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Found 3 results

  1. Celiac.com 04/01/2014 - Want to turn a few new corners with lamb? This recipe for perfectly cooked lamb loin chops and a yummy mint chimichurri sauce will do the trick. This recipe works best with lamb loin chops or thick rib chops. Ingredients: 2 pounds of lamb loin chops, about 8 chops, 1½ inch thick 2 tablespoons of red wine vinegar 1 teaspoon Kosher salt ½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 2 tablespoons olive oil ½ cup baking soda Chimichurri Sauce: 4 cloves garlic, chopped 1½ cups fresh mint leaves, stemmed and packed 1 cups fresh parsley leaves, packed ½ cup stemmed fresh cilantro 2½ tablespoons fresh lemon juice 2½ tablespoons red wine vinegar 1 teaspoon Kosher salt ¼ teaspoon red pepper flakes ¼ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper ½ cup olive oil Directions: Coat chops with baking soda and place in refrigerator for 20 minutes. Remove chops from the refrigerator, rinse well and pat dry. Coat chops with red wine vinegar and let sit for 20-30 minutes. Pat chops dry with paper towel and sprinkle on all sides with Kosher salt. Set aside and prepare the chimichurri sauce. Finely chop the garlic, mint and parsley, and put into a bowl. Stir in the wine vinegar, salt, and red pepper flakes. Stir in the olive oil. Heat olive oil in a large cast iron pan on medium high heat. Sprinkle black pepper on both sides of the chops. When the pan is hot, place the chops meat-side down in the pan. Leave space between the chops, do not crowd the pan. Do not move the chops, just let them brown, about 2 to 4 minutes on each side, depending on the heat of your pan and the size of the chops. Once browned on one side, turn them over and brown the other side. Then quickly sear the fatty back edge of the chops. Once the chops are completely browned, lower the heat and continue to cook until the lamb chops are done to your liking. Lamb is best served rare, that means vivid pink on the inside, and never more cooked than medium rare. That means removing the meat from the pan at 120° to 125°F for rare, and 130° to 135°F for medium rare. Some chops may cook faster than others, so check them as they cook, and pull them off the pan as they reach desired doneness. Place the chops on a plate and cover with foil. Let rest for 10 minutes before serving. Serve with chimichurri sauce.
  2. In the celiac world, there remains a long-standing controversy over whether to exclude oats and oat products from the list of "safe" gluten-free grains. When I was diagnosed with celiac disease, standard protocol recommended against including oats in a gluten-free diet, but more recent studies show that oats themselves are likely not the source of a celiac reaction. Instead, researchers now believe that the fact that milled oats are often contaminated with other gluten-containing grains has skewed diagnostic testing of reactions to gluten from oat products. The most recent scientific statements on the inclusion of a reasonable amount of oats (1 cup or less per day) in a gluten-free diet indicate that most individuals with celiac disease can actually tolerate uncontaminated oats. However, health professionals (including the American Dietetic Association) recommend that newly diagnosed celiac patients avoid oats until the disease is well-controlled with full resolution of symptoms and normal blood tests demonstrate that tissue transglutaminase levels (IgA tTG) are under control. Gastroenterologists also universally caution that introducing oats into your diet should only be done under the guidance of your physician. Federal food labeling laws and rules have incorporated this recent research and have not per se excluded oats from future "gluten-free" labeling, so long as the manufacturer seeking to dub its oat containing product "gluten-free" demonstrates that there is less than 20 parts per million (ppm) of gluten in that product, just as in any other. Thus, it seems the greatest hurdle to reintroducing oats to your gluten-free diet will be the shortage of mills and processing plants which produce certified "gluten-free" oats (and the resulting high cost of those few products)! I decided to try these outrageously expensive "gluten-free" oats myself to expand my baking horizons (of course, I discussed this with my physician first...). I doubt I will be sitting down to a big bowl of oatmeal anytime soon, since I still love my grits and they are probably 1/5 the price of gluten-free oats! However, as it would be challenging to make oatmeal-like cookies with grits, I dove into my $12 box of oats to see what happened. (Granted, as time goes by, companies like Bob's Red Mill are thankfully making gluten-free oats more prolific -- and thus, less expensive -- they will always be more expensive than my grits!) Just as an aside, I recently found a product available (finally) in the United States that would probably make a mean oatmeal cookie for those of you who are unable or unwilling to give the gluten-free oats a try. On one of my European adventures many years ago I thoroughly enjoyed German muesli made with rice flakes, but have since been unsuccessful finding them Stateside. Imagine my surprise when, on a slightly less exciting adventure last week, I discovered them at David's Natural Market in Columbia, Maryland! But back to the oats. I used them quite successfully in the first oatmeal-raisin cookie I have had since 1999, and I'm pleased to share the recipe with any of you who would like to try! The oats I used were Lara's and the rice flake substitute I found at my local organic market was made by Shiloh Farms. The cookies are soft, moist, chewy, full of cinnamon-y flavor and are almost totally gone, so I only had 2 left for a picture! I probably should have doubled the recipe, but my oats were so darn expensive! Oh well, these are worth splurging for next time. I hope you enjoy! ~jules Soft & Chewy Oatmeal Raisin Cookies ½ cup Earth Balance Buttery Sticks or butter ½ cup granulated cane sugar ½ cup firmly packed brown sugar 1 egg + 1 egg white ½ teaspoon gluten-free vanilla extract 1 cup All Purpose Nearly Normal Gluten-Free Flour Mix ½ teaspoon baking soda 1 teaspoon baking powder ¼ teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon cinnamon 1 ½ cups gluten-free oats* ½ cup baking raisins** Cream the sugars and butter until fluffy. Add the eggs one at a time and thoroughly incorporate into the batter. Stir in the vanilla last. In a separate bowl, combine all dry ingredients (except oats), mixing well. Stir into the creamed mixture until integrated. Stir in the oats and raisins. Cover the bowl and chill until cold, at least 2 hours. Preheat oven to 350 F for static ovens or 325 F for convection. Roll the dough into tablespoon-sized balls and place at least 2 inches apart on a parchment-lined cookie sheet. Bake for 8 - 10 minutes, or until lightly brown. If you can wait, let them cool on a wire rack before removing. *Note: Not all people with celiac disease can include oats in their diets. For more information on whether they are appropriate for your diet please see our Celiac Disease and Oats section. **If you do not have baking raisins on hand, gently boil ½ cup of raisins in a saucepan with enough water to cover them. Drain, then add to your recipe.
  3. Celiac.com 04/15/2010 - Ten years ago, I embarked on a life that came with a warning about the Specific Carbohydrate Diet from my naturopathic practitioner, "it is a great diet, but a hard one." Those were fighting words to someone who has made a lifetime of "cosmetic" dieting with tendencies to yo yo back and forth into the obesity zone. The Specific Carbohydrate Diet diet was chosen to relieve pain. Starting a new weight-loss diet had always been inviting and exciting. The magic of the initial water weight-loss, the restrictive ruthless regimentation, calorie counting, portion control and forced water consumption were as exciting as hair shirts and beds of nails for religious fanatics. Dieting was my religion, food was like the duplicitous friend who is an enemy at the same time. The years marched on and my "stuff and starve" lifestyle beat a destructive highway to digestive hell in the form of celiac disease, an illness that could have been caused by any number of things, age, a compromised immune system, a recent illness or maybe even the evil eye. That was ten years ago. It has turned out that the Specific Carbohydrate Diet is no transient companion to my fork, knife and spoon. It blossomed into a creative and motivating experience, a learning opportunity, a template for sharing, writing and creating recipes and a sometimes tiresome topic at social gatherings (although as we age, health chat is pretty popular). I have made more friends through the Specific Carbohydrate Diet than at the dog park and have been given the opportunity to help strangers. Food at the good restaurants pales in comparison to the ever innovative pure, tasty, quality meals and dishes I create from the Specific Carbohydrate Diet palette of foods. Excluded are refined sugars, starches and gluten and they are not much missed. After eight years on the Specific Carbohydrate Diet, I tried occasional servings of rice and potatoes and some dark chocolate just to see if I had healed. Sometimes I tolerated these well, sometimes not and mainly lost interest. As for grain, it can remain on that plain in Spain. I want no part of it. The Specific Carbohydrate Diet has not cured me, and I doubt that it will, but it is an effective dietary management program. Yes I still get the bloat, the night time rashes, and the irritated bowel and sometimes I still have a very touchy immune system. It depends on the load at a given time. One thing that is really helpful then is a few days back on the initial introductory portion of the Specific Carbohydrate Diet. It calms the "Gut Devils" and clears the "Digestive Decks." If people deal the "pity card" as I describe being on a gastric diet, I ignore it as my diet deals aces and also the "Get Out of Pain Jail" card and of course, to this old dieter, the permanent thrill of the drill.
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