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  1. Celiac Disease: Diagnosis, Recovery, Related Disorders & Research

    1. Gluten-Free and Celiac Disease Calendar of Events   (206,944 visits to this link)

      Enter your group's Gluten-Free and Celiac Disease events here.

    2. Celiac Disease - Pre-Diagnosis, Testing & Symptoms

      Discussions related to testing for celiac disease.

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      118,281
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    3. Celiac Disease - Post Diagnosis, Recovery/Treatment(s)

      Discussions related to one's diagnosis with celiac disease.

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      66,756
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    4. Celiac Disease - Related Disorders & Research

      Discussions concerning health problems associated with celiac disease, including refractory celiac disease and collagenous sprue.

      4,672
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      44,391
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    5. Dermatitis Herpetiformis

      Discussions concerning the skin condition associated with celiac disease.

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      14,680
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    6. Gluten Intolerance and Behavior

      Discussions concerning behavioral issues associated with the consumption of gluten.

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      3,610
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  2. Celiac Disease Support & Help

    1. Celiac Disease - Coping With

      This part of the forum is for techniques and information on how to cope with celiac disease and the gluten-free diet

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    2. Celiac Disease - Parents of Kids or Babies With Celiac Disease

      Discussions with other parents of kids or babies with celiac disease.

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      54,440
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    3. Gab/Chat Room - To Discuss Anything BUT Celiac Disease / Gluten-Free Diet

      General Chat Unrelated to Celiac Disease - Discuss most things here EXCEPT Celiac Disease / Gluten-Free Diet. Please keep it light and avoid controversial topics.

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    4. Celiac Disease - Doctors

      Discuss experiences with doctors, how to find a doctor, etc.

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    5. Celiac Disease - Teenagers & Young Adults Only

      This area is where Teenagers and Young Adults can discuss issues related to celiac disease and the gluten-free diet.

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      6,963
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    6. Celiac Disease - Pregnancy

      Discussions related to being pregnant with celiac disease.

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    7. Celiac Disease - Friends and Loved Ones of Celiacs

      Non-celiacs discuss their experiences dealing with a friend or loved one with the disease.

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    8. Celiac Meeting Room

      A Place where gluten-free people can meet each other--Adults only please.

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    9. Celiac Disease - Sleep

      Discussions concerning sleeping problems and celiac disease.

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    10. Celiac Disease - Support Groups

      Discussions concerning celiac disease support groups and support group meetings.

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  3. Gluten-Free Lifestyle

    1. Gluten-Free Foods, Products, Shopping & Medications

      Discussions regarding which mainstream products are gluten-free and which are not.

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    2. Gluten-Free Recipes - Baking & Cooking Tips

      Discussions about gluten-free baking and cooking.

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    3. Gluten-Free Restaurants

      Discussions about dining out gluten-free.

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    4. Gluten-Free Ingredients & Food Labeling Issues

      Discussions regarding which ingredients are safe and which are not, and food labeling issues.

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      16,967
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    5. Celiac Disease - Publications & Publicity

      Discussions related to books, articles and other press about celiac disease.

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    6. Gluten-Free Travel

      Discussions concerning how to maintain a gluten-free diet while traveling, including great gluten-free places to visit.

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    7. Gluten-Free Diet & Weight Issues

      Discussions about how to lose or gain weight while on a gluten-free diet.

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    8. Gluten-Free International Room (Outside USA)

      Discussions about living gluten-free in Canada, Australia, Asia & Pacific Rim, UK, Europe, etc.

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    9. Gluten-Free Sports and Fitness

      Gluten-free athletes discuss fitness, sports nutrition, working out, etc.

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  4. When A Gluten-Free Diet Just Isn't Enough

    1. Other Food Intolerance and Leaky Gut Issues

      Discussions about additional non-gluten food intolerance issues, including cow's milk (casein), soy, eggs, corn, etc.

      2,274
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    2. Super Sensitive Celiacs & Gluten Sensitive

      Non-scientific discussions for those who have been gluten free for at least 6-12 months and suspect they are reacting to lower levels of gluten than the vast majority of celiacs.

      405
      topics
      5,564
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    3. Alternative Diets

      Discussions about alternative diets like the Vegetarian Diet, Specific Carbohydrate Diet (SCD), The Low FODMAP Diet. (FODMAP=Fermentable Oligo-Di-Monosaccharides and Polyols), etc.

      30
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      336
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  5. Forum Technical Assistance

    1. Board/Forum Technical Help

      This section deals with questions and problems related to the use of this forum. All "old pros" are invited to help answer questions from the newer participants.

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  • Who's Online   5 Members, 0 Anonymous, 298 Guests (See full list)

  • Popular Contributors

  • Recent Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Could Gluten-Free Eating Leave You Alone and Misjudged?
    Celiac.com 10/23/2018 - As if being on a gluten-free diet for medical reasons weren’t hard enough already, with it’s numerous logistical and social challenges, now comes a new study that spells out the thoughts of the general public about gluten-free dieters, and the picture it paints isn’t pretty.
    Nearly half of people who responded to a recent survey said that they would judge someone on a gluten-free diet as "selfish, demanding and difficult to please." Another 44 percent say that people who eat a gluten-free diet are "high maintenance," while more than 30 percent call gluten-free eaters "selfish" and 14 percent presume they must be "arrogant." When it comes to questions of dating, More than 40 percent of those surveyed would be reluctant to date someone who was gluten-free, while 10 percent of respondents feared that they would be judged poorly by their gluten-free date.  
    The study by researchers from Western Connecticut State University is the first study of its kind. In it, researchers asked 161 adults if they would date somebody who is gluten-free. Most participants expressed reservations bout dating people on a gluten-free diet.
    Researchers had another group of 132 people participate in an online dating scenario in which they were told to "imagine going on a first date with an individual who discloses adhering to a gluten-free diet." Participants then rated their prospective date on factors such as perceived kindness, mood, pickiness, and femininity or masculinity. Interestingly, women on a gluten-free diet were perceived to be more feminine.
    Some participants claimed they would be more understanding if a person cut out gluten due to an allergy rather than just as part of a fad diet.
    The good news is that six percent of those surveyed view gluten-free eaters as "understanding," while three percent see them as "happy," "energetic," and "self-disciplined." 
    Its unclear how closely the results of this particular survey reflect the sentiments of the general public, but you can read more results in the DailyMail.com.

    Jefferson Adams
    High Gluten Consumption During Pregnancy May Increase Type 1 Diabetes Risk for Children
    Celiac.com 10/22/2018 - A team of researchers recently set out to determine if there is any association between prenatal gluten exposure and offspring risk of type 1 diabetes in humans.
    The research team first designed a national prospective cohort study using the national health information registries in Denmark. They looked at data on pregnant Danish women enrolled into the Danish National Birth Cohort, between January 1996 and October 2002, and assessed maternal gluten intake, based on maternal consumption of gluten containing foods, as reported in a 360 item food frequency questionnaire at week 25 of pregnancy.
    The team gathered information on type 1 diabetes occurrence in the participants’ children, from 1 January 1996 to 31 May 2016 by linking to the Danish Registry of Childhood and Adolescent Diabetes.
    Overall, their study included data on 101,042 pregnancies in 91,745 women, of whom 70,188 filled out the food frequency questionnaire. Once they corrected the figures to account for multiple pregnancies, pregnancies ending in abortions, stillbirths, lack of information regarding the pregnancy, and pregnancies with implausibly high or low energy intake, they included 67,565 pregnancies and 63,529 women.
    Gluten intake averaged 13.0 grams per day, ranging from under 7 grams per day to more than 20 grams per day. There were 247 children with type 1 diabetes among the group, for an incidence rate of 0.37%, with an average follow-up of 15.6 years.
    Risk of type 1 diabetes in offspring increased proportionally with maternal gluten intake during pregnancy per 10 grams per day increase of gluten. Compared to women with the lowest gluten intake of under 7 grams per day, those with the highest gluten intake who consumed 20 or more grams a day had double the risk for type 1 diabetes development in their children.
    These numbers indicate that high gluten intake by mothers during pregnancy may increase the risk of their children developing type 1 diabetes. However, the team is calling for further study to confirm the findings, preferably in an intervention setting.
    Read more in BMJ 2018;362:k3547. doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.k3547
     
    The research team included Julie C Antvorskov, assistant professor, Thorhallur I Halldorsson, professor in food science and nutrition, Knud Josefsen, senior researcher, Jannet Svensson, associate professor5, Charlotta Granström, statistician, Bart O Roep, professor, Trine H Olesen, research assistant, Laufey Hrolfsdottir, director, Karsten Buschard, professor, and Sjudur F Olsen, adjunct professor of nutrition.
    They are variously affiliated with the Bartholin Institute, Rigshospitalet in Copenhagen, Denmark; the Centre for Foetal Programming, Department of Epidemiology Research, Statens Serum Institute, Copenhagen, Denmark; the Unit for Nutrition Research, Landspitali University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland; the Faculty of Food Science and Nutrition, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland; the Copenhagen Diabetes Research Center (CPH-DIRECT), Department of Children and Adolescents, Copenhagen University Hospital Herlev, Herlev, Denmark; the Department of Diabetes Immunology, Diabetes and Metabolism Research Institute at the Beckman Diabetes Research Institute, City of Hope, Duarte, CA, USA; the Departments of Immunohematology and Blood Transfusion, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, Netherlands; the Department of Education, Science, and Quality, Akureyri Hospital, Akureyri, Iceland; and the Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.

    Jefferson Adams
    Vanilla Apple Gratin (Gluten-Free)
    Celiac.com 10/20/2018 - All the flavor of vanilla ice cream melting into the warm orchard-fresh apple pie, but more quickly, with less sugar and fat? Yes, please! This easy to make dessert is a perfect substitute for cobbler, and much quicker and easier than pie.And yes, it tastes like vanilla ice cream melting into apple pie!
    Ingredients:
    5 Gala or Granny Smith apples (about 2½ pounds) 1 vanilla bean or 1 tablespoon vanilla bean paste or vanilla extract 2 tablespoons butter ¼ cup whipping cream 3 egg yolks 2 tablespoons sugar ¼ cup sparkling wine, like Prosecco or cheap Champagne Salt Directions:
    Peel and core the apples. Cut each into 12 wedges. Set aside.
    Melt butter in a 12-inch broiler-safe skillet over medium-high heat. 
    Split the vanilla bean lengthwise and scrape the seeds into the skillet, and add the bean, as well. 
    Add apples; sprinkle with a generous pinch of salt. 
    Cook, stirring occasionally, 10 to 15 minutes or until apples are deeply golden and tender. 
    Remove vanilla bean.
    Meanwhile, heat broiler. In a medium bowl, whip cream to soft peaks. Keep chilled.
    Heat 1 inch of water in bottom of a double boiler; bring just to a simmer. 
    In top of double boiler, whisk together egg yolks, sugar and a pinch of salt; add wine and whisk continuously about 3 to 5 minutes until mixture is thickened and has doubled in volume. DO NOT BOIL!  
    Remove from heat; whisk 1 minute to set and put aside to cool. 
    Fold in whipped cream until just combined.
    Spoon cream mixture over apples in the skillet.
    Broil 4 to 5 inches from the heat for 1 to 2 minutes or until topping begins to turn golden. 
    Serve hot.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac Disease Research Could Lead to Diabetes Vaccine
    Celiac.com 10/19/2018 - Work to develop a vaccine for celiac disease could soon lead to a vaccine for diabetes.
    After successful phase 1 studies of Nexvax2, their peptide-based therapeutic vaccine for celiac disease, ImmusanT has seen a significant investment from venture philanthropy organization JDRF T1D. ImmusanT's peptide therapy program for celiac disease may provide lessons for a similar therapeutic treatment for Type 1 diabetes.
    The investment will support ImmusanT as it attempts to develop a vaccine to prevent Type 1 diabetes, based on the early success of its peptide immunotherapy program for celiac disease, the two entities announced in a press release.
    ImmusanT’s celiac peptide therapy program works by identifying antigens that trigger an inflammatory responses in people with autoimmune diseases. Once identified, the peptide therapy is used to neutralize the autoimmune response. This celiac disease program goes back to 1998, when Anderson first began his efforts to find and identify the peptides. 
    The findings were published in 2010, and the company was founded shortly afterward by Leslie Williams, BS, RN, MBA, director, president and CEO of ImmusanT. 
    From there, ImmusanT conducted five phase 1 trials for its celiac therapy. Those trials have proven very promising, and the latest investment into a similar drug for diabetes is proof of that promise. In the case of celiac disease, the drug works by “targeting T cells in patients. Those T cells that are engaged as peptides are distributed throughout the body after the injection, and we see evidence that the T cells are being activated about 2 hours later,” Robert Anderson, BMedSc, MB, ChB, PhD, FRACP, chief scientific officer for ImmusanT, told Endocrine Today. “We found that if we gradually increase the dose in patients building up to a maintenance dose level, they become non-reactive to those peptides.”
    With much of the early research targeted towards demonstrating the drug’s safety, and getting the right dose and dose regimen, the development of a version targeted at diabetes, says Anderson, “should be more streamlined due to the lessons learned during the celiac disease program.
    That’s partly because the team knows “a lot more going into Type 1 diabetes about how peptide therapy works and how to optimize it than we did when we started celiac disease, where it was a blank slate.”
    This is really exciting news. A vaccine for celiac disease is exciting, to be sure, but a viable vaccine for diabetes would be a major development in disease prevention. Stay tuned for more news as the story develops. 
    Read more at Healio.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Human Leukocyte Antigen DQ2/DQ8 More Common in Women with History of Stillbirth
    Celiac.com 10/18/2018 - A team of researchers recently set out to investigate the prevalence of human leukocyte antigens (HLA) DQ2 and DQ8 haplotypes, two common polymorphisms associate with celiac disease, in women who have had previous stillbirth, but who do not have celiac disease.
    The research team included Mauro Cozzolino, Caterina Serena, Antonino Salvatore Calabró, Elena Savi Marianna, Pina Rambaldi, Serena Simeone, and Serena Ottanelli, Giorgio Mello, Giovanni Rombolá, Gianmarco Troiano, Nicola Nante, Silvia Vannuccini, Federico Mecacci, and Felice Petraglia. They are variously affiliated with the Division of Obstetrics and Gynecology, and the Department of Experimental and Clinical Biomedical Sciences, Gastroenterology Unit, at Careggi University Hospital, University of Florence in Florence, Italy.
    For their study, the team enrolled 56 women with history of unexplained term stillbirth referred to our Center for High‐Risk Pregnancies for a preconception counseling. As a control group, they enrolled 379 women with previous uncomplicated pregnancies. They excluded women with celiac women from the study. 
    The team then conducted genetic tests for HLA DQ2/DQ8 on both groups, and compared patients data against controls. They found that 50% of women with history of unexplained term stillbirth tested positive for HLA‐DQ2 or DQ8, compared with just 29.5% for controls. Women with HLA DQ8 genotype showed a substantially higher risk of stillbirth (OR: 2.84 CI: 1.1840‐6.817).
    For patients with the DQ2 genotype, the OR for stillbirth was even higher, at 4.46 with a CI of 2.408‐8.270. In the stillbirth group, the team found that SGA neonates in 85.7% those with HLA‐DQ2/DQ8 haplotypes, and in just 42.8% with negative genetic testing.
    The team found significantly higher rates of HLA DQ2/DQ8 haplotypes in women with history of unexplained term stillbirth than in women with previous uneventful pregnancies.  Moreover, they found that HLA DQ2/DQ8 positivity was significantly associated with suboptimal fetal growth in intrauterine fetal death cases, as shown by an increased prevalence of SGA babies.
    This study will definitely be of interest to women with HLA DQ2/DQ8 haplotypes, and to those who have experienced unexplained stillbirths. Stay tuned for more information on this important topic as news becomes available.
    Read more at: American Journal of Reproductive Immunology

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