshly ground black pepper, as desired Directions: Cook the sausage in a cast iron skillet or non-stick pan on medium high. Sear the sausage well, then slice as desired. Put the beans in a medium bowl, add the cooked sausage, pan drippings, and put aside. Leave the oil from the sausages in the pan, and add the cauliflower. Place in an oven at 400F, and roast until tender, about 20 minutes. While the cauliflower roasts, put the chicken broth and garlic in a large pot. Bring to a simmer over medium-high heat. Add the oil, oregano, onion powder, sausage and beans from the skillet. Stir well and the tomatoes. Heat until beans are tender. Add spinach and cook just until the leaves are wilted. Stir well and serve. You can add the cauliflower to the pot as you wish, or serve in on the side. Also, you can bake the sausages if you like, just reserve the pan drippings and do everything else as per the recipe.
  4. Celiac.com 10/03/2017 - As people eat less processed foods, and more people adopt a gluten-free diet, manufacturers are selling less and less refined wheat flour, less bread, rolls, and cereals. Consumption of wheat is plummeting, and that has the people who grow wheat wondering what to do. Well, one thing wheat growers can do is hire researchers to study the problem in such a way that the logical conclusion is that foods made from refined grains, such as breads, rolls, and cereals, aren’t really that bad after all. And that seems to be what happened with a recent study funded by the Grain Foods Foundation, an industry group. Unsurprisingly, perhaps, the study, published last month in the journal Nutrients, calls things like breads, rolls, tortillas, and ready-to-eat cereals "meaningful contributors" of nutrients like thiamin, folate, iron, zinc, and niacin. The study notes that such foods are also low in added sugars and fats, which is not the case with many grain foods like baked goods. Rather than being independent, both authors of the study work for PR companies that help other companies, including major food and beverage companies, communicate the benefits of their products. While it’s true that many refined grain foods provide these nutrients, there are many other sources. For example, foods like white beans, lentils, spinach, dark chocolate, and tofu provide iron, while oysters, beef, baked beans, yogurt, and chickpeas provide zinc. Is bread bad for people? Mostly not. People with celiac disease need to eat gluten-free, and should probably make an extra effort to eat foods that are nutrient dense. For most folks bread is fine, but as with many foods, not all breads are equal. Look for whole-grain breads that are nutrient dense. Watch out for the added sugar, salt, and fat that come with many processed foods. And don’t be swayed by industry-funded studies that tell you to eat more of the product they are peddling. Read more at: Healthline.com
  5. Celiac.com 12/25/2015 - Cornish hens make a great alternative to turkey, especially for a small group, or a couple. This version uses Cornish hens and white wine to deliver a tasty variation on the great French classic Coq au Vin. It will make a great anchor for any holiday dinner. Ingredients: 2 Cornish hens, 1 to 1½ pounds each, rinsed and patted dry 2 slices thick-cut bacon ¼ cup gluten-free flour or potato starch 1 cup dry white wine ½ cup water 2 garlic cloves Kosher salt and freshly cracked black pepper Directions: Heat a large stock pot over medium heat and add the bacon. Cook until browned and crisp and the fat is rendered. Remove the bacon to a paper-towel. Season birds heavily with salt and pepper, then dredge in the seasoned flour until coated. Heat the pan with the bacon fat over medium heat. Add the hens and brown on all sides. Carefully add the wine, letting it bubble and release the browned bits on the bottom of the pan. No white wine? Use red wine. Stir in the water and garlic cloves and bring to a boil, then reduce the heat to a gentle simmer. Cover and braise until hens are cooked through, about 20 minutes. Transfer the hens to a platter and cover with aluminum foil to keep warm. Continue simmering the liquid, uncovered, until thickened, about 10 minutes. Season gravy with salt and pepper, to taste. Nestle the hens in the gravy and simmer until heated through. Arrange the hens on a serving platter. Crumble bacon over hens, and serve with gravy, surrounded by your favorite sides.
  6. Just when I thought that nothing in the gluten-free realm of products could surprise me anymore, I was lucky enough to get in the mail a frozen Inspired by Happiness Gluten-Free Dreamin’ of Chocolate Black & White Chocolate Layer Cake, which led to one of the most wonderful gluten-free experiences that I've had in a long time! From the moment I laid eyes on this cake I was impressed. So much so that I decided to serve it for dessert at a friend's dinner party—even though I had never before tasted it. In the gluten-free world this can be a risky proposition—especially when most of the guests attending were not on a gluten-free diet. When dessert was finally served my friend was surprised to see a piece in front of me, because he assumed that it wasn't gluten-free (again, it just looked too good!). After he found out that it was gluten-free he seemed let down...but after one bite it was clear that this cake was beyond good—it was simply astonishing! As you can tell by the picture, this is a very rich chocolate cake. There are generous amounts of white and dark chocolate throughout, and the cake is incredibly moist and held together perfectly. It also wasn't too sweet tasting, which made the white and dark chocolate flavors really stand out. After this experience it is clear to me that Inspired by Happiness cakes are perfect for any special occasion, including dinner parties, birthdays and weddings. For more info visit: Inspired-By-Happiness.com
  7. This recipes comes to us from Kathy Scholz. In a small bowl combine: ½ cup warm water 2 teaspoons sugar 4 teaspoons dry yeast granules Set aside and let stand for 15 minutes 2 cups white rice flour 2 cups tapioca flour ¼ cup sugar 4 teaspoons xanthan gum 2/3 cup dry milk 1 ½ teaspoons salt Combine the above six ingredients in a large bowl (use largest mixing bowl). 1 ½ cups water 4 tablespoons melted butter or oil 1 teaspoon gluten-free vinegar 3 eggs Mix above dry ingredients in a large bowl, and the four liquid ingredients in a small bowl, then add the butter mixture and yeast mixture to the dry ingredients. Beat on high for 2 minutes. Use two small greased bread pans, as one large one seems to cause the bread to rise too high and become like a mushroom. Allow to rise in pan, then bake at 350 degrees 20 - 25 minutes. Adjust time depending on size of loaves. Can also be made as sandwich rolls, as indicated below: use small individual pie tins (about 4 across, purchase in paper goods supply store, round out the bottom crease with your thumb and finger, or press the tin down on the bottom of a jar the appropriate size to round out the crease, these may be reused time and time again) spray the tins with cooking oil, divide dough to make about 12 sandwich rolls, place pie tins on two cookie sheets, allow to rise, if desired brush with a mixture of egg and water, sprinkle sesame seed or poppy seeds over top, before baking. Bake until nicely browned in 15 -20 minutes.
  8. This recipe comes to us from Rick Barrera. From several recipes, I have put together my own recipe for Gluten-free white bread. It is a white rice, tapioca, corn and yeast bread that is very spongy and a wonderful breakfast and lunch bread. Would love to hear from others who have experimented with different bread recipes and bread machines. Hope you enjoy it and write back. Dry Ingredients (Mix in a bowl): 2 cups white rice flour 1 cup tapioca flour ½ cup corn starch 2/3 cup powdered dry milk ½ cup Sugar 1 tablespoons xanthan gum 2 packets dry yeast 1 ½ teaspoons salt Liquid (Mix Separately in another bowl): 4 eggs beaten lightly 1 ½ cups warm Water ¼ cup Corn Oil 1 Teaspoon Cider Vinegar Add Liquid to mixed dry ingredients. Mix well for 60 seconds. Let Rise for 1 ½ hours in warm humid area. Then bake 50 min. in nonstick bread tin at 350 degrees. Remove from oven when very light brown. Note: Removing light will keep bread spongy and less crumbly. Let cool for 10 min. then remove from tin and cool for 30 min longer. Ready to eat.
  9. Ever since my husband diagnose with celiac disease, he was a littlebit depressed because he could not just simple go and grab something toeat. At the beginning, he tried to keep an open mind and went to storesthat sell gluten-free products. Most of the time, he was disappointedwith the taste of the products. One day, he came home from work andtold me how his co-workers teased him with a yummy looking chocolatechips cookie and he felt extremely depressed because he could not eatthem and he absolutely LOVES to snack. I found his co-workers' actionvery childish and decided that I would create a recipe the my husbandwould love and he could has plenty of supply at work so when the samesituation ever happen again, he would be prepared. Myhusband's favorite cookie is white chocolate chip with macadamias nut;hence, I decided to try making a gluten free version of the cookie forhim. After a few try with different flour mix and ingredients. I got arecipe that not only my husband enjoys but also his co-workers aftertrying them.This is my modified version of gluten-free cookie recipe.The cookies from this recipe has a nice soft texture. This recipe will makes about 2 - 21/2 dozen cookies. Preparation Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 12-15 minutes INGREDIENTS: 2 1/4 cup of Silka Flour Mix (2/3 cup of Brown Rice Flour, 1/2 cupeach of white rice flour, tapioca flour, 1/3 cup of corn starch, 1/4cup of potato starch) 1 stick of unsalted butter (melted) or 1/2 cup of oil 2/3 cup of light brown sugar 2/3 cup of sugar 2 eggs 1 teaspoon of gluten-free vanilla extract 1/4 teaspoon of salt 1 teaspoon of gluten-free baking powder 1 teaspoon of gluten-free baking soda 1 1/2 of teaspoon of xanthan gum 1 cup of white chocolate chip 1 tbsp of milk (optional) 1/2 cup of macadamias nut (optional) DIRECTIONS: Preheat oven to 375 degree and line 2 baking sheet with parchment pager or use nonstick spray to grease the baking sheet. Mix melted butter, brown sugar and sugar until incorporated, add eggs and vanilla extract until blended In a medium bowl, whisk Silka Flour Mix, baking powder, baking soda, xanthan gum and salt Stir the dry ingredients to the butter mix until incorporated. Stir in white chocolate chip and Macadamias nut (optional) into the cookie dough If the dough appears to be a little dry, add in milk but it's entirely optional Use a tablespoon to scoop the cookie dough onto prepared cooking sheet, space them about 2 inches apart Bake for 12-15 minutes or until cookies turn golden cool cookies for 5 minutes before transferring them into a wire rack
  10. If you're having a craving for something fried, delicious, original and gluten-free to liven up your dinner, then consider these bacon and white bean croquettes. They're easy to make, easy to cook, and they add a savory twist to an otherwise mundane meal. I like to make them with Rice Chex, but you can also use your favorite gluten-free breadcrumbs. Top them with a dash of parmesan or Romano cheese, and serve with meat dish like pork or lamb chops, and a salad, for a delicious meal. Ingredients: 2 cups cooked or canned white beans, drained (set aside a few tablespoons of liquid from drained beans) ½ cup onion, chopped fine ⅓ cup crushed Rice Chex, or fresh gluten-free breadcrumbs ¼ cup dried or fresh parsley, minced ½ teaspoon of black pepper 1 egg, lightly beaten 2 strips of crisp bacon, chopped fine 1 to 1½ tablespoon of hot sauce (optional) 1 cup peanut oil (use other oil as needed) parmesan or Romano cheese, grated (as desired) salt to taste Directions: Heat oven to 200°F. Mash the beans, but leave them lumpy. Add bean water as necessary to even out the paste. Combine beans, bacon, onion, egg, parsley, salt, and pepper. Mix well. Add crumbs (I like Rice Chex best, but it's important to crush them well) or cornmeal little by little until you can shape the mixture by hand. Shape the mixture into patties, and cook in lightly oiled pan, 3-5 minutes each side or until golden brown on each side. Warm patties at 200°F until they are all cooked. Top with grated parmesan or Romano cheese and serve.
  11. This recipe comes to us from Phyllis Chinn. 1 - 2 large onions, chopped 1 tablespoon oil 2 cloves minced garlic 1 4-oz can chopped green chilis (Old El Paso brabd is gluten-free) 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon pepper ½ teaspoon ground cumin ¼ teaspoon cayenne ¼ teaspoon ground cloves 2 cans gluten-free chicken broth 3 - 4 cans great northern beans (Green Giant is a good brand) Simmer 4 chicken breasts in water and seasonings until tender. or simmer in homemade chicken broth. Cool and cut or shred into large pieces. Sauté onions in oil until translucent. Add the seasonings. chilis, chicken broth and beans and simmer for approximately 1 hour, on low heat, stirring frequently. If too thick, thin with chicken broth or water. Add chicken and simmer about 20 minutes more. Serve topped with shredded Monterey jack cheese. Freezes well.
  12. Celiac.com 10/08/2012 - Since 2004 when Congress passed the Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act, sufferers of celiac disease have awaited some sort of finalized action from the FDA to set a rule for gluten-free labeling. The FDA proposed a gluten-free food labeling rule in 2007 and since then, there have been multiple open comment periods for it, but as of yet, there has been no finalized action to control gluten-free labeling in food products. In an effort to expedite this process, “Jennifer I” of Sebastopol, CA started a petition on the White House's official website. Part of the concern driving this petition stems from the fact that for many, the gluten-free diet is one of necessity, not of choice. 'Gluten-free' has become something of a new marketing buzzword, as the diet's popularity has grown dramatically in recent years. This makes labeling more important than ever: companies seeking to cash in on a growing market may be tempted to cut corners and label products as gluten-free, when in fact they are not. Supposedly, the FDA will be finalizing their rule sometime this year. Whether or not they stick to that time frame, this petition is a quick and easy way of putting more pressure on the federal government to finalize a gluten-free labeling rule. Source: https://petitions.whitehouse.gov/petition/finalize-standards-gluten-free-labeling/SsmdZh3C?utm_source=wh.gov&utm_medium=shorturl&utm_campaign=shorturl
  13. This recipe comes to us from Lynn Facey. 2 cups gluten-free flour (Bette Hagmans) 2 teaspoons xanthan gum 1 ½ cups sugar 1 teaspoon salt 3 ½ teaspoon baking powder ½ cup shortening 1 cup milk 1 teaspoon vanilla 3 eggs Heat oven to 350. Grease and flour baking pan, 13 X 9 X 2 or 2 round layer pans or for cupcakes (muffin tins) - use paper liners. Measure all ingredients into a large bowl. Blend 1/2 minute on low speed, scraping bowl constantly. Beat 3 minutes on high speed, scraping bowl occasionally. Pour into pans. Bake 40-45 minutes for oblong, 30-35 for round, and 15-20 for cupcakes or until wooden pick inserted in center comes out clean. Cool.
  14. In France, shops that serve mussels in broth with pommes frittes, or french fries, are ubiquitous. Mussels are delicious, nutritious and quick and easy to make. They go great with fried potatoes and a good gluten-free beer. I cut corners even further by dashing out for my favorite french fries while the mussels finish simmering. Ingredients: 1 tablespoon olive oil 3 pounds of fresh, high quality mussels 1 cup of dry white wine 1 cup of chicken stock 2 tablespoons minced parsley 1 cup sliced shallots 2 cloves of garlic 2 tablespoons butter Dash of fresh cream Lemon wedges Directions: Wash the mussels thoroughly, discarding any broken shell or dead mussels. Preheat a large pot to medium heat and add the olive oil and butter. Once the butter has melted, add the sliced shallots, a little salt, and pepper then saute for 5 minutes. Add the garlic and cook for another minute. Add wine, chicken stock and mussels, then cover the pot. Steam the mussels for about 10 minutes or until all the mussels open. Discard any mussels that do not open. Stir in cream and parsley. Season to taste and serve with lemon wedges and french fries or fried potatoes.
  15. Sure, lots of the meals I make are variations on meals that traditionally contain gluten. However, I also make many that just happen to be gluten-free. Here's one of my favorites. Grilled pork chops are an old stand-by. Cheap, easy to prepare, and delicious. I serve this version with steamed fresh broccoli and carrots, along with mashed white sweet potatoes. The result is a quick, delicious summertime meal that is easy on the budget and leaves plenty of calories for wine or a nice dessert. Ingredients: 3-4 Pork chops 12-16 broccoli or broccoli spears (3-4 per chop) 3-4 white sweet potatoes (cubed) ¼ cup butter Splash of milk Splash of Balsamic vinegar Directions: Place pork chops on a hot grill (475-500 degrees) After 1 minute or so, rotate chop 90-degrees. Making sure chop is well-seared, after 1 more minute or so, flip chop. Repeat the process, rotating the chop 90-degrees again after about 1 minute. For thicker shops, use longer sear times. When chop is done, remove to a plate and let rest five minutes. White Sweet Potatoes and Carrots: Just before the putting the chops on the grill, place sweet potatoes and carrots on separate sides of a large steamer pot with hot water. While chops cook, steam sweet potatoes until soft enough to easily slide a fork though. Remove carrots when tender, but firm. Place carrots in a dish with a bit of butter, and cover. Place in a large bowl. Do not rinse. Broccoli: While chops are resting, and before mashing sweet potatoes, place broccoli into steamer and cover. Mash sweet potatoes. Add butter and/or a splash of milk. Salt and pepper to taste. Place sweet potatoes on plates next to chops. Remove broccoli when tender to fork. Place on plates with chops. Splash broccoli with aged balsamic vinegar. Serves: 3-4 persons Note: By 'white sweet potato," I do NOT mean the red-fleshed, orange-skinned tuber that Americans call a "Yam." I mean the white-fleshed, paler-skinned version that often appears alongside the at the market, both of which, according to botanists are actually sweet potatoes, not yams. Sweet potatoes are low-glycemic, which makes them ideal for diabetics. They also taste really good mashed with butter, salt and pepper. And, yes, if you're feeling particularly potato-ish, you can use good old regular potatoes instead.
  16. Jules Shepard

    Wonderful White Bread (Gluten-Free)

    This recipe may be prepared using a mixer and oven or in a bread machine. This loaf is light and airy, yet substantial enough to use as sandwich bread (however, if you want a denser loaf, simply add 1/4 cup dry milk powder to the dry ingredients). The recipe boasts the addition of flax seed meal and flax seeds which contribute a large amount of dietary fiber and other beneficial nutritional properties like high omega 3. The simple addition of two tablespoons of flax seed meal to this bread also adds four grams of dietary fiber and three grams of protein. As an alternative, you can simply use 2 eggs in place of the flax seed and water mixture, and you will add the dry yeast to the dough at the final mixing step. When using a bread machine, always be sure to add all liquid ingredients to the pan first, followed by the dry ingredients. I recommend sifting all dry ingredients (except yeast) together in a bowl first, then pouring it into the bread machine pan. If the dough seems too thick, gradually add more yogurt, one quarter cup at a time, until the dough is still thick, but able to be smoothed with a spatula. Be sure to check the bread with a spatula throughout the mixing process to ensure that all the dry ingredients have been incorporated. Smooth the top with a rubber spatula and when done mixing, sprinkle any desired toppings on top of the loaf. Select either the gluten-free bread setting on your machine, or the quickest bake setting like a light crust 1 ½ pound loaf. Remove the pan from the machine when finished baking (internal temperature should be between 205-210F). When making with a mixer and oven, follow the specific directions outlined below. Ingredients: 2 Tablespoons ground flax seeds or flax seed meal ½ cup very hot water 1 tsp. granulated cane sugar 1 Tablespoon rapid rise or bread machine yeast ¼ cup Earth Balance Shortening, cut into small pieces (or canola oil, if using a bread machine) 3 ¼ cups Jules Gluten FreeTM All Purpose Flour * ½ teaspoon baking soda 2 teaspoons gluten-free baking powder Pinch of salt 2 Tablespoons honey 1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar 1 ½ cup vanilla yogurt (dairy or soy) 1 Tablespoon flax seeds Toppings of choice (coarse sea salt, sesame seeds, flax seeds, etc.) (* I cannot predict how this recipe will work with any other flour mixture but my own. The mix recipe may be found in media links on my website and in my book, Nearly Normal Cooking for Gluten-Free Eating, or pre-mixed from my website.)Directions: In a small bowl, add the hot water and flax seed meal and stir. Let sit for 5 minutes. Add the yeast and one teaspoon of sugar to this mixture and stir. Set aside for 5 more minutes for it to begin to bubble and grow; if the mixture does not bubble or grow, throw it out and re-mix with fresh yeast. Sift remaining dry ingredients together in a large bowl. Cut in the pieces of shortening using a pastry cutter or the dough paddle on your mixer. Add the remaining liquid ingredients next, mixing well. Finally, mix in the yeast/flax seed meal mixture and stir well using the dough paddle. If the dough seems too thick to form a loaf, gradually mix in more yogurt, one quarter cup at a time, until the dough is still thick, but able to be smoothed with a spatula. Scoop the dough into a greased bread pan (use a dark metal pan if you like a darker crust on your bread; lighter, shiny metal or glass if you like a light crust). Smooth the top, sprinkle with any toppings, then cover with a sheet of wax paper sprayed with cooking oil. Sit the covered dough for 30 minutes in a warm place like an oven warming drawer or even in your oven with the light on. Remove the raised dough to a preheated convection oven set to 275 F or a preheated static oven set to 300 F. Cook for approximately 60 minutes, or until the crust is browning nicely and a cake tester or skewer inserted into the center of the loaf comes out clean (internal temperature should be 205-210F). Remove to a cooling rack and rotate gently from side to side every 5 minutes or so if it looks like your loaf wants to sink at all in the middle. When cooled for 15 minutes or more, remove from the loaf pan to finish cooling before slicing.
  17. This recipe comes to us from Clare Scheffer. Cake: 1 cup butter 1 cup water 2 cups gluten-free flour mix 2 cups sugar 2 eggs beaten ½ cup gluten-free sour cream 1 teaspoon gluten-free almond extract 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon baking soda ¼ teaspoon baking powder 2 teaspoons xanthan gum Frosting: ½ cup butter ¼ cup milk 4 ½ cups powered sugar ½ teaspoon almond extract Directions: In a large saucepan, bring butter and water to a boil. Remove from heat; whisk in remaining cake ingredients until smooth. Pour into greased 15 x 10 x 1 inch baking pan (jelly roll pan). Bake at 375F for 20-22 minutes or until cake is golden brown and tests done. Cool for 20 minutes. Meanwhile, for frosting, combine milk and butter in a medium saucepan and bring to a boil. Remove from heat. Add sugar and almond extract. Mix well. Spread over warm cake.
  18. Ingredients: 1 can white kidney beans 1 tablespoon garlic 3 tablespoon lemon juice 2 tablespoon tahini ¼ cup olive oil ¼ cup water Pinch cayenne ½ tablespoon salt Directions: Blend all ingredients together until it is the consistency of pudding. Let stand at room temperature for one hour before serving.
  19. This recipe comes to us from Cory Bates 3 Eggs 1 teaspoon vinegar ¼ cup oil 1 1/8 cup water 3 1/3 cup gluten-free flour mix 3 tablespoon sugar 1 ½ teaspoon Salt 2/3 cup dry milk 2 ¼ teaspoon active dry yeast Add all wet ingredients to bowl, mix well, and set aside. Combine all dry ingredients in another bowl and mix well. Slowly add dry ingredients to liquid stirring constantly. Beat for several (5-7) minutes with a mixer or vigorously by hand to insure complete mixing. The dough will be the consistency of very thick cake batter. Place dough in slightly greased bowl, cover, and set in warm place. Allow to rise until about double in size. Punch the dough down and fold out into bread pan coated with cooking spray. Smooth out any bumps on top of dough ball with your finger. Cover and allow to rise until about double. Place in 375 degree preheated oven for 35 minutes. Cover top of bread with aluminum foil and bake an additional 20 minutes. Enjoy! This recipe also works well in bread machines. Set to normal cycle, large loaf size and follow directions for your bread maker. Make sure that all the ingredients are well blended during the mixing stage by checking periodically and pushing any remaining dry ingredients downward with a rubber spatula being very careful not to touch the mixing blade. The flour formulation worked well with muffins, cookies and biscuits as well. 1:1 substitution for normal flour gave good results in these recipes.
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