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Found 5 results

  1. Celiac.com 03/08/2018 - A team of researchers recently set out to study delays in diagnosing patients who have biopsy-proven celiac disease with gastrointestinal complaints, compared to those without non-gastrointestinal complaints. The research team included Marco A. Paez, MD, Anna Maria Gramelspacher, MD, James Sinacore, PhD, Laura Winterfield, MD, and Mukund Venu, MD. They are variously affiliated with the Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Howard College of Medicine, Washington, DC; the Department of Medicine, the Department of Public Health Sciences, the Division of Gastroenterology, and the Department of Medicine at Loyola University Medical Center in Maywood, Illinois. The research team first conducted a medical chart review of 687 adult patients diagnosed with celiac disease. All patients they studied had biopsy-proven celiac disease and were grouped according to presence or absence of gastrointestinal symptoms before diagnosis. The team found 101 biopsy-proven celiac patients that met their study criteria. The groups were roughly equal in size, with 52 patients showing gastrointestinal symptoms before diagnosis, and 49 with no gastrointestinal symptoms. The results for the groups were starkly different. Statistical analysis revealed an average diagnosis delay of 2.3 months for the group with gastrointestinal symptoms, while the group that showed no symptoms showed an average delay of 42 months. That’s a difference of nearly 3½ years. Nearly half of the patients with non-gastrointestinal symptoms had abnormal thyroid-stimulating hormone, as opposed to 15.5% in the gastrointestinal symptom group (P = .004). Nearly 70% of patients without gastrointestinal symptoms had anemia, compared with just 11.5% of the group with gastrointestinal symptoms. Also, nearly 70% of patients in the non-gastrointestinal symptom group showed abnormal bone density scans, compared with 41% in the gastrointestinal symptom group. The team saw no sex differences on chi-squared analysis between the 2 groups. Although there is growing awareness of celiac disease, the delay in diagnosis for patients without gastrointestinal symptoms remains prolonged, with an average delay of 3.5 years for celiac diagnosis, compared with just over two months for those with symptoms. Clearly, more needs to be done with regard to diagnosing celiac disease in patients who show no symptoms. On the upside, researchers are currently working on ways to better diagnose celiac disease via faster, more accurate tests, even in patients who have already gone gluten-free. Source: PlumX Metrics
  2. Celiac.com 06/05/2017 - Doctors diagnose celiac disease by confirming various clinical, genetic, serologic, and duodenal morphology features. Based on retrospective data, recent pediatric guidelines propose eliminating biopsy for patients with IgA-TTG levels more than 10-times the upper limit of normal (ULN), along with a few other criteria. One retrospective study showed that researchers using levels of IgA-TTG and total IgA, or IgA-TTG and IgG against deamidated gliadin (IgG-DGL) could identify patients both with and without celiac disease. A team of researchers recently set out to validate the positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV) of these diagnostic procedures. The research team included Johannes Wolf, David Petroff, Thomas Richter, Marcus KH. Auth, Holm H. Uhlig, Martin W. Laass, Peter Lauenstein, Andreas Krahl, Norman Händel, Jan de Laffolie, Almuthe C. Hauer, Thomas Kehler, Gunter Flemming, Frank Schmidt, Astor Rodriques, Dirk Hasenclever, and Thomas Mothes. Their team conducted a prospective study of 898 children undergoing duodenal biopsy analysis to confirm or rule out celiac disease at 13 centers in Europe. They then compared results from antibody tests with results from biopsies, follow-up data, and diagnoses made by the pediatric gastroenterologists. In all cases, diagnosis was made for celiac disease, no celiac disease, or no final diagnosis. Blinded researchers measured levels of IgA-TTG, IgG-DGL, and endomysium antibodies, while tissue sections were analyzed by local and blinded reference pathologists. The team validated two procedures for diagnosis: total-IgA and IgA-TTG, as well as IgG-DGL with IgA-TTG. Patients whose antibody concentrations for all tests were below 1-fold the ULN were assigned to the no celiac disease category. Those whose antibody concentrations for at least one test were above 10-fold the ULN were assigned to the celiac disease category. All other cases were considered to require biopsy analysis. The team calculated the ULN values using the cut-off levels suggested by the test kit manufacturers. They conducted HLA-typing for 449 participants. To extrapolate the PPV and NPV to populations with lower rates of celiac disease, they used models that accounted for how specificity values change with prevalence. In all, the team found 592 patients with celiac disease, 345 who did not have celiac disease, and 24 with no final diagnosis. The TTG-IgA procedure identified celiac disease patients with a PPV of 0.988 and an NPV of 0.934. The TTG-DGL procedure identified celiac disease patients with a PPV of 0.988 and an NPV of 0.958. Their extrapolation model estimated that PPV and NPV would remain above 0.95 even at a disease prevalence as low as 4%. Meanwhile, tests for endomysium antibodies and HLA type did not increase the PPV of samples with levels of IgA-TTG 10-fold or more above the ULN. Interestingly, the pathologists disagreed in their analyses of duodenal morphology about 4.2% of the time, a rate comparable to the error rate for serologic tests. This study validates the use of the TTG-IgA procedure and the TTG-DGL procedure in lieu of biopsy to diagnose pediatric patients with or without celiac disease. Source: Gastroenterology. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1053/j.gastro.2017.04.023 The researchers are variously affiliated with the Institute of Laboratory Medicine, Clinical Chemistry and Molecular Diagnostics, Medical Faculty of the University and University Hospital, Leipzig, Germany, the Institute for Medical Informatics, Statistics & Epidemiology (IMISE), University of Leipzig, Germany, the Department of Paediatrics, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom, the Translational Gastroenterology Unit, Nuffield Department of Medicine, University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, United Kingdom, the, University Children's Hospital Halle, Germany, the Medical School, Hannover, Germany, Helios Hospital, Department of Paediatrics, Plauen, Germany, the Children's Hospital Prinzessin Margaret, Darmstadt, Germany, the University Children's Hospital Graz, Austria, the Children's Hospital, Justus Liebig University Giessen, Germany, the University Children's Hospital Leipzig, Germany, the Children's Hospital of the Clinical Centre Sankt Georg Leipzig, Germany, the Clinical Trial Centre, University of Leipzig, Germany, the DKD Helios Children's Hospital, German Clinic for Diagnostics, Wiesbaden, Germany, the University Children's Hospital, Technical University Dresden, Germany, and the Alder Hey Children's National Health Service Foundation Trust, Liverpool, United Kingdom.
  3. Celiac.com 04/21/2017 - Adults who have gluten sensitivities cohabitating with non-gluten sensitive adults may have a lot of unanswered questions that need to be asked. Dramatic changes in one family member's diet can have profound effects on a household (Bacigalupe & Plocha, 2015). Numerous studies document how parents and children handle everyday living when the child has food intolerances, but very few studies focus on adults living with food sensitivities. Wouldn't you like to know how other adults with food sensitivities adapt and manage over the long haul? Questions like: Does the person with the sensitivity live in fear of cross-contamination? Does the household employ methods to ensure s/he is safe? If so, what are those methods? Do the non-sensitive members of the household feel resentment? Or have they grown weary of compliance over the long haul? How adherent is the sensitive adult? Is it worth a little risk for a little pleasure once in a while? What do these cohabitating adults do to exist gracefully? These questions will be asked in a forthcoming study (on Celiac.com), and the results will be shared with viewers/readers. Food allergies affect 15 million Americans (FARE, 2015), which means that adults with food sensitivities have gone from being rare to more commonplace as the population ages (Norling, 2012). Dietary restrictions due to disease will soon become common in many households and this can be problematic because severe dietary constraints are positively associated with diminished family social activities (Komulainen, 2010). Studies indicate that adults cohabitating, when one has food sensitivities and others do not, could potentially result in problems between members of the household creating feelings of uncertainty and potentially less adherence to the diet. Regimented dietary requirements affect the quality of life when virtually every bite of food must be scrutinized before consumption. For some households, compliance may fall on the shoulders of the person who cooks. The cook in the household, caregivers, and everyone sharing the same kitchen, must be actively involved in protecting the person with the sensitivities keeping gluten-containing crumbs off the counter, out of condiment jars, thoroughly cleaning utensils, etc. (Crowley, 2012; Bollinger, 2005; Merras-Salmino et al., 2014). Of course, those living with sensitivities know there is a lot more to staying "clean and safe." Family members who share a home with someone with pervasive food sensitivities must express empathy to ensure harmony and compliance (Komulainen, 2010). However, compliance comes with a price -- every meal must be planned and cooked using alternative ingredients to avoid accidental ingestion. This takes diligence, education and ability to accomplish meal after meal (Jackson et al., 1985) especially when allergies are to ubiquitous foods such as dairy, soy, gluten or corn. Dietary restrictions can cause misgivings on the part of the other family members, who may feel deprived of their favorite foods, compromised with recipe adaptations, or forced to unwillingly comply with the other person's diet. On the contrary, the person with food sensitivity may feel pressure not to comply with the diet in order to conform to the other adult's culinary demands. In the Jackson et al. study, forty percent of people with Celiac disease did not comply with the diet because it was too difficult (1985). The relationship between the cohabitating adults may be further complicated as trust issues develop between the sensitive adult and the cook, if the sensitive adult suspects foods that make them sick are creeping into their diet. Other food-sensitive adults report non-adherence because it is "too much trouble" and causes "social isolation" (Coulson, 2007). Non-adherence for those with sensitivities can lead to reactions, anaphylactic shock and even to death (Lee et al., 2003). Even those who do not react immediately risk long-term illness with non-compliance. In my twelve years experience working with people in this arena, I have observed that dietary adherence in the household seems to go through phases. The first phase is what I'm calling the "transition" stage when a person is newly diagnosed, and everyone in the household is learning the new rules. The second stage is the "status quo" stage where cohabitants understand, and hopefully comply. Finally, the third stage is what I'm terming as 'turbulent' when other adult household inhabitants are feeling weary of compliance, may have doubts about the other's sensitivities, or even rebel. This stage may be triggered by an event that disrupts the "status quo", such as a holiday where traditional foods are expected, and where their gluten-free substitutions may not be as satisfying to the other household members. It may be triggered when the food sensitive adult decides they may be reacting to different foods than they thought before, and want to experiment with dietary changes. Dynamics between cohabitants may become turbulent during these times. After the event, the household adjusts back to equilibrium until the next triggering event, which throws them into a different part of this phase-cycle, where they may cheerfully welcome a "transition," or react with "turbulence." This cyclical pattern seems to continue as cohabitants move in and out of phases as life-events occur. One of the goals of this survey will be to determine the validity of this cycle. I also want to test the hypothesis that a component of household compliance may also be associated with the status of the adult who has the dietary restrictions – whether the head of the home enjoys full household compliance, or if a subordinate adult must comply while others are eating the foods s/he are sensitive to. Another factor that may affect compliance is how the sensitive adult was initially diagnosed. Did a medical doctor conduct tests? Or did they read an article, and notice that they had symptoms consistent with gluten sensitivity and decide to go "gluten free?" Does the diagnostic process affect the compliance of the other adult members of the household? There are many factors that need to be assessed in order to help those of us who have food sensitivities who are living with other adults. This survey/study will focus on family interactions when dealing with dietary restrictions, with the potential to increase family member's compliance. It will seek to gain insight on the impact food restrictions for one adult has on the rest of the family. This study has social significance because family unity in the future may rely on developing constructs for compliance to address this emerging social problem. I'll collect data for this study and then share it with Celiac.com and the Journal of Gluten Sensitivity readers in order to create awareness by thoroughly examining the lifestyle of food sensitive people, shedding light on how social influences affect dietary adherence. As a PhD student at the University of Denver, and an adult with Celiac disease and a lifetime of other food allergies, living with another adult who has no food sensitivities, I know first-hand that it takes cooperation and commitment from everyone to ensure my health. I hope the study can help others improve their quality of life with the insight gained from conducting this study. I'll be launching this study on Celiac.com. Thank you to Scott Adams for allowing this study to be conducted on Celiac.com.
  4. Celiac.com 01/09/2017 - Some researchers have criticized the usefulness of the 7 level Marsh-Oberhuber classification of mucosal damage in patients with celiac disease. Even though assessing duodenal biopsies with dissecting microscopy is a somewhat crude method, it can provide useful information in cases of obvious villous atrophy. For the past 15 years, one research team has analyzed duodenal biopsies with dissecting microscopy before sending them to the pathology department for histology. Their feeling is that, if dissecting microscopy and traditional histology were comparable, the grading of the histological lesion would be unnecessary, or even pointless, for proper diagnosis of most enteropathies. That research team recently set out to settle that question. The team included F Biagi, C Vattiato, M Burrone, A Schiepatti, S Agazzi, G Maiorano, O Luinetti, C Alvisi, C Klersy, and GR Corazza. They are variously affiliated with the First Department of Internal Medicine, the Biometry and Statistics, the Department of Pathology at University of Pavia, Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, Pavia, Italy; and with the Department of Translational Medicine, Università del Piemonte Orientale, Novara, Italy. They conducted a retrospective analysis of the clinical notes of all 2,075 patients undergoing duodenal biopsy between September 1999 and June 2015. They collected and statistically compared the results of duodenal mucosal evaluation with both dissecting microscopy and traditional histology. Their results, using κ statistics, showed a substantial agreement of the two methods (κ statistics 0.78). Sensitivity of dissecting microscopy for detection of severe villous atrophy was 85.1% (95% CI 81.2% to 88.5%) and specificity was 95% (95% CI 93.8% to 96%). Although dissecting microscopy is no substitute for traditional histology, these results suggest that most celiac disease-related and other flat enteropathies can be sufficiently diagnosed without grading villous atrophy. Source: J Clin Pathol. 2016 Dec;69(12):1051-1054. doi: 10.1136/jclinpath-2016-203711. Epub 2016 May 4.
  5. Hey, I am new here. I been having many symptoms celiacs disease, including clasic and non classic symptoms, neurological problems and even Alopecia Totalis (since the age of 19, no eyebrows etc). However, my CBC, Iron and B12 are allways normal. I have had low Iron levels once, when I was a kid, but when I do my routine blood tests each year, theyare fine.. Althoug, I have had low levels of potasium good few times, but they werent above the norm. I recived my CBC, b12, Iron blood results just few days, stil waiting for my antibody results to come back in few weeks. My symptoms I experience are: Frequent infections, colds (every year) Alopecia universalis (Not even one hair on the body) Eczemas Nail problems Fungal infections Spots Frequent nasal bleeds (especially when I was a kid) Bloating, gas, GERD, fatty stools, diarhea Enamel problems Lip sores Hot flushes Cold hands and feet Nasal congestion Dry skin Sore eyes Heat intolerance Swolen neck lymph nodes Bleeding gums Bruising Blacking out when standing Dizzines during physical activity Dandruff ADD, brain fog, anxiety, severe depression, extreme fatigue, memory problems, panic attacks when I was a kid. etc.. Weight gain and loss Unable to gain muscle So my main concern was, if it is possible to have Celiac without ANEMIA, folate or b12 deffency? I really wish it was Celiac, this would mean a possible end of my problems. As I am 23 yo and been feeling like an old man since I was a little kid.. P.S. I got my thyroid checked few times and all came clear.Not sure if thyroid tests can show Heshimotos though. My GP thinks that I am a hypocondriac, so do I sometimes..
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