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Found 11 results

  1. Celiac.com 07/19/2017 - Ever wondered what life is like in the celiac disease capital of the world? In Finland, an estimated 2.4 percent of adults from 30 to 64 years old, and one in 99 children are diagnosed with celiac disease. The country also holds the record for the most overall cases of the celiac disease in the world. If ever there was a world headquarters for celiac disease, it would be Finland. One of the best things about Finland is that awareness of keliaka (celiac disease) is common, and gluten-free food is readily available. Throughout the country, most folks you run into know some friend, colleague or family member with the condition. Everyone seems to be aware that celiac disease results from an adverse gut reaction gluten, a protein in wheat, barley and rye products. Meanwhile, supermarkets, high-end restaurants, convenience stores, fast-food joints, gas stations, and even international fast food chains like McDonald’s offer gluten-free options. As a nation, Finland places a heavy emphasis on research, diagnostics or government support for celiac disease. The nation embraces people who follow what the Finns call gluteeniton, or a ‘gluten-free’ diet. So if you’re looking for the closest thing to a gluten-free paradise on earth, consider a visit to Finland. Read more at AllergicLiving.com
  2. Celiac.com 04/29/2016 - Efforts to develop gluten-free version of traditional grains like wheat have been underway for some time, with limited success. Now, scientists in Australia say they've developed the world's first World Health Organization-approved "gluten-free" barley. Since barley is a key ingredient in traditional beers, you might imagine that the beer viewing world would be keenly interested in such a development, and you would be right. Developed by the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO), the product, called Kebari barley, has already drawn interest from a number of commercial breweries. One German brewery, Radeberger, has already ordered 70 tons of the product. Kebari is not genetically modified. Instead, it is the end product of "cross-breeding low gluten barley varieties," CSIRO told Reuters. While Kebari is not 100 percent gluten-free, it is bred to contain "10,000 times less gluten than traditional strains, or about 5 parts of gluten per million, well below the World Health Organization's (WHO) 20 parts per million for classification as a gluten-free grain," according to Reuters. With gluten-free foods and beverages being of the world's fastest growing consumer trends, gluten-free barley could prove to be a very popular ingredient for making celiac-safe beers in the traditional European style. "A true gluten-free barley variety is a true game changer; there is going to be a massive market for the product," Phin Ziebell, an agribusiness economist at National Australia Bank, told Reuters.
  3. The new gluten-free cookbook "A World of Flavor" is clearly a labor of love for its authors, Amber Barrett and Nancy Miller. Amber is also a gifted photographer, and the photographs in this book could be the best of any cookbook I've ever seen. On top of this, the book includes some amazing recipes that everyone will like, including: Hot Wings, Bacon and Cheddar Scones, Donuts, Sandwich Bread, Rocky Road Brownies, Crepes, General Tso's Chicken, Croutons, and many more (I counted 77). From breakfasts, appetizers, desserts, main dishes and snacks, to salads, vegetables, and side dishes, this outstanding gluten-free cookbook has much to offer anyone who is on a gluten-free diet. For more info visit: www.thewhiskandthespoon.com/cookbook
  4. Celiac.com 07/17/2014 - Italian researchers are claiming a major scientific and potentially commercial breakthrough that could lead to a revolution in the food available to people with celiac disease. The researchers, all at the Department of Agricultural Sciences, Food and the Environment, University of Foggia are claiming that their revolutionary new method will enable the manufacture of wheat products safe for people with celiac disease. The method method involves modifying the gluten proteins in standard wheat so that it will not trigger an adverse gluten reaction in people with celiac disease. They claim that their method enables the production of celiac safe and gluten-friendly foods containing “all the dough and baked products made with flour from commonly obtained wheat.” A patent has been made by Prof. Aldo Di Luccia and Prof. Carmen Lamacchia, and CNR researcher Dr. Carmela Gianfrani. The application was filed in Italy with the Italian Patent and Trademark Office at the Ministry of Economic Development, on 2 October 2012. An application for extension according to the International Patent Cooperation Treaty (PCT) was filed on 29 April 2013. Both researchers have earned a very positive evaluation by the award of the higher threshold of the so-called "scientific credibility". Specifically, they claim that their method induces changes in gluten proteins, which break the chain of chemical combinations that trigger the so-called "intolerance" changes, thus avoiding the inflammatory process that interferes with nutrient absorption, and causes lesions and bowel dysfunction. Source: University of Foggia
  5. Celiac.com 11/01/2010 - American Key Food Products (AKFP) has announced a patent application for the production process for a gluten-free cassava flour. The company also announced that it has begun initial production of this new gluten-free flour at its manufacturing facility in Brazil. Gluten is the protein found in wheat, rye, and barley. Gluten provides the structural elasticity in kneaded dough products, permits leavening, and supports the crumb structure and chewy texture of traditional baked goods. In the last few years, a number of manufacturers have produced gluten-free flour and starch products for gluten-free baking. However, creating baked goods without gluten is challenging, and the resulting baked goods can often be dry, crumbly, or gummy products. Cassava, or tapioca flour, has been one of the more promising ingredients for gluten-free baking. However, most traditional cassava flours have a coarse texture, similar to corn meal. According to AKFP technical sales director Carter Foss, the company has spent more than a year developing the flour to have baking characteristics that closely mimic wheat flour in structure, texture and taste. The result of the AKFP process, which uses the complete root, is a fine, soft flour that contains both protein and fiber. The patent application covers various aspects of the manufacturing process, including particular milling and drying procedures, as well as the resulting flour itself. “During the processing of it, we have to get the physical characteristics made correctly or the flour fails. It over-bakes and turns to dust,” Foss said. Foss says that AKFP cassava flour can replace combinations of flours, starches and hydrocolloids in gluten-free baked goods, allowing for a simpler ingredient statement. After the pilot runs are completed at its new Brazilian facility, AKFP intends to have continuous production on line by the beginning of 2011. Source: http://www.foodnavigator-usa.com/Financial-Industry/AKFP-applies-for-patent-for-gluten-free-cassava-flour
  6. Celiac.com 09/25/2014 - Nine out of ten wheat crops around the globe are susceptible to a killer fungus that attacks wheat. The pathogen is Puccinia rust fungus. Puccinia triticina causes 'black rust', P.recondita causes 'brown rust' and P.striiformis causes 'Yellow rust'. Originally named Ug99, but now known as wheat stem rust, the fungus affects wheat, barley and rye stems, leaves and grains, and causes plants to rot and die just a few weeks after infection. Infections can lead up to 20% yield loss exacerbated by dying leaves which fertilize the fungus. The fungus regularly causes serious epidemics in North America, Mexico and South America and is a devastating seasonal disease in India, and a widespread outbreak could destroy flour supplies as we know them. Previous solutions to the problem of wheat stem rust relied on simple crossbreeding. Beginning in the 1940s, breeders began combining rust-sensitive commercial wheat with hardier rust-resistant strains. However, those solutions were only temporary at best, as the rust always managed to find a way around rust-resistant genes after just three or four years. Scientists now use what they say is a more effective method of thwarting rust, wheat breeding, called “pyramiding,” in which multiple rust resistant genes are loaded onto a single wheat strain, potentially keeping rust at bay for decades to come, but pyramiding takes up to 15 years to produce a rust-resistant wheat strain. This means that the vast majority of wheat strains under cultivation could be subject to rust in the mean time. Obviously, not all of the wheat strains susceptible to rust will be affected in any given year, but major outbreaks can and do happen. The possibility that large percentages of the world’s wheat crops could be destroyed by rust are very real, hence the intensity of the efforts to develop rust-resistant strains as quickly as possible. However, if these efforts fail, or lose traction, look for non-wheat crops to fill the gap. That will mean large numbers of people going gluten-free for reasons having nothing to do with celiac disease or dietary fads.
  7. Celiac.com 05/22/2013 - Tragedy has struck the celiac community when an established author's life was taken while crossing a street in Calgary, Canada. She was a popular published author by the name of Wendy Turnball. She was made famous by her first book, Canadian Bestseller "Gems of Gluten-Free Baking." Wendy was diagnosed with celiac as an infant and was immediately put on a gluten-free diet. Physicians told her parents it was a childhood disease which she would outgrow. In her thirties infection reactivated her celiac symptoms. Wendy was passionate about baking gluten-free foods that could stand up to regular foods. She developed her very own whole-grain flours, which she called GEMS flour. She's left behind a gluten-free baking staple for celiacs everywhere to enjoy. Source: http://blogs.edmontonjournal.com/2013/04/30/best-selling-calgary-author-of-gluten-free-cookbook-dies-in-car-accident/
  8. Celiac.com 07/31/2012 - Dana Vollmer could be walking (or swimming) proof of the benefits a gluten-free diet can afford athletes. In the second day of London's 2012 Olympics, Vollmer, who suffers from gluten sensitivity and an egg allergy, took the gold medal in the Women's 100-meter butterfly final, breaking her own personal record, as well as the world record. What is interesting about Vollmer and her success is that she seems to have reached her athletic peak while on a gluten-free diet. In the days before her diagnosis, she did what many Olympic athletes do before competitions: load up on carbohydrates. With pasta and eggs out of the equation, that becomes harder to accomplish, so some might think that she would be at a disadvantage. Evidently, she is not missing the pasta or the eggs though. On Sunday, she managed to break the 6-minute mark, clocking in at 55.98 seconds to break the world record and set a milestone for athletes and celiacs everywhere. So what does Vollmer fuel her gold-winning machinery with? According to her Twitter feed, the hard-earned gold was won on rice, almonds, sunflower seeds, crushed peanuts, peanut butter, milk and bananas. In an interview with KidsHealth, she said she also eats a great deal of quinoa, lean meat, vegetables and brown rice. It may not be the carb-heavy diet that Olympic athletes have been trained on, but clearly Vollmer is getting the nutrition and protein she needs to take home medals. With this precedent set, perhaps more Olympic athletes will start adopting the gluten-free diet. Sources: http://www.nbcsandiego.com/news/health/Gluten-Free-Dana-Vollmer-164310186.html http://twitter.com/danavollmer http://kidshealth.org/kid/health_problems/allergiesimmune/vollmer.html
  9. Celiac.com 06/27/2011 - In order to protect the propriety of their products, distilleries can be reluctant to disclose process details. Yet their disclosure is crucial for those of us who are unable to consume gluten. Recently, I investigated a potato vodka and gin distillery in Freeport, Maine where this is not the case. Don Thibodeau, president of Green Thumb Farms, launched Maine Distilleries in 2004 with his brother, Lee Thibodeau, and managing partners, Bob Harkins, director of sales and marketing, and Chris Dowe, head distiller. Maine Distilleries is dedicated to the production of three spirits that are sold under its Cold River label. Green Thumb Farms, a 2,000-acre family-owned farm located in Fryeburg, Maine, produces potatoes, beans, and corn in the alluvial soils of the Cold River. I started my visit there with Don. The farm’s clients include Frito-Lay and super market chains Whole Foods Market and Shaws. For as long as they can remember, Don and Lee had discussed vodka production as a potential use for the farm’s off-grade, cull potatoes which are too small, too big or too blemished to sell. “If the potatoes are not beautiful,” explained Don, “they don’t go into the bag.” Nowadays, customers also look for clean potatoes. In years past, potatoes were bagged dirty, because they stay fresher that way. The cleaning and sorting of potatoes is a complex process involving several pieces of equipment including one called an “Odenburg.” An Odenburg is an automatic grader with beams of light, or electronic eyes, that sense variations in color - and sorts potatoes accordingly. Yes, customers are even selective about color. As production increases at the distillery, Maine Distilleries will look beyond Green Thumb Farms for cull potatoes, which is really good news for the potato farmers of Maine. According to the Maine Department of Agriculture, Food and Rural Resources, Maine ranks eighth in the country in the production of potatoes. At Maine Distilleries, a small, copper pot “still” stood out from the rest of the equipment. It belonged to Don’s and Lee’s late father, Larry, a third-generation Presque Island area potato farmer. Don and Lee grew up listening to stories their father told of making potato vodka during the prohibition period. Many of the local potato farmers in years past had stills just like this one. Larry’s old copper pot was small enough to fit in the back seat of my car. As I began my tour, I couldn’t help but wonder what Larry might think of Maine Distilleries’ very large, copper pot still. The still’s enrichment column is two stories high. Assistant distiller, Ben Francis, gave me a tour of the facility and its five processes, which are mashing, fermentation, distillation, blending and bottling. We began at the mashing kettle. Potatoes are conveyed (on a belt) to the mashing kettle from a nearby storage area. Mashing breaks the potatoes’ starches down into sugars, which takes approximately 12 hours. The resulting mash, also called “potato soup,” is discharged through piping to fermentation kettles. Yeast is added to the potato soup in the fermentation kettles, and consumes the sugar, producing ethanol. Fermentation takes one to two days, according to Chris Dowe, the head distiller, and the yeast is kosher and naturally gluten free. The resulting “potato wine” is about 9 percent ethanol. Water and solids make up the remaining volume. The potato wine is discharged through piping from the fermentation kettles into holding tanks in the distillation room. Each batch is distilled three times in the copper bottom still in order to separate the ethanol from the water and the solids. After the first distillation, the ethanol is approximately 50 percent; after the second distillation, 95 percent; and after the third distillation, 96 percent. Boiling point is crucial to the success of distillation. The enrichment column extending from the copper pot still is kept cooler at the base in order to prohibit the water and the solids from vaporizing and traveling up along the column with the ethanol, which has a much lower boiling point. Most large commercial distilleries use continuous, stainless steel stills. But distilled spirits experts claim that hand-crafted spirits that are produced in small batches in copper stills are superior to continuous, stainless steel methods. Maine Distilleries’ copper pot still was itself hand-crafted in Stuttgart, Germany. Stuttgart is known for its custom copper fabricators as well as this particular copper pot still design. After the third distillation, the resulting ethanol is blended with deionized spring water to produce Cold River’s vodka. The spring water originates from the Cold River/Saco Valley aquifer at Green Thumb Farms. Some manufacturers add compounds (such as glycerol) to improve the smoothness or taste of a vodka; such is not the case here. Maine Distilleries has been selling Cold River’s classic vodka since 2005. In 2009, Maine Distilleries launched its second product, Cold River’s blueberry-flavored vodka. It was a logical choice, explained Ben, because Maine is the world’s largest producer of blueberries. Maine Distilleries uses low-bush, wild blueberries from Jasper Wyman & Son, of Milbridge, Maine, a family-owned enterprise that is known as the leading U.S. grower, packer, and marketer of wild blueberries. To make blueberry-flavored vodka, Maine Distilleries infuses macerated blueberries in its classic vodka. After several days of infusing, the ethanol is drawn off and blended with the deionized spring water and a small amount of cane sugar. No artificial flavors or aromas are added to this product. In August 2010, Maine Distilleries launched its third product, Cold River’s gin. Botanicals are added to the classic vodka to make the gin. The botanical blend, which dates back to the early days of British gin, contains juniper berries, coriander, lemon peel, orange peel, orris root, angelica root, and cardamom. After the botanicals are added to the classic vodka, it is distilled for a fourth time and then blended with the deionized spring water to produce Cold River’s gin. Alcohol beverage labeling is regulated by the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau of the U.S. Treasury. Under the Bureau’s current labeling regulations, Maine Distilleries is not permitted to print “gluten-free product” on its bottles. Since the passage of the U.S. Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act in 2004, the Bureau has promised to finalize and implement labeling regulations that would require allergen statements on all bottles. Three million people with celiac disease and another 18 million with gluten sensitivity have been eagerly awaiting the final approval of these long overdue regulations. Cold River’s classic vodka has acquired an impressive number of awards for such a new product. In September 2007, it earned a Five-Star Premium Recommendation from Spirits Journal. In 2008, it was named to Wine Enthusiast’s prestigious list of “Top 50 Spirits,” and earned the magazine’s sole “Classic (96-100) / Highest Recommendation” rating for 2008. It went on to earn Double Gold at San Francisco’s 2008 World Spirits Competition, and was featured as “The Best American Vodka” in spirits expert F. Paul Pacult’s Kindred Spirits 2. Are Cold River’s vodkas and gin gluten free? Until the new regulations are finalized, it’s tough to say. Meanwhile, disclosure at Maine Distilleries is as clear as the Cold River. FOR MORE INFORMATION: Green Thumb Farms http://greenthumbfarms.com Maine Distilleries http://www.mainedistilleries.com Gluten Free Dietician - Labeling of Alcohol http://www.glutenfreedietitian.com/newsletter/2011/01/18/gluten-free-labeling-of-alcohol/ Note: Alcohol beverage labeling for gluten free beer; or, wine and cider containing less than 7 percent alcohol (by volume), is regulated by the Food & Drug Administration.
  10. Celiac.com 10/07/2011 - In October 2010, Kicking 4 Celiac Foundation Executive Director Craig Pinto made 717 regulation field goals in a 12 hour period to set a Guinness World Record. That success marked the beginning of the foundation's annual “Kicking4Celiac” event, which raises money and awareness for celiac disease. The second annual “Kicking4Celiac” event is set for October 9th, when Pinto will return to the football field at Bethpage High School and attempt a second world record, this one for the “Most Field Goals made in 24 Hours.” Pinto must make a at least 1,000 field goals in 24 hours to break the existing world record. This year’s event will help to grow the foundation's scholarship program, which, beginning in early 2012, will award scholarships to college-bound students with celiac disease. Speaking of last year's event, Pinto said that "the progression mirrored what I went through with celiac disease. The initial mental stress, the physical stress, but the hard work to make it through, and come out on top. It is something I want to continue to do, to break people’s thoughts and stigmas that when you’re diagnosed with celiac disease that your physical abilities will change." Pinto added that the “support from people reaching out was absolutely amazing, and it just showed how strong the celiac community stands behind and supports each other. We’re in this together.”
  11. Celiac.com 12/06/2005 - Alek Komarnitsky from Lafayette, CO (USA) has had thousands of Christmas lights on his house for the enjoyment of friends and neighbors since 2000. In 2002, he added a webcam and webcontrol, so people on the Internet could not only view his lights, but turn them on & off and see the results on their computer screen via the Christmas webcam. It got increasingly popular each year, and in 2004, a media frenzy erupted over it and the story went around the world on the Internet, in print, on radio, and on TV - one of the more entertaining segments was when Denver ABC-7 took him up in their helicopter for a live report on the 6:00 News of the blinking lights. There was only one problem - it was all a fun little Christmas hoax. The lights were real, but a sequence of still images were used to provide the illusion that people were changing them. Aleks wife was changing the lights when the chopper was overhead, but the rest of the time they never changed! Concerned that his prank had gotten out of hand, Alek approached the Wall Street Journal to fess up and High Tech Holiday Light Display Draws Everyone But the Skeptics revealed the hoax after Christmas. Needless to say, the media howled over this change of events, and another round of international publicity ensued as people around the world got a good post-holiday chuckle. For 2005, Alek suggests a headline of High Tech Holiday Display Says Bring on the Skeptics! With improved technology available, he has three (real) ChristmasCams (three more than last year!) providing real-time views of his 26,000 Christmas Lights. And using X10 power line control technology, people on the Internet really can them on and off this year. He adds Ill be sure to have it operational on Christmas Eve so web surfers can look for Santa, but realistically, I doubt well get a picture of Rudolph landing on my roof .... but HEY, you never know! Aleks children - Dirk and Kyle While www.komar.org has always been free to Internet surfers around the world, Alek encourages those people who enjoy the Christmas lights show to consider making a direct contribution to the CFCR. Aleks two sons have celiac disease, so this cause is important to him. Individuals and companies that donate are listed on the high traffic web site for Christmas lights fans around the world to see. And in keeping with Aleks whimsical nature, he has donated the Christmas Lights Webcam that Fooled the World to the CFCR. There actually was a webcam last year, since as the media showed up at his house in droves, he figured he should put something up in the tree across the street to make it look like there was one. So he a cobbled together a contraption of a Christmas slide projector ($10), a half a roll of duct tape ($2), and ended up fooling the world - PRICELESS! The CFCR plans to have an eBay auction in December of this well constructed piece of history - again, 100% of proceeds for Celiac Research. So for those that missed out on the $28,000 Virgin Mary French Toast, get ready for the eBay auction of the The Christmas Lights Webcam that Fooled the World. Make a donation at the University of Marylands Center for Celiac Disease Research And be sure to say For Christmas Lights when make your donation.
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