Jump to content
Celiac Disease FAQ | This site uses cookies GDPR notice. Read more... ×
  • Sign Up

Eli2003

Members
  • Content Count

    2
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

0 Neutral

About Eli2003

  • Rank
    Contributor
  1. I've been gluten-free for almost a year now and originally started the diet in a weird way. I live in South Korea as a teacher, and started seeing a traditional doctor because of my all-around poor health and fatigue. He recommended losing wheat from my diet, and I found it to be incredibly helpful. I know I eventually need to go to a proper doctor and get tested, but it's difficult to find one and know what I should be testing for. I feel a million times better now that I'm gluten-free, but it's really demanding to stay gluten-free while living in South Korea (finding food can be a pain, and reading labels in hangul takes forever, etc etc). I find that my boyfriend isn't very helpful, and sometimes I'm sure that he thinks I'm crazy- I feel incredibly high-maintenance because of the diet. How much support should I expect from him at this point? I could really use any advice as I feel a bit adrift out here in SK, with absolutely no friends with food allergies...
  2. I've been gluten-free in Korea for about a year now, and it's tough. Especially if you'll be out with family and friends, dining out is a big issue. The best thing I can recommend is to get a restaurant card that lists your food allergies in Korean, to show to the waitstaff. One thing I have found, if it's possible to make accomodations, Korean restaurant owners are really happy to help. Be really careful of red pepper paste- most of it has soy in it. And sadly, most Korean foods have red pepper paste in it. I think that kimchi chiggae (kimchi soup) is about your safest bet, or dubu kimchi (uncooked tofu and kimchi). Bibimbop is good without adding any red pepper paste, and some of the meats at galbi restaurants (Korean BBQ) don't have a marinade (the beef that's cut into smaller pieces is my best bet). There are also some great rice and sweet potato noodle dishes, but the sauces are always iffy. This is sort of a vague description, but if I can help more send me a message! I think Korea is about the hardest place to be gluten-free, but it's a lovely country!
×