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Found 26 results

  1. Celiac.com 10/18/2018 - A team of researchers recently set out to investigate the prevalence of human leukocyte antigens (HLA) DQ2 and DQ8 haplotypes, two common polymorphisms associate with celiac disease, in women who have had previous stillbirth, but who do not have celiac disease. The research team included Mauro Cozzolino, Caterina Serena, Antonino Salvatore Calabró, Elena Savi Marianna, Pina Rambaldi, Serena Simeone, and Serena Ottanelli, Giorgio Mello, Giovanni Rombolá, Gianmarco Troiano, Nicola Nante, Silvia Vannuccini, Federico Mecacci, and Felice Petraglia. They are variously affiliated with the Division of Obstetrics and Gynecology, and the Department of Experimental and Clinical Biomedical Sciences, Gastroenterology Unit, at Careggi University Hospital, University of Florence in Florence, Italy. For their study, the team enrolled 56 women with history of unexplained term stillbirth referred to our Center for High‐Risk Pregnancies for a preconception counseling. As a control group, they enrolled 379 women with previous uncomplicated pregnancies. They excluded women with celiac women from the study. The team then conducted genetic tests for HLA DQ2/DQ8 on both groups, and compared patients data against controls. They found that 50% of women with history of unexplained term stillbirth tested positive for HLA‐DQ2 or DQ8, compared with just 29.5% for controls. Women with HLA DQ8 genotype showed a substantially higher risk of stillbirth (OR: 2.84 CI: 1.1840‐6.817). For patients with the DQ2 genotype, the OR for stillbirth was even higher, at 4.46 with a CI of 2.408‐8.270. In the stillbirth group, the team found that SGA neonates in 85.7% those with HLA‐DQ2/DQ8 haplotypes, and in just 42.8% with negative genetic testing. The team found significantly higher rates of HLA DQ2/DQ8 haplotypes in women with history of unexplained term stillbirth than in women with previous uneventful pregnancies. Moreover, they found that HLA DQ2/DQ8 positivity was significantly associated with suboptimal fetal growth in intrauterine fetal death cases, as shown by an increased prevalence of SGA babies. This study will definitely be of interest to women with HLA DQ2/DQ8 haplotypes, and to those who have experienced unexplained stillbirths. Stay tuned for more information on this important topic as news becomes available. Read more at: American Journal of Reproductive Immunology
  2. Celiac.com 12/03/2014 - It is important for pregnant women seeking medical consultation to get good, evidence-based information. This is especially true for pregnant women with celiac disease, who might wonder whether they face an increased risk of adverse birth outcomes and pregnancy complications as a result of their disease. So, does celiac disease increase a woman’s risk for pregnancy complications and adverse birth outcomes? Until now, there hasn’t been much good, solid data to give women a clear answer. With that in mind, a research team in England recently conducted a population-based study on pregnancy outcomes and adverse birth conditions in women with celiac disease. The research team included Alyshah Abdul Sultan PhD, Laila J Tata PhD, Kate M. Fleming PhD, Colin J. Crooks PhD, Jonas F. Ludvigsson PhD, Nafeesa N. Dhalwani PhD, Lu Ban PhD, and Joe West PhD. They are variously affiliated with the Division of Epidemiology and Public Health, City Hospital Campus at the University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK; the Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden; and with the Department of Paediatrics at Örebro University Hospital in Örebro, Sweden. The team used linked primary care data from the Clinical Practice Research Datalink and secondary care Hospital Episode Statistics data to assess all singleton pregnancies between 1997 and 2012. They used logistic/multinomial regression to compare pregnancies of women with and without celiac disease for risks of pregnancy complications (antepartum and postpartum hemorrhage, pre-eclampsia, and mode of delivery), and for adverse birth outcomes (preterm birth, stillbirth, and low birth weight). They stratified risk levels based on whether women were diagnosed or undiagnosed before delivery. They found 363,930 pregnancies resulting in a live birth or stillbirth, 892 (0.25%) of which were among women with celiac disease. Women with diagnosed celiac disease showed no increased risk of pregnancy complications or adverse birth outcomes compared with women without celiac disease. However, pregnant women with diagnosed celiac disease did show a higher risk of postpartum hemorrhage and assisted delivery, with an adjusted odds ratio (aOR) of 1.34. Importantly, the team found no increased risk of any pregnancy complication among those with undiagnosed celiac disease. In all, they found just a 1% absolute excess risk of preterm birth and low birth weight among mothers with undiagnosed celiac disease, which corresponds to aOR=1.24 (95% confidence interval (CI)=0.82–1.87) and aOR=1.36 (95% CI=0.83–2.24), respectively. Overall, the results of this study offer some good news to pregnant women with celiac disease. Whether diagnosed or undiagnosed during pregnancy, celiac disease is not associated with a significantly higher risk of pregnancy complications and adverse birth outcomes. Source: Am J Gastroenterol. 2014;109:1653-1661.
  3. Celiac.com 07/23/2018 - Celiac disease has been associated with several conditions influencing female reproduction and pregnancy outcomes including spontaneous abortion and stillbirth. To determine how celiac disease influences women’s reproductive lives, both prior to and after diagnosis, a team of researchers recently set out to assess the risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes, both before and after diagnosis. The research team included L Grode, B H Bech, O Plana-Ripoll, M Bliddal, I E Agerholm, P Humaidan, and C H Ramlau-Hansen. They are variously affiliated with the Department of Medicine, Horsens Regional Hospital, Sundvej 30, DK-8700 Horsens, Denmark; the Department of Public Health, Aarhus University, Bartholins Allé 2, DK-8000 Aarhus C, Denmark; the National Center for Register-based Research, Aarhus University, Fuglesangs Allé 26, DK-8210 Aarhus V, Denmark; with OPEN, Odense Hospital and Department of Clinical Research, University of Southern Denmark, J.B. Winsløws Vej 9 a, 3. etage, DK-5000 Odense C, Denmark; and with the The Fertility Clinic, Horsens Regional Hospital, Sundvej 30, DK-8700 Horsens, Denmark Faculty of Health, Aarhus University, Palle Juul-Jensens Boulevard 82, DK-8200 Aarhus N, Denmark. By linking several Danish national health registers, the research team was able to identify all women diagnosed with celiac disease between 1977 and 2016. To make their assessment, the team compared 6,319 women diagnosed with celiac disease with 63,166 age- and sex-matched non-celiac women. For both groups, the team identified reproductive events between the ages of 15 and 50 years. The team used adjusted stratified Cox and logistic regression models to estimate differences in reproductive outcomes between women with and without celiac disease. They found that women with diagnosed celiac disease had about the same chances as non-celiac women of pregnancy, live birth and risk of stillbirth, molar and ectopic pregnancy, spontaneous abortion and abortion due to fetal disease. However, prior to being diagnosed, celiac disease women had an excess risk of spontaneous abortion equal to 11 extra spontaneous abortions per 1,000 pregnancies (adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 1.12, 95% CI: 1.03, 1.22) and 1.62 extra stillbirths per 1,000 pregnancies (adjusted OR = 1.57, 95% CI: 1.05, 2.33) compared with the non-celiac disease women. In the period 0–2 years prior to diagnosis fewer pregnancies occurred in the undiagnosed celiac disease group, equal to 25 (95% CI: 20–31) fewer pregnancies per 1,000 pregnancies compared to the non-celiac disease group and in addition, fewer undiagnosed celiac disease women initiated ART-treatment in this period, corresponding to 4.8 (95% CI: 0.9, 8.7) fewer per 1000 women compared to non-celiac disease women. Overall, these findings suggest that undiagnosed celiac disease can influence female reproduction, and that doctors should focus on early celiac detection in at-risk groups. The team adjusted their results for numerous confounding factors, but cannot rule out residual confounding. The team stresses several limitations of the study. For example, they could not confirm the validity of the diagnoses in the registers. They also note that some spontaneous abortions will go unnoticed or unregistered, while live-births, stillbirths, ectopic and molar pregnancies, and abortion due to fetal disease, are likely to be registered. For these reasons, they urge caution in interpreting these results. Stay tuned for more news on the relationship between celiac disease and female reproduction. Source: Human Reproduction
  4. Celiac.com 09/24/2012 - With all the problems that go along with celiac disease, it can be hard to see any benefits to having the disease. However, it would seem that such benefits do exist: a recent study in Sweden shows that women suffering from celiac disease are actually at a decreased risk of developing breast, endometrial and ovarian cancer. Data was collected from 28 Swedish pathology departments, identifying 17,852 biopsy-diagnosed women diagnosed with celiac disease between the years of 1969 and 2007. Women in the celiac group were age-matched and compared with a control group of 88,400 women. Risk of breast, endometrial and ovarian cancer were all estimated using the Cox regression model in both groups. Results showed an inverse relationship between celiac disease and all three forms of cancer. With breast cancer rates, women with celiac disease had a hazard ratio of 0.89 (meaning for every 100 women in the control group, only 89 in the celiac disease group developed breast cancer). Women with celiac disease also had a hazard ratio of 0.89 for ovarian cancer. For endometrial cancer, the decreased risk was even more pronounced with a hazard ratio of 0.6. All calculations carried a confidence interval of 95%. These numbers became even more pronounced after omitting the first year of followup after diagnosis (presumably the gluten-free diet 'adjustment period'). Breast cancer's hazard ratio fell to 0.82, ovarian cancer's hazard ratio fell to .72 and endometrial cancer's hazard ratio fell to 0.58. The study suggests that this negative correlation could be a result of shared risk factors or early menopause associated with celiac disease. Looking at the numbers though, particularly the 'adjustment period' drop off, one has to wonder if the gluten-free diet has some part to play in this as well. Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21953605
  5. Celiac.com 06/15/2015 - It's well-documented that people with active celiac disease are more likely to have osteoporosis and increased risk of fractures. High-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) allows for three-dimensional exploration of bone micro-architecture, including measurement of cortical and trabecular compartments, and providing detailed information on bone disease pathophysiology and fracture. Using HR-pQCT, research team recently set out to assess the volumetric and micro-architectural characteristics of peripheral bones. that is the distal radius and tibia, in adult pre-menopausal women with active freshly diagnosed celiac disease. The research team included María Belén Zanchetta, Florencia Costa, Vanesa Longobardi, Gabriela Longarini, Roberto Martín Mazure, María Laura Moreno, Horacio Vázquez, Fernando Silveira, Sonia Niveloni, Edgardo Smecuol, María de la Paz Temprano, Hui Jer Hwang, Andrea González, Eduardo César Mauriño, Cesar Bogado, Jose R. Zanchetta, an dJulio César Bai. They are variously affiliated with the IDIM, Instituto de Diagnóstico e Investigaciones Metabólicas, and with the Cátedra de Osteología y Metabolismo Mineral, Universidad del Salvador, Buenos Aires, Argentina. For the study, their team prospectively enrolled 31 consecutive premenopausal women with newly diagnosed celiac disease (median age 29 years, range: 18–49) and 22 healthy women of similar age (median age 30 years, range 21–41) and body mass index. Using HR-pQCT, the team was able to successfully identify significant deterioration in the micro-architecture of trabecular and cortical compartments of peripheral bones. HR-pQCT revealed that most bone micro-architecture parameters were substantially reduced in celiac disease patients compared to a control group. Twenty-two patients showed symptomatic celiac disease. These patients had a greater bone micro-architectural deficit than those with sub-clinical celiac disease. Impaired bone micro-architecture could be one cause of diminished bone strength and higher risk of fractures seen in many celiac patients. The researchers are looking to conduct a follow-up of this group of patients. They want to know whether bone micro-architecture recovers with a gluten-free diet, and, if so, how quickly and to what extent. Source: BONE July 2015, Volume 76, Pages 149–157. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bone.2015.03.005
  6. This article originally appeared in the Autumn 2002 edition of Celiac.coms Scott-Free newsletter. At the University of Chicago Celiac Disease Program, women with celiac disease who have recently become pregnant often contact us. Remarkably, the questions we receive from these women seldom stray from one issue, that is, whether or not to maintain a gluten-free diet while pregnant. Most women mistakenly believe that the gluten-free diet will deprive their developing fetus with the nutrients it needs, and hurt the growing baby. In fact, for a pregnant woman with celiac disease, remaining ON the gluten-free diet is the best and only option for the health of mother and child. The gluten-free diet provides pregnant women and their babies with all of the nutrients they need to grow and be healthy. Fortunately, for all concerned, there have been excellent research studies on fertility, pregnancy and celiac disease conducted by top-notch investigators around the world. While this important research has mainly focused on women, it is important to note that researchers have established (since the 1950s) that men also suffer from infertility due to undiagnosed celiac disease. Celiac Disease and Fertility In research studies to date, the incidence of celiac disease in women with unexplained infertility has been estimated at four to eight percent. While a number of studies have demonstrated that unexplained infertility can be successfully treated with the gluten-free diet, others have shown that there are factors other than malabsorption of nutrients that result in infertility, delayed menarche (the start of the menstrual cycle) and early menopause. In two large case control studies, researchers examined the incidence of delayed menarche, amenorrhea (cessation of the menstrual cycle for short periods of time), and early menopause. Both studies enrolled women with celiac disease who were following the gluten-free diet or eating a gluten-containing diet. They found that women who were not on the gluten-free diet started their menstrual cycle up to a year and a half later than women with celiac disease who were following the diet. In addition, researchers found that up to 39% of women not on the diet experienced periods of amenorrhea, compared to only nine percent of women who were on the gluten-free diet. As you would expect, women with celiac disease who were not on the gluten-free diet were found to enter menopause four to five years earlier than women with celiac disease who were on the diet. Researchers who have studied women with infertility have found that they test positive for celiac disease-related antibodies at a rate that is ten-fold higher than the normal population. They have also demonstrated that women with infertility who are diagnosed with celiac disease do not always exhibit iron, B-12, or folate deficiencies, which points to other celiac disease-related explanations for the development of their infertility. Celiac Disease and Pregnancy Researchers have also studied the effect of the gluten-free diet in pregnant women with celiac disease, in order to determine any impact on the developing fetus and the pregnancy outcome. In a study of 25 patients and 60 pregnancies researchers found that 21% of women who were not on the gluten-free diet experienced pregnancy loss, and 16% of women experienced fetal growth restriction. Researchers also remarked, however, that successful pregnancies occurred before and after diagnoses for many women in the study. In a large Danish study with 211 infants and 127 mothers with celiac disease, researchers found that the mean birth weight of children born to mothers on a gluten-containing diet was significantly lower than babies born to mothers without celiac disease. Interestingly, this same study determined that women on the gluten-free diet gave birth to children weighing more than those born to mothers without celiac disease! In a case-control study that looked at the effect of the gluten-free diet on pregnancy and lactation, investigators learned that women with celiac disease who were not on the gluten-free diet experienced pregnancy loss at a rate of 17.8%, compared to 2.4% of women with celiac disease who were on the gluten-free diet. These researchers found that there was no difference in the occurrence of pregnancy and fertility problems in women with sub-clinical (positive blood test, negative biopsy) or clinical disease (positive blood test, positive biopsy). Finally, in a group of women with celiac disease who had been pregnant more than once, researchers looked at the effect of the gluten-free diet on their future pregnancies. They concluded that the institution of the gluten-free diet upon diagnosis caused a relative 35.6% drop in pregnancy loss, 29.4% drop in low-birth weight babies and an increase of two and a half months of breastfeeding. While the malabsorption of nutrients is not the only cause of fertility and pregnancy-related problems for women with celiac disease, the gluten-free diet is essential to improving the health of women and their babies.
  7. Celiac.com 09/22/2016 - There really hasn't been much study done on diagnostic delays and factors associated with celiac disease, as well as on its potential impact on the course of disease. To get a better idea of the issue, a research team recently conducted a large systematic patient survey study among unselected celiac disease patients in Switzerland. The research team included SR Vavricka SR, N Vadasz, M Stotz, R Lehmann, D Studerus, T Greuter, P Frei, J Zeitz, M Scharl, B Misselwitz, D Pohl, M Fried, R Tutuian, A Fasano, AM Schoepfer, G Rogler, and L Biedermann. They are variously affiliated with the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology at Triemli Hospital Zurich in Zurich, Switzerland, IG Zöliakie, Basel, Switzerland, the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology at University Hospital Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland, the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Gastroenterology Bethanien, Zurich, Switzerland, the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Spital Tiefenau, Bern, Switzerland, the Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, MassGeneral Hospital for Children, Boston, USA,and with the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Hospital Lausanne - CHUV, Lausanne, Switzerland. They broke their study down into patient-associated delays, and doctor-associated delays. They found an average total diagnostic delay of 87/24 months (IQR 5-96), with a range from 0 up to 780 months, which was fairly equally divided between doctor delay and patient delay. Both mean/median total (93.1/24 vs. 60.2/12, p<0.001) and doctors' (41.8/3 vs. 23.9/2, p<0.001) diagnostic delay were significantly higher when comparing female vs. male patients, and interestingly patients' delay was similar even after an irritable bowel syndrome diagnosis. Patients with a diagnostic delay shorter than 2 years showed a substantially lower dependence on steroids and/or immunosuppressants, better substitution for any nutritional deficiency, and were more likely to be symptom-free between 6 and 12 months after diagnosis. Regular, substantial delays in diagnosing celiac disease, are linked to worse clinical outcomes, and this data shows that such delays are significantly longer in female patients. This increased diagnostic delay in women is the fault of doctors, not patients, in part because the delay statistics cannot be explained by a diagnosis of IBS prior to celiac disease diagnosis. Source: Dig Liver Dis. 2016 Jun 23. pii: S1590-8658(16)30475-3. doi: 10.1016/j.dld.2016.06.016.
  8. Celiac.com 07/27/2011 - Based on associations made between microscopic colitis and celiac disease in scientific literature, but limited population-based data, a team of researchers set out to assess rates of microscopic colitis in celiac disease. The research team included M. Stewart, C. N. Andrews, S. Urbanski, P. L. Beck, and M. Storr. They were looking to better understand how these two diseases might be connected, and to identify any factors that might cause them to occur together. This led them to conduct a population-based review of all people diagnosed with celiac disease and microscopic colitis in a large Canadian medical center over a 5-year period. To do that, they searched endoscopy and pathology databases to find all diagnosis made for celiac disease and microscopic colitis within the Calgary Health Region between 2004 and 2008. To get accurate results, they made sure to standardize age and gender data from their study with 2006 Canadian Census data. They then used standardized incidence ratios (SIR) to figure out how often the two disease occur together. In the study population, they found, over a five-year period, 763 patients diagnosed with celiac disease, and 1106 diagnosed with microscopic colitis. In the general population, the standard rates of celiac disease ran from 10.4 to 15.7 per 100,000 people, while the standard rates of microscopic colitis ran from 16.9 to 26.2 per 100,000 people. The study team found 40 patients with both celiac disease and microscopic colitis, 21 of whom were females aged 40–60 years. In the celiac disease group, microscopic colitis occurred at an annual rate of 11.4 per 1000 cases of celiac disease with an overall SIR of 52.7. These findings showed a strong association between microscopic colitis and celiac disease. In fact, the diseases occurred together in the study population at rates of about 50-times those expected in the general population. One prominent finding was that middle-aged women suffered especially high rates of celiac disease together with microscopic colitis. Therefore, the team recommends that middle-aged women with celiac disease and persistent diarrhea undergo lower endoscopy with biopsies to check for microscopic colitis. Source: Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics. 2011;33(12):1340-1349.
  9. Celiac.com 10/26/2015 - Patients with active celiac disease are more likely to have osteoporosis and a higher risk of bone fractures. High-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) permits three-dimensional exploration of bone micro-architectural characteristics measuring separately cortical and trabecular compartments, and gives a more profound insight into bone disease pathophysiology and fracture. A research team recently assessed the volumetric and micro-architectural aspects of peripheral bones-distal radius and tibia-in an adult premenopausal cohort with active celiac disease assessed at diagnosis. The research team included MB Zanchetta, F Costa, V Longobardi, G Longarini, RM Mazure, ML Moreno, H Vázquez, F Silveira, S Niveloni, E Smecuol, MdeL Temprano, HJ Hwang, A González, EC Mauriño, C Bogado, JR Zanchetta, and JC Bai. They are variously affiliated with IDIM, Instituto de Diagnóstico e Investigaciones Metabólicas, Buenos Aires, Argentina, the Sección Intestino Delgado, Departamento de Medicina, Hospital de Gastroenterología "Dr. C. Bonorino Udaondo", Buenos Aires, Argentina; and the Cátedra de Gastroenterología Facultad de Medicina, Universidad del Salvador, Buenos Aires, Argentina. For their study, the team prospectively enrolled 31 consecutive premenopausal women, between 18-49 years of age, with newly diagnosed celiac disease, and 22 healthy women of similar age and body mass index. Compared with controls the peripheral bones of celiac disease patients showed significantly lower total density mg/cm(3). Celiac patients also showed significantly lower cortical densit in both regions. Although celiac patients also showed lower cortical thickness, there was no significant inter-group difference (a-8% decay with p 0.11 in both bones). The 22 patients with symptomatic celiac disease showed a greater bone micro-architectural deficit than those with subclinical, or "silent" celiac disease. The team used HR-pQCT identify significant deterioration in the micro-architecture of trabecular and cortical compartments of peripheral bones. Overall, impairment was marked by lower trabecular number and thickness, which increased trabecular network heterogeneity, and lower cortical density and thickness. The team notes that they expect a follow-up on this group of patients to reveal whether a gluten-free diet promotes bone healing, and if so, to what extent. Source: Bone. 2015 Jul;76:149-57. doi: 10.1016/j.bone.2015.03.005. Epub 2015 Mar 14.
  10. Celiac.com 01/09/2012 - Women with celiac disease face a higher risk for depression than the general population, even once they have adopted a gluten-free diet, according to U.S. researchers. A team of researchers recently used a Web-mediated survey to assess a range of physical, behavioral and emotional experiences in 177 U.S. adult women, who reported a physician-provided diagnosis of celiac disease. The team was led by Josh Smyth, professor of biobehavioral health and medicine at Pennsylvania State University, and included members from Syracuse University and Drexel University. The survey gathered information about how closely people follow a gluten-free diet and assessed various symptoms of celiac disease from physical symptoms to the respondents' experience and management of stressful situations, along with charting symptoms of clinical depression and frequency of thoughts and behaviors associated with eating and body image. Perhaps unsurprisingly, many women with celiac disease suffer from disordered eating, given that the management of celiac disease requires careful attention to diet and food, Smyth said. "What we don't know is what leads to what and under what circumstances," Smyth said. "It's likely that the disease, stress, weight, shape and eating issues, and depression are interconnected." The findings are forthcoming in the journal of Chronic Illness. Source: http://www.upi.com/Health_News/2011/12/28/Celiac-ups-depression-risk-for-women/UPI-75401325131984/#ixzz1iQynze9k.
  11. Celiac.com 04/27/2015 - We know that women with infertility have higher rates of celiac disease than women who are not infertile. There's been some evidence to suggest that celiac disease might have impact women's reproductive health. However, the quest for more solid answers continues. A team of researchers recently set out to assess fertility and outcomes of pregnancy among women with celiac disease. The research team included Stephanie M. Moleski, Christina C. Lindenmeyer, J. Jon Veloski, Robin S. Miller, Cynthia L. Miller, David Kastenberg, and Anthony J. DiMarino. The team crafted a retrospective cohort study in which they analyzed information gathered from patients at a tertiary care celiac center, along with information gathered from members of two national celiac disease awareness organizations. A group of women without celiac disease served as control subjects. Both groups answered an anonymous online survey of 43 questions about menstrual history, fertility, and pregnancy outcomes. The group included 329 women with small bowel biopsy-confirmed celiac disease and 641 control subjects. Of the 970 women included in the study, 733 (75.6%) reported that they had been pregnant at some point. In terms of pregnancy, there was no significant difference between women with celiac disease (n=245/329, 74.5%) and controls (488/641, 76.1%; P=0.57). However, fewer women with celiac disease than controls (79.6% vs. 84.8%) reported giving birth following 1 or more pregnancies (P=0.03). Women with celiac disease had higher rates of spontaneous abortion than did control subjects (50.6% vs. 40.6%; P=0.01). Women with celiac disease also had higher rates of premature delivery, at 23.6% compared to 15.9% among controls (P=0.02). The average age at menarche was a bit higher in the celiac disease group, at 12.7 years, than in the control group, which came in at 12.4 years (P=0.01). This retrospective cohort analysis examining reproductive features of women with celiac disease, found that celiac disease was associated with significant increases in spontaneous abortion, premature delivery, and later age of menarche. Source: Ann Gastroenterol 2015; 28 (2): 236-240
  12. Celiac.com 03/04/2015 - Women with infertility face higher rates of celiac disease, according to a recent data analysis. Until now, data connecting celiac disease and infertility has been contradictory. There are currently no recommendations regarding celiac disease screening in female patients with infertility. A research team recently conducted a meta-analysis to find out whether women with infertility have a higher risk for celiac disease. The team included Prashant Singh MBBS; Shubhangi Arora MBBS; Suman Lal MD; Tor A. Strand MD, PhD; and Govind K. Makharia MD, DM, DNB, MNAMS. To source information for their analysis, the team performed a literature search using the MeSH keywords "celiac disease," "gluten," and "infertility." They based celiac diagnosis on positive patient serology and biopsies showing villous atrophy. The team extracted celiac disease data in 3 groups of women with "all cause" infertility, unexplained infertility, and a group of control subjects. They then calculated pooled odds ratio (OR) and prevalence, with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Of 105 relevant studies, they included five studies for calculation of pooled odds ratio. Four additional studies, where data on controls were not available, were also considered for calculation of pooled rates of celiac disease. The analysis showed that women with infertility had 3.5 times higher odds of having celiac disease compared with the control group (OR=3.5; 95% CI, 1.3-9; P<0.01). Similarly, odds for celiac disease in women with "unexplained infertility" were 6 times greater than for control subjects (OR=6; 95% CI, 2.4-14.6). Of 884 women with infertility, 20 had celiac disease indicating a pooled prevalence of 2.3% (95% CI, 1.4-3.5). Of 623 women with "unexplained infertility," 20 had celiac disease. The pooled prevalence of celiac disease in women with unexplained infertility was 3.2% (95% CI, 2-4.9). Celiac disease is more common in women with what is called "all-cause" infertility and "unexplained" infertility, than in general population. Infertility and unexplained infertility can point to hidden celiac disease. Source: Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology. doi: 10.1097/MCG.0000000000000285
  13. Celiac.com 04/09/2012 - Many people with celiac disease suffer from fatigue and may limit theirsocial activities, both of which can lead to a decrease in physicalactivity, and potentially lower bone mass. A team of medical researchers recently set out to study the effects of exercise and gluten-free diet on bone-mass in women with celiac disease. The research team included Valentina Passanantia, Antonella Santonicolaa, Cristina Buccia, Paolo Andreozzia, Antonella Ranaudoa, Daniel V. Di Giacomoc, and Carolina Ciacci. They are affiliated with the Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine at the University Federico II of Naples, Italy, the Gastrointestinal Unit of Salerno University Medical School in Salerno, Italy, and the Celiac Disease Center of the Department of Medicine at Columbia University in New York. For their study, the team recruited two groups of women. In both groups, they examined physical activity, fatigue and bone mineral density in women with celiac disease, both at diagnosis and while following a gluten-free diet. In the first group of 48 women, the team measured bone mineral density at diagnosis and after 2 years of a gluten-free diet. In the second group, this one with 47 women, researchers measured bone mineral density at diagnosis, and after 5 years of a gluten-free diet. The researchers questioned and assessed both groups regarding physical activity and ranked them on a visual analogue scale regarding their perception of fatigue at diagnosis and follow-up. The team also gathered data on smoking habits, alcohol use, gastrointestinal symptoms, drug therapy and body mass index. Across the board, for all factors, the two groups showed similar results. At follow-up, the mean body mass index and physical activity questionnaire scores were similar to baseline. Both groups showed increased bone density and unchanged scores for physical activity and visual analogue scale. For both groups, bone density improved significantly after two years on a gluten-free diet. In both groups, physical activity was often low and played only a small role in changes to bone mineral density. So, exercise does not seem to help increase bone mineral density in any significant way, and following a gluten-free diet is sufficient to re-establish bone mineral density to healthy levels. Source: 2011 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. doi:10.1016/j.dld.2011.12.012
  14. Celiac.com 01/11/2010 - When I first went on a gluten free diet, my migraines disappeared completely.Forfive wonderful years, I only felt the twinges of a migraine (or maybejust a blessedly “normal” headache) during those few times when Iinadvertently consumed gluten.Another thing also happened once I went on a gluten free diet – I got pregnant. But, five yearslater, I learned that there could be more than one trigger for mymigraines and unfortunately, gluten was only one of them.After two cycles of pregnancy and nursing, my hormones eventually normalized into a regular cycle.Now, that, in and of itself, amazed me, that for the first time in my life my body had learned to have a 4-week textbook cycle.But, along with those cycles came the worst migraines I had ever experienced in my life.I realized, sadly, that gluten wasn’t my only migraine trigger.I could avoid gluten, but I couldn’t avoid my cycle.Theirony of it all struck hard– the gluten free diet had made me healthyenough to have a regular cycle – a regular cycle attached with horrificmigraines.Once again, I was going from doctor to doctor,but this time (unlike the years until my celiac diagnosis), I receiveda fast diagnosis – menstrual migraine.The neurologistwho diagnosed me said that they were probably the worst type ofmigraine out there – very resistant to medication, fierce in theirstrength, and often lasting for days.Well, he hasn’t been wrong. Four years of migraines later, I honestly believe I may have tried every migraine treatment known to woman!I have been searching for a solution in the hope that if I could cure mine, anybody’s could be cured.However,along the way, many of the things I have tried that have temporarilyworked, have worked for others too, with more lasting results.Hence this article – why not share what I’ve learned in the hope that others can be helped?Maybe, too, in this process, someone out there will know of a treatment that I have not yet tried. Before I go on, I dowant to say that staying on the gluten-free diet is the only option tohaving a good life at all – even though it allows the cycles that bringthe migraines.Before going gluten-free, I was sick all the time with migraines.Now I am much healthier, but do get terrible cyclical migraines.I obviously choose the latter. This article focuses on migraine prevention.Ido have in my cabinet some very expensive, strong prescription triptans(Amerge works the best for me) and these are a necessity…simply becauseI do not want to land up in my local emergency room with a migrainethat feels like it’s killing me.I think of the prescriptions as my rescue doses, for those times when all the prevention and care in the world fails. I have tried many,many preventative treatments – supplements, herbs, Chinese medicine,bioidentical hormone pills, natural hormone creams, allergy treatments,massage, chiropractic, and even acupuncture.People swearby massage and acupuncture, I tried it some, but did not perceiveenough of a benefit to continue – the expense alone was giving me amigraine. To date, nothing has taken away my migraines, but the following items have definitely helped.And, the good news is that every item listed is affordable and completely doable! Wakeup at the same time every day. My neurologist has a beautifulexplanation as to why this can prevent a migraine, and it surprisinglyhas nothing to do with low blood sugar! I cannot remember his eloquentexplanation. But, many migraine sufferers will find they get amigraine on their day off – the “Saturday Migraine”. Usually, it’sfrom sleeping in and messing up the sensitive sleep/wake cycle. Myalarm has one setting – for week days as well as weekends. If I’mtired later in the day from getting up early after a late night (whichwould usually happen on a weekend), I do my best to take a nap, but Irarely sleep in. B complex. Every migraine guide you read anywhere, always mentions theB vitamins. As I have already posted, and others have commented,celiacs have low absorption of the B vitamins since often the damagedportion of the small intestine is where absorption of B’s shouldoccur. This can be overcome by taking large doses of B’s. I finallyfound a B-complex I can tolerate, and that’s Solgar B50. They have astronger dose, Solgar B100, but the B50 works for me. B2 is oftensingled out for migraine sufferers, and Solgar makes an isolated B2,but this doesn’t work well for me. It may for you, and at under $10,it’s certainly worth a try – in fact, I wish I could give you some ofmy almost-full bottle to try! Magnesium. I’ve taken magnesiumall along, but recently, from a commercial on the celiac website in themigraine section, I read about Dermamag. (My husband joked with methat purchasing a supplement from an online Ad, was akin to finding adate on the internet, but it does look like this has been a goodthing!) The premise behind Dermamag, is that people with migraines arenot absorbing enough magnesium through their digestive systems (soundslike a celiac to me), and that their “patented” formula is the first ofits kind to deliver it through the skin. Well, $29 and a few dayslater, my first bottle arrived, and I must say, I’ve been quitepleased. It does sting my skin a bit, so I apply it to wet skin, butit has definitely stopped a few days from turning into migraine daysthese past few weeks. I’m hoping that after a few months of use, theoverall benefit will increase. It might work just as well to soak in abath of Epsom salts every night, and it would certainly be cheaper, butyou know, that isn’t a “patented” way to increase your magnesiumlevels!!! Lemon Juice. About three years ago I read a littleside article in an educators magazine, of all places, that women intheir mid-thirties often start experiencing terrible cyclicalheadaches. The article blamed this on our western acidic diets andwent on to say that one of the best ways to counteract an acidic dietis to squeeze lemon in your water. Now, that made about as much senseto me as nothing – since lemons are acidic themselves, but lemons arecheap – much cheaper than the dozens of supplements I have tried overthe years. I have since been told that although they are acidic, theirnet effect in the body is basic (?!!) but illogical logic aside, Istarted squeezing lemons into my water that same day and for THREEMONTHS I did not have one migraine. Of course, you have to be carefulnot to overdo it – too much acid cannot be good for a sensitivestomach. Currently, I consume at least one lemon every day – mostpeople go to the store when they run out of milk, I go when I run outof lemons. I honestly think that at this point in my migraine journey,without “lemon-water” I would have a migraine every day. Vitamin D. I actually break open my vitamin D capsule and rub it on myskin every other day. I know the latest articles are pushing 4000 IU’sof vitamin D a day and higher, but if I take that much (orally ortransdermally) I get welts on my skin. I showed the welts to a healthcare practitioner once and he immediately said they were from excessvitamin D. I reduced my dose and find that 2000IU every other dayseems to be optimum for me. Evening Primrose Oil (EPO) fromHemp Oil. I think, I hope, I pray, that this oil is turning into myown personal magic bullet. A few months ago I purchased some ManitobaHarvest Hemp Oil on the advice of a friend and went 5 weeks without amigraine. I had previously tried a great brand of EPO in the capsuleform, but honestly couldn’t afford to take it in the doses I required. The Hemp Oil, however, brings you the EPO in a nature-made n-3:n-6:n-9fatty acid ratio. When I ran out of the Manitoba harvest, I couldn’tfind it locally, so I bought a different brand and my migrainesreturned. Frustrated, I gave up on it, until just two weeks ago, whensomeone I had suggested try it raved on and on how it was helping themwith PMS. I finally found my original brand, and have been back on itfor 10 days. The difference so far has been amazing, I don’t even feellike I could get a migraine at all! Obviously, time will tell, but fornow I’ll continue to be hopeful. I actually take Nordic Arctic FishOil, too, so I mix a little of each and swallow the whole nasty mess. I have friends who mix it in juice or incorporate it in their food, butI don’t want to ruin the food I’m eating, so I just take it straightand get it over with. A word of caution – EPO has been known to causeuterine contractions, so do not take it if you are pregnant! Finally, and I will not belabor this point since I have have mentionedit in another article, I do take Solgar’s prenatal multivitamin simplybecause it’s the only multi that I can tolerate. And, I only take halfa dose. Calcium, magnesium, vitamin D from Solaray. That’smy personal regime. I have come up with it by research, reading,severe trial and error, and much wasting of money. Hopefully one ofthose items can help you in your quest to become migraine free. Asalways, I would never try more than one new thing at a time, our bodiesare too sensitive and there needs to be time for us to gauge our ownreactions. Good luck, God bless, and I would love to hear of anyof your own personal successes against migraines. Maybe, between allof us, we can beat these things, and instead of counting the yearsuntil menopause, we can enjoy the intervening years gluten AND migrainefree!!!
  15. Celiac.com 05/28/2009 - Dr. MariaPorpora and her fellow researchers in Italy studied a woman backin 2003 who had chronic abdominal and pelvic pain, deep dyspareunia(pain while having sex), and dysmenorrhea (menstruation pain similar tocramps). When she came in to Dr. Porpora’s clinic, she also haddiarrheaand had lost five kilograms in the last six months. Her painwas so bad that she completely avoided having sex. She measured the severity ofher pain on a one to ten scale, with one being low and ten being high: Dysmenorrhea: 10 Chronic pelvic pain: 7 Dysapareunia: 10 Shealso had a “normal cervix, a mobile, anteveted mildly enlarge uteruscaused by myomata (benign tumors), and the absence of adnexal masses(lumps in tissue near the uterus, usually in the ovary or fallopiantube).” The doctors werejustifiably confused, and even performed surgery tohelp relieve the pain, however, after six months her symptoms returned. She wasonly partially responsive to their “analgesic, antispasmodic, andantidepressant” drugs. She had no obvious gynecologic disorder. During subsequent examinations the doctors discovered an issue related to malabsorption, and the patient was tested forgluten antibodies. The results were positive, and the woman was put on a gluten-free diet. After one year on a gluten freediet the woman’s pain disappeared, along with her other symptoms offatigue, depression, and general intestinal issues. Accordingto this article, 40% of cases of pelvic pain in women have no known cause, even if they have been diagnosed with irritable bowelsyndrome or inflammatory bowel diseases. According to the doctors: “Celiac disease should betaken into consideration when a patient presents with unexplainedpelvic pain, dysmenorrhea, or deep dyspareunia if these symptoms areassociated with bowel disorders, even in the absence of a knownintestinal disease.” Reference: Obstetrics and gynecology 2002;99(5 Pt 2):937-9.
  16. 10/05/2009 - Pregnant women with celiac disease suffer early pregnancy loss more often than women without celiac disease. A team of Italian researchers recently set out to look at a possible role of genetic pro-thrombotic variants in early pregnancy loss in women with celiac disease. The research team was made up of C. Ciacci, R. Tortora, O. Scudiero, R. Di Fiore, F. Salvatore, and G. Castaldo. The team looked at 39 women with celiac disease, who had experienced at least two early pregnancy losses within the first 3 months of pregnancy, a control group of 72 celiac women with a history of one or more normal pregnancies with no pregnancy loss. Each of the women were enrolled in the study immediately upon diagnosis for celiac disease, whereupon, the researchers obtained a clinical history obtained from each woman. The researchers then screened leukocyte DNA for factor V Leiden (mutation G1691A), factor V R2 (H1299R), factor II (G20210A), methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) (C677T and A1298C), beta-fibrinogen (−455 G>A), PAI-1 alleles 4G/5G, factor XIII (V34L), and HPA-1 (L33P). Women with pregnancy losses were notably older (p = 0.002) among the celiacs than in controls. Of the gene variants examined, the allelic frequency of 4G variant of PAI-1, and the frequency of mutant genotypes were significantly more frequent in the group of celiac women with early pregnancy loss (p = 0.00003 and 0.028, respectively). Interestingly, the beta-fibrinogen −455 G>A genotype distribution differs substantially between the two groups, though frequency of the variant allele remains the same. The control group showed more frequent variant genotypes (p = 0.009). Based on these data, the research team believes the 4G variant of the PAI-I gene may predispose some celiac women who carry the gene to early pregnancy loss, though they note that their data should be confirmed on larger populations. Digestive and Liver DiseaseVolume 41, Issue 10, October 2009, Pages 717-720
  17. Celiac.com 06/12/2013 - Pregnant women with higher levels of issue transglutaminase (anti-tTG), an antibody common in people with celiac disease, at risk for low fetal and birth weight in their babies, according to a new study in Gastroenterology. A number of studies before this one have confirmed an association between celiac disease and poor growth fetus growth, but very little study had been done as to how the level of celiac disease might affect fetal growth, birth weight or birth outcome. In an effort to better understand how the level of celiac disease affects fetal growth, birth weight, and birth outcome, a team of researchers set out to assess the associations between levels of antibodies against tissue transglutaminase (anti-tTG, a celiac disease marker) and fetal growth and birth outcomes for pregnant women. The research team included J.C. Kiefte-de Jong, V.W. Jaddoe, A.G. Uitterlinden, E. A. Steegers, S.P. Willemsen, A. Hofman, H.Hooijkaas, and H.A. Moll of the Generation R Study Group at Erasmus University Medical Center in Rotterdam, The Netherlands. They conducted a population-based prospective birth cohort study of 7046 pregnant women. Serum samples were collected during the second trimester of pregnancy and analyzed for levels of anti-tTG. Based on these levels, they grouped each woman into groups of negative anti-tTG (≤0.79 U/mL; n = 6702), intermediate anti-tTG (0.8 to ≤6 U/mL; n = 308), or high anti-tTG individuals (over 6 U/mL; n = 36). They then collected data for fetal growth and birth outcomes from ultrasound measurements and medical records. The fetal growth data showed that, on average, fetuses of women in the positive anti-tTG group were 16 g lighter than those of women in the negative anti-tTG group (95% confidence interval [CI], -32 to -1 g) during the second trimester and weighed 74 g less (95% CI, -140 to -8 g) during the third trimester. The birth outcome data revealed that newborns of women in the intermediate and positive anti-tTG groups weighed 53 g (95% CI, -106 to -1 g) and 159 g (95% CI, -316 to -1 g) less at birth, respectively, than those of women in the negative anti-tTG group. Of mothers in the intermediate anti-tTG group, those with HLA-DQ2 or -DQ8 had reduced birth weights that were double those of mothers without HLA-DQ2 or -DQ8. This study led the researchers to conclude that levels of anti-tTG in pregnant women are inversely associated with fetal growth. The higher the anti-tTG in women, the lower the birth weights of their babies. So, women with the highest levels of anti-tTG (over 6 U/mL) saw the greatest reduction in birth weight of their babies. Also, women with intermediate levels of anti-tTG (0.8 to ≤6 U/mL) saw lower birth weights that were even further reduced if they carried the HLA-DQ2 and -DQ8 gene markers. Source: Gastroenterology. 2013 Apr;144(4):726-735.e2. doi: 10.1053/j.gastro.2013.01.003.
  18. Hi all. this is my first post on the forum. well i heard that women are 9x more likely to get dx than men. Is this true? if yes do we know why? I think it might just be that women are more likely to see a doctor, more likely to have insurance, and to admit certain symptoms, etc. thoughts?
  19. Celiac.com 10/07/2011 - A number of studies suggest that women with celiac disease have reproductive difficulties, but data have been inconclusive and contradictory. A research team recently set out to assess fertility in women with biopsy-verified celiac disease. The study team included Daniela Zugna, Lorenzo Richiardi, Olof Akre, Olof Stephansson, and Jonas F Ludvigsson. They are affiliated variously with the Cancer Epidemiology Unit at the Centre for Experimental Research and Medical Studies and Centre for Oncologic Prevention at the University of Turin in Turin, Italy, the Department of Paediatrics at Örebro University Hospital in Örebro, Sweden, and with Clinical Epidemiology Unit of the Department of Medicine, the Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, the Division of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, and the Department of Women's and Children's Health at the Karolinska Institutet in Karolinska, Sweden. For their Swedish population-based cohort study, the team gathered data all 28 pathology departments in Sweden on 18,005 biopsy-proven duodenal/jejunal biopsy, using Marsh III, villous atrophy as their baseline. They also established a control group of 51,109 age-matched women without celiac disease. They then found 11,495 women with celiac disease who were aged 18–45 years. The team used multinomial logistic regression and Cox regression to estimate fertility in these women compared with the age-matched reference women. The team defined 'fertility' as the number of children according to the Swedish Multi-Generation Register. Their results showed that women with celiac disease had 16,309 births compared with 69,245 for the reference group. Overall, the total number of children in the group of women with celiac disease was slightly higher compared with the reference group. Adjusting for age, calendar period and parity and stratifying by education, the overall fertility hazard ratio (HR) for women with celiac disease was 1.03 (95% CI 1.01 to 1.05). Specifically, the fertility HR was 1.05 (95% CI 0.96 to 1.14) for celiac disease diagnosed in women under 18-years of age, 1.04 (95% CI 1.01 to 1.07) for celiac disease diagnosed in women between 18 and 45 years, and 1.02 (95% CI 0.99 to 1.04) for celiac disease diagnosed in women >45 years of age. Factoring in the dates of celiac disease diagnosis, fertility was decreased 0–2 years before time of diagnosis (HR=0.63; 95% CI 0.57 to 0.70), but was identical to that of controls 0–5 years subsequent to diagnosis and increased to 1.12 (95% CI 1.03 to 1.21) thereafter. The data for this study show that women with celiac disease had a normal fertility, but their fertility was decreased in the last two years before diagnosis. Interestingly, fertility in women with celiac disease was also slightly higher after five years, comported to the control group. Stay tuned... Source: Gut 2010;59:1471-1475. doi:10.1136/gut.2010.219030
  20. Celiac.com 09/30/2011 - A new study indicates that women who suffer unexplained infertility suffer higher rates of undiagnosed celiac disease than those who do not experience unexplained infertility. The study appeared in the May-June issue of the Journal of Reproductive Medicine. Using serologic screening for celiac disease as well as routine infertility testing, Janet M. Choi, M.D., of Columbia University in New York City, led a study team that included B. Lebwohl, J. Wang, S. K. Lee, J. A. Murray, M. V. Sauer and P. H. R. Green. Together, they assessed 191 women with infertility. The researchers confirmed four women with positive serum test results to have celiac disease. That's 2.1 percent of the 188 patients who completed testing. The women received nutritional counseling to adopt a gluten-free diet. Now, this prevalence rate was not significantly higher than the expected 1.3 percent seen in the general population. However, three cases of undiagnosed celiac disease were seen among the 51 women with unexplained fertility, for a significantly higher prevalence rate of 5.9 percent. Interestingly, all four women found to have celiac disease successfully conceived within a year of diagnosis and treatment. From these results, the team concludes that women with unexplained infertility face a higher risk of undiagnosed celiac disease. They also suggest that this is a risk factor that can be mitigated, and treated. Source: The Journal of Reproductive Medicine
  21. Celiac.com 06/20/2011 - A team of researchers set out to assess menopause-associated disorders and fertile life span in women with untreated celiac disease compared to those who followed a long-term gluten-free diet. The research team included Antonella Santonicola, MD, Paola Iovino, MD, Carmelina Cappello, MD, Pietro Capone, MD, Paolo Andreozzi, MD, and Carolina Ciacci, MD. For their study, the team recruited 33 post-menopausal women with untreated celiac disease, 25 celiac women who had followed a gluten-free diet for at least ten years before menopause, and 45 healthy volunteers as a control group. The team used the Menopause Rating Scale questionnaire to gather information on menopause-associated disorders among study participants. They also used the International Physical Activity Questionnaire to chart information on physical activity. Overall, results showed that the women with untreated celiac disease had a shorter overall fertile life spans than did the control women. This was due to both a higher age of menarche and a lower age of menopause (P G 0.01). Women with untreated celiac disease also showed higher scores for hot flushes, muscle/joint problems, and irritability than the control group. An increase of 49.4%, 121.4%, and 58.6%, respectively; P G 0.05). In contrast with the untreated celiac women, those who followed a long-term gluten-free diet showed no significant difference in the duration of fertile life span. They also had about half as many muscle/joint problems than the untreated group, with a total reduction of 47.1%; P G 0.05. The data show that women with untreated celiac disease have later menarche and earlier menopause, which shortens their fertility periods compared to healthy women without celiac disease. Also, they perceive hot flushes and irritability much more intensely than control subjects. Women with celiac disease can prolong their fertility life span at least ten years prior to starting menopause. Lastly, untreated celiac disease may increase women's overall discomfort levels, and thus contribute to low physical exercise and/or poorer quality of life frequently reported by untreated celiac women. Source: The North American Menopause Society DOI: 10.1097/gme.0b013e3182188421
  22. Celiac.com 09/10/2010 - Women who regularly drink beer may face higher risk of developing psoriasis, an autoimmune disorder that causes skin rashes and other, according to a new study, though beverages, such as light beer and wine, showed no such elevated risk. For the study, a team of researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, and Boston University enrolled 82,869 women who were not originally diagnosed with psoriasis. They monitored the women for nearly fifteen years, from 1991 through 2005. During the study period, subjects used the women Nurses' Health Study II to report their regular alcohol consumption, and any diagnosis of psoriasis. The results showed that even relatively small amounts of beer corresponded to an increase psoriasis diagnosis. Women who drank just 2.3 beers a week saw their psoriasis rates rise by almost 80%. For women who drink five regular beers a week, the risk of developing psoriasis is nearly double that of non-drinkers. Does this mean women shouldn't drink beer? Not exactly. "We can say that if a woman would like to consume alcohol and if she has a family history of psoriasis or known psoriasis in the past or some other reason she might be predisposed to psoriasis, the alcohol of choice probably should not be nonlight beer," said Dr. Abrar A. Qureshi, lead author of an article on the study published in Archives of Dermatology. But Bruce Bebo, director of research and medical programs at the National Psoriasis Foundation, says the findings warrant "more investigation to determine whether there's a real connection or not." Earlier studies have also tied psoriasis rates to alcohol consumption, although the nature of this connection is not well understood. The fact that no other types of alcohol in this study showed the same association with psoriasis was of particular interest to Bebo. "There is evidence that alcohol consumption can affect immune responses and psoriasis is an autoimmune disease," Bebo said. "There's also some evidence that it can affect the biology of keratinocytes (certain skin cells). But ... then why would it be nonlight beer, why not wine or other alcohol? Maybe there's something in wine that ... might reverse the effect." Another study in the same issue of journal reports that people with psoriasis suffer higher rates of depression, anxiety and even suicidal thoughts. That study, by researchers from the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, found that men with psoriasis suffered from these adverse mental health outcomes more than women. Source: U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health
  23. International Osteoporosis Foundation and National Osteoporosis Foundation 2005 - Received: 31 March 2004 / Accepted: 30 November, 2004 / Published online: 4 February 2005. Michael W. Davie, I. Gaywood, E. George, P.W. Jones, T. Masud, T. Price, G.D. Summers. International Osteoporosis Foundation and National Osteoporosis Foundation 2005 - Received: 31 March 2004 / Accepted: 30 November, 2004 / Published online: 4 February 2005. Celiac.com 04/27/2006 - Because recent studies may have underestimated the association of celiac disease with fracture by studying patients with low fracture risk, doctors recently conducted a more comprehensive survey of celiac and non-celiac patients. Their study of post-menopausal women over age 50 concluded that women diagnosed with celiac disease face an increased risk of fracture over time compared with control groups. The study looked at non-spinal fracture risk associated with celiac patients and non-celiac control groups in relation to the time-periods before and after the diagnosis of celiac disease. According to the study, Celiac patients displayed greater fracture prevalence (odds ratio [OR], 1.51), confidence interval [CI], 1.13:2.02) and fracture after 50 years (OR, 2.20; CI, 1.49:3.25). The study compared Three hundred and eighty-three female celiac patients with 445 female controls, all over 50 years old. The mean age of celiacs tested was 61.4-67.8 years, and 62.7-69.9 years in controls. The celiac patients generally weighed less than the control patients of the same height. Among celiac patients diagnosed after age 50, no excess fracture risk was found in the period more than 10 years before diagnosis, but risk increased in the period from 10 years before diagnosis to 5 years after and remained high more than 5 years after diagnosis (p Adjusted for height and weight, instance of wrist fracture between the groups was about the same, but celiacs did have more multiple fractures (OR, 2.96; CI, 1.81:4.83). Further, while women diagnosed before age fifty, showed no excess fracture risk, those celiac patients more than five years beyond their diagnosis faced increased risk of wrist fractures ( p While women diagnosed with celiac disease before age 50 faced no greater risk than their non-celiac peers, for those diagnosed after age fifty, the risk of fracture increases as the years pass, with the greatest statistical increase occurring five to ten years after a diagnosis. Accordingly, thin women over 50 who suffer from multiple fractures should consider being tested for celiac disease. If the diagnosis is positive, they should take measures to ensure proper calcium and vitamin D intake.
  24. Gastroenterology, 2005; 128: 849-855 Celiac.com 04/29/2005 – In contrast to previous studies, the findings of a study by researchers in the United Kingdom indicate that women with celiac disease do not have an increased risk of infertility. Their study compared computerized primary care data on 1,521 women with celiac disease, and, unlike past studies, compared that data with 7,732 age and practice-matched women without celiac disease. They found that fertility rates were 48.2 live births per 1,000 person-years for women without celiac disease, while those with the disease had 47.7 live births. Interestingly the researchers found that women with celiac disease had lower fertility rates when they were younger, and higher rates when they were older, compared to the non-celiac group, and the increase in fertility seen in older women with the disease was not affected by whether they were on a gluten-containing vs. gluten-free diet. The researchers noted a slightly higher risk of miscarriage and delivery by cesarean section in the group of women with celiac disease, while all other negative outcomes occurred at a level similar to that of the healthy control group. The researchers conclude that women with celiac disease have similar fertility rates to that of the normal female population, and they tend to have their babies at an older age.
  25. Celiac.com 09/29/2003 - The results of a study published in the September edition of American Journal of Gastroenterology indicate that women with treated celiac disease suffer twice as many gastrointestinal symptoms than do their male counterparts, and that men with treated celiac disease suffered no more GI symptoms than did the normal population. More studies need to be done, however, to determine why male celiacs seem to respond better to treatment than females. Some follow-up work has already been done on this topic. -Scott Here is the abstract: Am J Gastroenterol. 2003 Sep;98(9):2023-6. High rate of gastrointestinal symptoms in celiac patients living on a gluten-free diet: controlled study. Midhagen G, Hallert C. Department of Internal Medicine, Skovde Hospital, Skovde, Sweden The aim of this study was to determine the occurrence of GI symptoms in adults with celiac disease (celiac disease) treated with a gluten-free diet for several years. We studied a cohort of adults with celiac disease (n = 51; 59% women) aged 45-64 yr and proved to be in remission after 8-12 yr of treatment. They were examined by the GI Symptom Rating Scale, which comprises five syndromes: indigestion, diarrhea, constipation, abdominal pain, and reflux. A general population sample (n = 182; 57% women) of same age served as controls. Subjects with celiac disease reported significantly more GI symptoms than the general population sample, as assessed by the GI Symptom Rating Scale total score (p
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