Jump to content
  • Sign Up

Blogs

 

Food Recall Warning (Allergen) - Kim Châu brand Spring Roll recalled due to undeclared egg and wheat

Kim Châu Vietnamese Deli Ltd. is recalling Kim Châu brand Spring Roll from the marketplace because it contains egg and may contain wheat which are not declared on the label. People who have an allergy to egg or wheat, celiac disease or other gluten-related disorders should not consume the recalled product described below. Recalled products Brand Name Common Name Size Code(s) on Product    UPC Kim Châu Spring Roll None All packages where egg and wheat are not declared on the label    6 22384 00010 2

Scott Adams

Scott Adams

 

September Update 2018

So I am doing alright, I am getting over that exposure from last month stil....YAY random diarrhea 2-6 times a day...I am starting to wonder if by chance one of my meds changed...sorta want to try that gluten detective and see...but since the obvious exposure the other symptoms aside from the diarrhea have all stopped...it has me stumped if this just the new normal.

I am started up a new business "------ Paleo ------- ---" (censored it as the mods will not let me give names) it is the same name I intend for my food truck, I formed the LLC. I am doing catering right now, selling at farmers markets. I have some odd stipulations with the health department IE I can not cater anywhere but a church right now...has to do with the kitchen facilities and licensing.
The business is Paleo diet based, we do "Paleo Burger" Bun less burgers with a 1/4lb Angus or turkey patty between two chunks of green leaf lettuce. with add ons like guacamole, turkey bacon, vegan cheese, a secret house sauce blend, and condiments like a corn free ketchup and mustard.....those get expensive.
I plan on doing a stir fry menu with beef, broccoli and doing a Texas take with bell peppers and onions in it? trying to figure out the ratios but thinking 5lbs broccoli to 3lbs peppers and onions? Feed back welcome, will be using a blend of Coconut secret aminos and teriyaki sauce.
And a breakfast menu, thinking build a bowl, eggs, turkey bacon, shredded hash browns, maybe turkey sausage, and beef chroizo, heck can do green chili in with the eggs or hash for obrian style and this is to be later tried out in a few weeks
This week we are featuring the "Cave Man Burger" double patty version.
Food truck is a go btw, a local dealer ship will give me the 30k for sponsor ship in early 2019.

Bakery....well since we now have gluten free, cheap breads in most grocery stores people hardly come to me aside from a few dedicated customers....same with almond butters .... depressive really.

Few other life quirks, Ouros my bearded dragon...little princess there is being cranky about her food,  no longer accepting live feeders from her dish, she makes me pick them up and feed her one at a time..... but she clears a quarter cup of collard greens a meal, and loves meal worms but they are like junk food for dragons and only supposed to be fed in moderation as they can cause impactation. I find it funny we both live on high protein and deep green veggies lol. I just invested in buying a Point Of Sale set up...fracked up part buy everything separate on ebay and pay $269....buy from companies pay $779-$1200 I came out on top there and the analytical data I get on sales is marvelous and allows people to order at the kiosk and keep inventory. OH and I think I screwed myself on money....going to probably run out this month after getting meds and almonds....I spent some money trying to get stuff for others, being nice, and investing in my new business. Hoping karma/god helps out.

 

Ennis_TX

Ennis_TX

 

Day 9 of gluten-free

I'm progressing nicely, but still hitting bumps along the way. Last night I went to a Japanese steakhouse and thought I made great choices until it dawned on me this morning that imitation crabmeat has wheat in it as a binder. I also tried a bite of seaweed salad and enjoyed every flavor until I realized it had soy sauce in the dressing. The rice paper was a nice alternative to a traditional wonton type wrapper. At the very least, a hard cider to drink was a safe move in the area of alcoholic beverages. This morning I not only ate one small pancake while cooking them, as I usually limit myself to. Rather I cooked the full recipe and sat down with my kids to enjoy pancakes, bacon, and fruit all together. I used Bob's Red Mill Gluten-free Pancake Mix and the kids couldn't tell the difference. I was impressed with the fluffiness and moistness of the pancakes. Feeling confident in my flour substitutions, I opted to make brownies after dinner using Bob's Red Mill 1-to-1 Gluten-free flour. The taste was there, but they were a little fragile. The brownies were still a bit warm, so I am curious as to how they will be once cooled.

Ms. A

Ms. A

 

Day 7 of gluten-free

Here I am a week into this lifestyle change and hoping I am on the right track. In general my digestive system feels better, but I seem to be constantly finding gluten hidden in things I wouldn't think of. Yesterday's discovery happened while reading the ingredients to an Italian dressing packet. I wouldn't have guessed that it would have wheat in it. Other learning curves are happening as I study labels, noticing where they clearly state "gluten free" and where I am left questioning the food. Most packages have the "CONTAINS:" area in which I check for it to say wheat. However, I realize that wheat isn't the only thing that has gluten. My appointment today with a nutritionist had to be rescheduled due to unforeseen circumstances. I have the appointment rescheduled for next week and am looking forward to getting more education on this topic.

Ms. A

Ms. A

 

Day 2 of gluten-free

A couple of weeks ago I received confirmation of what I had suspected for quite some time... I have celiac disease. Feeling that wheat doesn't digest well is different then knowing that it doesn't digest well. The formal confirmation is still sinking in... At first I was resistant and continued to eat wheat on occasion. I then became determined to give the gluten-free way of life a try in hopes that I would feel better. I then spent several days limiting my gluten intake all day to only crave and "treat" myself to something with gluten by the evening. It wasn't working and was feeling like a roller coaster. I finally dug my heals into my own cravings and knee I had to draw the line. Here I am on day two of gluten-free nourishment! I feel nourished and haven't had any stomach cramping and bloating. I am craving all the things I shouldn't have like pizza, bagels, a sub...as expected. However, I somehow managed to spend an entire dinner watching four children eat two of my favorite foods, fresh pizza and subs, while I enjoyed a chef salad (no croutons, of course). I think there's hope for this lifestyle change, but will need to be patient with myself. I look forward to feeling better and learning how to best nourish my body. I also look forward to passing on the information and experience to anyone who it may benefit.

Ms. A

Ms. A

 

Steps for Recovery

This is a personal note to myself on things to remember next time and things to consider.

If unsure of exposure take glidenX next few meals, blend and nima test samples of ingredients used to see if it was something you fixed.

THOW AWAY that tooth brush....you brushed after getting glutened...your brush is contaminated....

MAKE SURE to add a extra 2 tsp of Liquid Health Energy& Stress and Neurological support between standard dosing, this will help with anxiety and suicidal thoughts that will hit a few days after exposure
LOWER Magnesium Citrate and start using a bit more Magnesium Glycinate to reduce loose stools, and deal with the surge of magnesium deficiency issues that will arise over the next few weeks.
UP dose of slippery elm and marshmallow to soothe the intestines.
CBD oil, and eat hemp meal (mygerbs mill your own), and pumpkin seeds protein (jarrow) Helps with serotonin and melotonin regulation.

DO NOT eat any spicy food, foods with peppers, vinegar, strong in onion, garlic, or acidic foods. Change to a herb seasoned meals, super soft, Italian and french based herb blends work...your stomach is essentially carpet burned treat it that way.
Egg dishes are your friend, make them in the microwave super soft and mushy, no hard edges or those chunks that are tough. Mix about half half nut milk and eggs, blend in 1-2tbsp each of coconut flour, almond flour, mashed veggies, Jarrow bone broth powder, and feel free to thicken with 1-3 tsp of psyillum husk should make about 24oz...will help make your stools pies instead of liquid.
Protein shakes with similar blends and nut meal poridge with just nut milk, almond butter, coconut flour and a scoop of protein powder,

Personal notes, avoid foods that are even a tiny bit corny, allergies are much worse ...you react to things that used to be ok, Citric Acid, gums, propylene glycol, meats sold on those corn laden white blood absorbers under them (go to the back and ask for a pack without),
Stay away from nori, sea weed, or iodine products....your will find they make skin and other reactions worse.
 

Ennis_TX

Ennis_TX

 

4 Day Convention away from home

So I am currently away from my home for 4 days on a convention and sharing a room with normal people for room mates. I set up the rules of no foods other then what I bring in the room, and no eating outside of the room then coming back in, let me prepare all meals and provide all snacks....not quite well observed so far.

SO I brought a mini fridge, coffee maker, induction cook top, skillet and lid, measuring cups, disposable plates and utensils, all my own spices, knifes, condiments, hand blender etc.

I bought for me and THEM, NY Strip Steaks, eggs, egg whites, turkey bacon, Turkey sausage, ham steaks,  siete foods grain free tortilla, salad, pulled pork BBQ, dairy free cheeses (Miyoko Sharp Cheddar, and lisanatti shreds), kielbasas, apple gate beef hot dogs, epic salmon bars, potato chips, protes chips, dried okra, rice chips, nutzo butter, and things from my bakery like my "Little Italy Paleo Bread", Sugar Free Honey Paleo Rolls, "Apple Pie Almond butter muffins" Sugar free and grain free, "Davids Almond Butter Muffins" (a sugars free almond butter based grain free muffins with egg nog extract), Austin Ciders Honey Cider 24 pack, Barefoot Pick moscaoto 1.75L, James Harbor Rum 1.75L, bubbly sparkling water, zevia sodas, Pepsi Cane sugar, green teas, etc.

So I learned they eat a ton less then me first off....but they already drank ALL the liquor in 2 days....yeah a guy and his girl friend, they broke the rules once and brought in food, but I do not think that has been my source of issues.

I have gotten sick 3 times, I am popping gliden X every meal, there is flour, pastries, and gluten and corn food being eaten by everyone else here....I feel like I am in a rat poison factory. First day was just a vomit, second night ....only thing I did was drink water from a water COOLER, and brush my teeth and 4 hours later I had full ataxia attack and could not move....I have concluded that, the cooler got me, the water was refilled from the kitchen sink at the hotel.....BUT I got it last night no so much the ataxia but vomiting SOO hard I was blowing out capillaries in my mouth, nose, throat and bleeding, and I have read blood dots under my skin in my face this morning from rupturing them....I only brushed my teeth last night.....I did observe my room mate using my tooth paste tube and put tooth paste on this brush.......I think I found my CC issue....who knows

They are paying good, I am getting $500 to cook for them for the 4 days, First night I served up New York Strip and salad with wine. Morning the next day I did left over steak in scrambled eggs with siesta foods grain free tortillas, Migas with said tortillas and eggs for lunch, dinner was pulled pork and BBQ sauce, breakfast the next day was my paleo bread toast, eggs, turkey bacon, Lunch was pulled pork BBQ and dinner was Ham steaks and salad with toasted bread and lisanatti cheese, breakfast today is that Italian paleo bread with melted lissanatti mozzarella on it for cheese bread, turky bacon, and eggs, unsure on lunch today but either BBQ or kielbasa,might do the ham steaks and salad again.

Ennis_TX

Ennis_TX

Vegan Bacon Bits

Vegan Bacon Bits Combine
4 tbsp Coconut Secret Coconut Aminos
4 tbsp Colgin Liquid Smoke
3 tsp Lakanto Maple
1 1/2 tsp Smoked Paprika 1. Preheat oven to 270F
2. Mix well then dump in 7-8 Oz of Let's do Organic Unsweetened Toasted Coconut Flakes make sure to mix and coat well then let set 5-10 mins
3. Place on foil lined baking sheets and turn the oven to 200F and bake 30-35 mins check then turn off oven and leave in there for a hour to dry out. NOTE ingredients bought through the Thrive  link get you a extra 25% off, great for gluten free shopping.
Thrive Market http://thrv.me/gf25
https://thrivemarket.com/coconut-secret-organic-raw-coconut-aminos
https://thrivemarket.com/lets-do-organic-toasted-coconut-flakes-unsweetened
https://www.luckyvitamin.com/p-2001037-lakanto-maple-flavored-syrup-sweetened-with-monk-fruit-13-oz
https://www.amazon.com/Colgin-Assorted-Liquid-Smoke-Gift/dp/B00H5WG6IG/ref=sr_1_7_a_it?ie=UTF8&qid=1512309885&sr=8-7&keywords=Liquid+smoke

Ennis_TX

Ennis_TX

 

So stressed😩😕

Hey ,I just found out that I have celiac and that I have to go on a gluten free  diet. The bad thing about this is that I’m a really picky eater and I’m scared and stressed about how this will effect my life....😩😐😕

Shelby_101

Shelby_101

 

How long did you go undiagnosed?

I had the following symptoms for 20 years: asthma, exteme fatigue, dental issues,bloating, gas, metallic taste in my mouth , itching, rash, hot flashes, pale skin, early menopause, numbness, nausea.  It ALL went away after I stopped eating wheat.  No thanks to allergist or derm.

marie1122

marie1122

 

July Update

SO it started off and has been very rough these past few weeks.
I kept having issues finding a new car, found one much cheaper and I just have to wait 2 weeks for it.
The Food Truck, working on getting a new LLC corporation filed for the truck then I can apply for offical financing. My initial inquires for financing were ignored or denied as the new venture did not have its own LLC and a bank account yet, and lending to a individual or a different business....well just looks bad on books for that kind of money.

I had a major catering job cancel on me...so looks like I lost out on a $300-600 job I was expecting.....I had already gotten new chaffers, food pans, etc. and invested in the larger crowd also.

I got to admit, if you want a pet and you have Celiac....get a lizard. No really they require calcium, and vitamin D like us, they require a low carb high fat/protein diet with dark leafy green veggies....at least bearded dragons do. I learned so much about food relations thanks to him...like you can not feed them too much spinach or certain greens or they bind with calcium and other nutrients and how high oxilates are bad for them.......DO NOT buy them processed food as most contains gluten. Go with a whole food only diet for your bearded dragon just like you would yourself. ....well almost, they eat crickets, and roaches instead of chicken and beef, .....BUT you can treat them with a tiny bit of eggs every now and then lol...he also loves tiny bits of shrimp.

Money wise....has been such a slump unable to go to farmers markets without a car....I have had some crazy thoughts go though my mind to get money.

Ennis_TX

Ennis_TX

 

Gluten-Free Beer Maker Glutenberg Recalls Non-alcoholic Beer Because it Contains Alcohol

The Glutenberg Microbrewery announces that it is voluntarily recalling certain "Glutenberg non-alcoholic" brand beer beverages because of a higher alcohol content than indicated on the package. Only packaging with cans bearing lot code 24606298 and the expiry date of March 29, 2019 are affected by this recall. Tests on previous batches of "Glutenberg without alcohol" had confirmed that they all contained an alcohol level corresponding to that indicated on the packaging, ie 0.1%. The analyzes of lot 24606298, however, revealed that the latter contained an alcohol content of 3.4%. "We do not compromise on the products we offer to consumers. We decided to proceed with this voluntary recall because it is important for us that consumers have the right time when they buy our products and can always trust that they are getting exactly the product they have chosen. Corrective measures have already been put in place to validate the alcohol content of this product even more accurately and to prevent this from happening again, "said David Cayer , Chief Executive Officer . Most of this lot has already been recovered before being sold. All retailers were also contacted to have the product removed from the shelves. Consumers who have purchased these products can take them back to their retailer for a refund or contact the company at info@glutenberg.ca. About the Glutenberg Microbrewery Glutenberg Microbrewery is a leader in the gluten-free beer segment. Winner of 5 World Beer Cup awards and 21 awards at the Canadian Brewing Awards, she is recognized as the world's best gluten-free microbrewery. Glutenberg Microbrewery's sales reach more than 2,000,000 L per year in 10 Canadian provinces, 26 US states and 8 countries. Source: newswire.ca
 

Quorn recalls a batch of its 2 Gluten Free Burgers packs because of undeclared gluten

Quorn is recalling packs of 2 Gluten Free Burgers because they contain undeclared gluten
which is not mentioned on the label. This means the product is a possible health risk for
anyone with an allergy or intolerance to gluten. Product details: Product: Quorn 2 Gluten Free Burgers Pack size: 2 pack (227g) Batch code: 708049 Best Before: 30-Nov-19 No other Quorn products are known to be affected
Risk: Gluten This product contains gluten making it a possible health risk for anyone with an allergy or intolerance to gluten. Our advice to consumers:
If you have bought the above product and have an allergy or intolerance to gluten do not eat it. Instead return it to the store from where it was bought for a full refund. Action taken by the company:
Quorn is recalling the above product from customers and has contacted the relevant allergy support organisations, who will tell their members about the recall. The company has also issued a point-of-sale notice to its customers. These notices explain to customers why the product is being recalled and tell them what to do if they have bought the product. Please see the attached notice. Source: food.gov.uk
 

Paleo Food Truck and Catering

SO life is a mess, and sink or swim. I had to sell my car last week, the market is slow as all hell recently and 2 of my regular customers for my bakery moved. SO I am shifting my focus to catering and my dream food truck.
I just finished redoing my food manager certifications, setting up contracts for whole sale accounts with companies. Cleaning out and fixing the back of my buildings shop area for a commissionary to park a food truck in.
I am working with Chef Units out of Houston for a truck build....due to the nature of Celiac and UC I am having them special build a food truck from scratch all new equipment and a bathroom that opens to the outside (for obvious reasons). Right now we are in the quoting phase and design plans. I am seeking grants and help from my local city with this truck, getting a fundraiser up and going, and seeking financing for the truck. I am looking at a 120K...I use about 100k to build the truck, then the other 20k to start the business, pay permits, insurance, LLC fees, outfit the kitchen, and get product to start. GOD I WISH we had more celiacs here.....I could use some opinions on menu and some help....I would honestly out of paranoia only trust a fellow celiac to work in my truck. Just a personal view...would would anyone else with this disease trust a normal person in a FOOD TRUCK to cook you a 100% safe dish?

Menu in the business plan looks like this Comments please
Mixed veggie stir fry using locally sourced vegetables, and meats with options of carb free noodles or over carb free rice seasoned with a non-soy or wheat sauce from coconut secret in either a teriyaki or garlic base. Also have choices for meat alternatives.  
Bun less Burgers, with either Turkey Burgers, or Beef, with the standard burger options of Bacon, Pickles, onions, condiments like Secret Sauce, Ketchup, Mustard. And Diary free cheese like Smoked Gouda, Mozzarella And possible Lettuce Wraps 
Pasta with konjac based carb free noodles with homemade thick sauce and served with a side of a nut-based garlic bread or toast from Mikey’s.  
Fresh Fries seasoned with blends from Big Axe Spice company and melted cheeses. Thinking making it our own and option to serve with Pizza Sauce. 
   Breakfast lines will consist of Eggs, Turkey Bacon, Sausage, Low Carb English Muffins from Mikey’s, and Muffins tops from them. We are also thinking of using their grain free tortillas as a Add in Item.                 
   Other options will be considered for limited or menu rotations such as kabobs, steaks, shredded Pork, Baked Fish, breakfast bowls, and grain free pancakes.  
We will be doing catering and can be booked for events, I have chafers, food pans, etc. And can do crowds up to 200 (calculated)

Food truck is outfitted with the following by build specs.
15" CharBroiler Grill
36" Countertop Griddle
6 burner 36" Range with 27" oven
15" 40lb deep fryer (should I upgrade to a 21" 70lb?)
24" Salamander Melter (broiler)
Small microwave
48" Three Pan Steam Table
30" 23 cubic foot Freezer
30" 20cubic food Fridge
24" glass front 14cubic food beverage fridge (will have cane sugar cokes, water, zevia soda, and sparkling water)
42" TV with Munu Software
Point of Sale system, cash drawer, credit card reader.

WITH the Above give me other menu ideas for quick (under 6mins) food ideas and menu items that are paleo and grain free.

Ennis_TX

Ennis_TX

 

Corn Conundrum

So I am allergic to corn...in a odd way. Corn starch, corn flour, corn syrup, corn oil will give me blood blister in my mouth and a 99-103F fever. Skin contact will cause a red sunburn looking rash that if not washed will start getting more like poison ivy....
Some derivatives from corn do not bother me, xylitol, erythritol, fibersol, etc.
I used to think citric acid and xantham gum from corn were in this line up as they failed to give me the mouth blisters but apparently it has other effects.

I have been using Daiya cheese in my Paleo catering business, I had someone else contact me with a corn allergy pointing out it contained corn....there is non in the ingredients...I do not eat it because the xantham gum makes me feel a bit nauseated. I emailed Daiya and learned the citric acid and xantham gum are made from corn. I proceeded to force myself to eat 2-3 slices of the cheese a day as a test.....no mouth sores....BUT I did start getting a low grade fever...but it was quite delayed. The late onset of the reaction makes me think the proteins I react to are mostly broken down but still present to be found by my gut. (much like some can have a lesser reaction to gluten removed beers as some of the proteins are broken down)

I have since contacted many companies to find what is what with corn. I have found Miyoko, and Leaf Cuisine Cheeses do not contain corn at all. Kite hill the ricotta, plain, and the dill and chive is safe. Pamela Creamery...the melt cheeses contain corn. So delicious contains cornstarch. Waiting to hear back from Lisanatti, and Tree line.

I found that some condiments I was using from Sir Kingstons the citric acid is sugar can derived but the few with xantham gum are corn but they swear the end product is processed enough that the proteins are not present where it could illicit a allergic reaction.
Primal Kitchen is Corn Free
I am waiting on Organicville to get back to me.


Still waiting a few other companies to come through on these things I will post comments on this on anything else I might find.
 

Ennis_TX

Ennis_TX

 

July Update

July update,
I am really pushing catering...I have to. Trouble at the market with a new baker is driving me mad, late onset gluten exposure + her new ideas....it had me suicidal at my purpose and reason for being alive being taken away. Frankly my Saturday sales....used to be $30-120 a saturday, she has come along and started offering "Gluten Free" and refined sugar free baked goods out of her gluten kitchen with, with warnings. And my saturday profits are in the hole with -$20 to a maximum of $26. Most my customers were Fad dieters. She is selling to them and is extremely charismatic, pushing her foods on people giving away samples of both gluten and gluten free foods....she is claiming 40 years experience and that her parents were pastry chefs.
She is over qualified, she also sells arts and crafts, does music and instrument lessons, does cake decorating classes, cooking classes, she just moved here and took over. I was talking with her about sending her celiac customers to me since I can meet the medical gluten free needs (my sole purpose for being alive) and she says....that she has gotten new equipment for doing gluten free dedicated......I mention flour stays airborne for hours...and she says she will cook the gluten free on a different day...well yeah but that flour is going to settle on your gluten free cooking stuff......she is insisting she can do it......crap....I had a melt down when I got home.

My issues.....My brain damage took away my dreams of doing computer programing, my nerve damage took away my love of games, and I can not work controls precise enough now to enjoy or compete on them. This works with cooking as I can cut myself and glue it shut, burn myself and keep going.....
I have autism not much choice but this makes social interactions and promoting a business damn hard, talking to engaging people requires me to constantly tell myself to "look them in eye" "engage them" "try to find common ground" and constantly fight the urges to say what I want. I have to be alone a good part of the day and process things, go over things, and run scenarios in my head. I can not deal with people constantly.
Cooking is all I have left, my dad told me that this disease is a guiding light to show me what to do with my life...I started baking to give myself purpose when I was previously running a bucket list. THIS IS MY LIFE. My only reason to be alive is to cook, bake, and help people on these forums. Other wise I am a burden to my family...they have to pay for my medical expenses and rent. HELL the only thing keeping me from stupid things is 1. I have a lizard that needs me to keep it. 2. My insurance on my life has a suicide clause in effect. 3. The forums where I am needed to help people.

I took all my savings...even for my planned surgery to remove the infected abscess in my upper jaw...and used it to invest in catering pans, fuel, utensils etc......frack if the infection kills me at least life insurance will still pay out, I need a reason to live. I am lining up catering contracts with a church and my highschool class reunion.....hoping to get a investor for that food truck....hell might try asking on reddit lol.

Life otherwise is quite uneventful and my mind is swamped with trying to fix these issues at hand....I can not think of anything else other then finding my purpose in life. I wrote up a letter explaining my situation for the other baker......I think I will email it to her...it was emotional and pointing out that despite her good intentions she is a very negative influence to my life and well being.....

Ennis_TX

Ennis_TX

Southern Keto Coleslaw

Southern Keto Coleslaw (Sweet with a tang)
2lb shredded cabbage
70g grated carrot (5 baby carrots)
1/4 medium onion sliced thin strip (Mandolin cutter on the shallow setting is perfect for this)
220g (about a heaping 3/4 cup) mayo
3 tbsp (45g) Apple Cider Vinegar
2 tbsp Mustard
2-6tbsp Swerve (or other erythritol like pyure, truvia adjust to taste) Combine and mix mayo, mustard, sweeteners, vinegar then add in the rest mixing til well combined. (I like putting on gloves and using a claw and twist like working burger) Let it set overnight, if it needs more tang or sweetener then add to adjust. I find it best served with a few cracks of black pepper.

Extra 25% off your first order with Thrive Market http://thrv.me/gf25
https://thrivemarket.com/p/organicville-stone-ground-mustard
https://thrivemarket.com/p/bragg-organic-apple-cider-vinegar
https://thrivemarket.com/p/primal-kitchen-avocado-oil-mayo
https://thrivemarket.com/p/swerve-granular-sugar-replacement

Ennis_TX

Ennis_TX

Samon Cakes, Grain Free

Salmon Cakes, Grain Free Paleo

Bit inspired by a few of our members and limitations I decided to combo and modify a few recipes to make this one without garlic, or onion in the base cakes. 3 6oz cans Salmon drained, crumbled
2 tbsp Fresh Dill minced fine (6 grams)
4 Eggs whisked (Room Temperature)
1/4 cup (28g) Coconut Flour
1/4 cup (20g) shredded Unsweetened Shredded Coconut
1/2 tsp Baking Powder
1/4 cup (60g) Unrefined Coconut oil (Melted)
Black Pepper and Salt to taste (I omit salt) 2 tbsp coconut oil to fry them in 1. Whisk together your coconut flour, baking powder, shredded coconut, black pepper salt,
2. In another bowl mix your whisked eggs, coconut oil, salmon, and dill combining thoroughly with your hands or a spatula
3. Combine both bowls and mix well working like a meat loaf by hand.
4. Put in the fridge to set up for 30-60 mins,
5. Form into patties cooking 1-2 mins each side on medium heat adding more oil as needed between batches. These pair well with ranch, ketchup, or dill sauce. I can provide recipes for sauces if needed

Ennis_TX

Ennis_TX

Tender Moist Cilantro Lime Pork Chops

NOTE on this recipe you can change the cilantro, lime, garlic, for any simmering sauce base, BBQ, teriyaki, harissa etc. 1/2 cup or so worth. Cilantro Lime Pork Chops Pork Chops a lean and finicky meat, being lean they dry out easy. This cooking method of searing then oven baking, followed by simmering in sauce, helps keep them moist. 4-5 boneless pork chops thin
1 tbsp oil for the pan
1/2 cup chopped cilantro
2 large limes (zest and juice)
2 minced garlic cloves
2tbsp butter flavored coconut oil (Nutiva)
Cast iron skillet 1. Preheat oven to 400
2. Oil pan and cook the chops 1min each side over medium heat til lightly browned. Transfer to plate to sit.
3. In a small food processor pulse the, cilantro, oil, garlic, lime zest, juice.
4. Place pork chops back in the skillet and place in the oven for 6-7 mins (tip sheet of foil loose over top for splatter reduction.
5. Move skillet to stove pour in cilantro sauce, setting juices and stir around over medium heat for about a min or two. Pairs well with salsa, guacamole, salads.

Ennis_TX

Ennis_TX

 

Olive Oil, Celiac, Sales, Life

Well I made a amazing discovery about my olive allergy....its not olives.
I got some olive oil on 2 occasions in the past year, that upon putting it on my finger and licking it my mouth goes numb and my cheeks, tongue and throat swell followed by vomiting.
I have had some vegan cheese, and some sauces with "olive oil" that doe not do this.
I recently got some really high end olive oil with truffle oils in it.....no reaction, I can swish it even and NO reaction.....I think they are cutting the cheaper olive oiles with like some form for corn or other oil? Odd as corn normally forms blood blisters or a rash....wondering if different chains in the oil protein wise? Maybe something else? Who knows.

I must admit sales suck recently, NO baked goods sold in 2 weeks. My catering has died down, heck we had to THROW away ribeyes this week because no one would order them even on special discounts. Artisan blends of almond butters have cut back, seems the only thing selling is our vegan ice cream at least to some degree.
I DO have big money jobs booked for later in the year.....but for now I am struggling to get by.

I have been trying to get my dad a motorcycle for his birthday coming up, being broke and no income, I decided to sell some assets. I have 2 guns that I had gotten 1 as a gift and one to go hunting with my dad (he no longer can). I have had the worst luck trying to sell them or trade them.......even listing $300 below msrp.


OH and I no longer will tell people "I have Celiac Disease" when describing why I am gluten free or why I sell gluten free baked goods. I found the term "Disease" kills the whole subject. Instead I tell people "I have have a GENETIC CONDITION, that will not let me eat wheat or gluten" and my immune system reacts to it attacking my organs. This seems to smooth over better then a "Disease" which scares off people

Ennis_TX

Ennis_TX

 

Grain Free Breading

Some people ask what I use for breading that is gluten and grain free. Here are my top 3 Chip Breading
Simple, preseasoned,
1bag of chips (I use https://eatprotes.com/products/chips as they are low carb the Zesty Nacho, BBQ, Chili & Lime and even the Toasted Coconut all have their own niche in breading foods)
1 cup Coconut Flour
4 eggs
2 cup almond or coconut milk
Meat, shrimp, Or even Vegan cheese cut into sticks
4 Bowls/bowl plates for the line 1. Put your chips in a food processor and pules til crumbed Put this in a bowl
2. Now prep your other bowls 1 with whisked eggs, 1 with the coconut flour, 1 with the milk,
3. Dip the item to be breaded in the milk, then dredge in the coconut flour, dip in eggs, then roll in the crumbed chips
4. Cook either deep fry, air fry, or bake in a oven to crisp/cook. (Oven 400-425F 15-20mins depending on item)
5. BONUS when done combine the leftovers from the bowls add in some some more milk if you need....you got hush puppies that are great fried in a bit of coconut oil. Heavy Coconut breading (Fryer/Deep skillet and refined coconut oil fry)
This is perfect for cutting chicken into nuggets, fish nuggets, shrimp etc. Small pieces
4 eggs
5 tbsp (35g) coconut flour
1/2 tsp baking powder
salt&Pepper to taste
2 tsp seasoning of choice (try http://bigaxespice.com/shop.html here, choose the blend for your dish)
1 cup unsweetened shredded coconut (This can be skipped and just use the batter, I like the extra through with seafood)
2 bowls 1. Heat your oil to 325F
2. Whisk your eggs in a bowl
3. Now add in your coconut flour, baking powder, seasoning, salt & pepper, mix until smooth
4. In another bowl put your coconut flakes
5. Dip your food in the batter and mold it onto the item, roll in optional coconut flakes. dropping into the oil after
6. Flip once when the underside is golden, most foods will float up when done. I found these store bought nut based breading crumbs by https://nutcrumbs.com/collections/all that work great with everything. Choose your flavor and go,
You take
2 eggs
1/4cup of almond milk"
1-2 cups of the crumbs 1. Mix your eggs and milk in one bowl, and dump the crumbs in another
2. Dip your prepared meat, veggies (cauliflower, zucchini etc) in the egg mix then dredge in the crumbs
3. Cook how ever you want, baked, fried, etc use like you would in any recipe you have for gluten breading or panko.

Ennis_TX

Ennis_TX

Jambalaya

Here is a nice flavorful Jambalaya from my Paleo based catering, 1 tablespoon oil
1 chopped onion
1 chopped red bell pepper
1 tablespoon minced garlic
12 ounces andouille sausage, sliced (Aidells is Gluten Free and found in most walmarts) 2 package Miracle Rice
1 tablespoon Cajun seasoning like Big Axe Spice No Salt Black'N Jack
1 teaspoon paprika
1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 teaspoon dried oregano
1/2 teaspoon onion powder
1/2 teaspoon dried thyme 3-4 cups Pacific Chicken Bone Broth
1 tablespoon tomato paste
1 (14.5-ounce) can no salt-added diced tomatoes, undrained 3/4 pound peeled and deveined medium shrimp 2 (Frozen pre cooked works great, or 12oz of Canned Crab or chopped up surumi)
2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley to finish (Optional) 1. Prepare and pan dry the Miracle rice as instruction set aside in a bowl
2. Add the first 5 ingredients and stir cooking til vegetables are tender 5-7mins
3. Add in the Miracle rice, paprika, pepper, oregano, thyme, onion and garlic powder stir well cook another 2 mins
4. Then pour in the chicken broth, water, tomato paste, can of tomatoes stir well. Bring to boil, cover and reduce to low heat and simmer for 20mins
5. Add in your Shrimp/Crab, and Cajun Seasoning stir in and cover for another 5mins(I found I could sub a can of crab meat, or surumi)
6. Remove from heat let stand for another 5-10 mins then stir in the parsley and serve. Extra 25% off your first order with Thrive Market http://thrv.me/gf25
https://thrivemarket.com/p/miracle-noodle-shirataki-rice
https://thrivemarket.com/p/pacific-foods-chicken-bone-broth
https://thrivemarket.com/p/brother-bru-brus-african-hot-pepper-sauce-very-hot
http://bigaxespice.com/shop.html

Ennis_TX

Ennis_TX

 

Almond Butter Fudge

Another almond Butter recipe, Almond Butter Fudge 1 cup (240g) Almond Butter (The 8oz tub of my Artisan Blends works great for this) 1 cup (240g, Coconut Oil 1/4 cup (60g) Coconut milk (Canned) 1 tsp Vanilla or extract of choice Stevia to taste, or a bit of maple syrup (Lakanto Sugar free can work)     1. Melt Almond Butter and coconut oil together 2. In a food processor or blender mix everything together. 3. Pour into muffin tins, or baking pan and refrigerate for 2-3 hours for it to set.

Ennis_TX

Ennis_TX

  • Recent Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    No Gluten-Free Diet for Tennis Champion Roger Federer
    Celiac.com 09/18/2018 - With a number of major tennis stars singing the praises of a gluten-free diet, including top players like Novak Djokovic, Swiss great Roger Federer weighed in on the topic.
    The 20-time Grand Slam winner says that he’s never tried the gluten-free diet, and that he doesn’t not “even know what that all means…I eat healthy, and I think that's what people should do, too, if they have the options. It's sure important the right diet for an athlete.”
    Djokovic, the 2018 US Open winner has been gluten-free since 2011, and calls the diet his biggest key to his success.
    For Federer, diet is helpful, but not the whole story. “[Diet] can help you, you know. I mean, I think every athlete should be in good shape. I don't think we should have any fat athletes, to be honest. We do too much sports and we should be too professional to let that happen to ourselves.
    If it happens, well, we should wake up. You don't have the right entourage. They're not telling you that you're a bit fat. Players try different things, and whatever works for them. I do my thing. It's been very easy and natural and healthy, and it's worked.”
    So, while Novak Djokovic, and a number of other athletes, have gone gluten-free and continue to tout the benefits, look for Federer to remain faithful to his generally nutritious non-gluten-free diet.
    Read more at: TennisWorldUSA.org

    Connie Sarros
    All About Eggplant
    Celiac.com 09/15/2018 - People have a love/hate relationship with the purple fruit called ‘eggplant’. Eggplants, first cultivated in southern India and Sri Lanka, are also known as aubergine, Guinea squash, melazana, and ‘poor-man’s caviar’. Like potatoes they are members of the nightshade family, and despite the fact that we all consider eggplant to be a vegetable, biologically it is defined as a berry, and therefore it is a fruit.
    When selecting the fruit, select ones that are firm to the touch, have a smooth and shiny skin and are heavy. Avoid those with brown or soft spots and have a dull color. Gently push with your thumb or forefinger. If the flesh gives slightly but then bounces back, it is ripe. If the indentation remains, it is overripe and the insides will be mushy. If there is no give at all, the eggplant was picked too early. Once you bring it home, avoid placing it near tomatoes and apples, as they give off a gas that quickens the ripening process. Try to use the eggplant within two days of purchase.
    There are several cooking hints that will make your ‘eggplant experience’ more tasteful. Do not cook this fruit in an aluminum pan as it may cause discoloration (both of the pan and the fruit!). The skin is edible on small, younger plants, but should be removed on coarser, older ones. Once you cut the eggplant and cook it right away because the flesh will brown (similar to cut bananas). This fruit absorbs oil very easily, so it is recommended that you coat the slices with cornmeal before frying or baking. To help reduce the bitter flavor in older plants, ‘de-gorge’ the eggplant—Slice the eggplant into ½-inch pieces, salt well, then weigh down each slice in a colander to allow the liquid to drain out of the eggplant for 30 minutes—then rinse with cold water and pat dry.
    Equivalents and Nutritional Value—one pound of eggplant equals 3½ cups of diced eggplant and 1¾ cups cooked eggplant. One medium eggplant weights about 1 pound. It contains vitamin C and potassium, has anti-bacterial and diuretic effects, as well as flavanoids (cancer fighting antioxidants). One cup cooked eggplant contains 25 calories.
    The different ways to prepare eggplant are limited only by your imagination. Cut it into matchsticks to add to a stir-fry. Cube it for vegetable stews (Ratatouille). Shred it to make fritters, or puree it for a hummus-style dip. You can also slice it lengthwise and grill it.
    This fruit is probably most famous for the Italian rendition of Eggplant Parmigiana. But the Greeks have taken this dish one step further, ‘Moussaka’. If you have never eaten this, it is a delight to savor. Lean ground beef may be substituted for the ground lamb. Three zucchini may be used in place of the eggplant (if you prefer). Even if you hate eggplant, you will love Moussaka.
    The beauty of Moussaka is that this casserole may be made in advance, then covered and refrigerated overnight, or covered with foil and frozen—before you bake it (thaw in the refrigerator completely before baking). Time is precious for us all, and this concoction does take some time to assemble, but every moment is worth it. This makes an impressive side dish for company, it is perfect for a buffet table, or it can be used as a main dish for a family dinner.
    The following recipe is from my “Wheat-free Gluten-free Reduced Calorie Cookbook”. Traditional Moussaka is ‘loaded’ with calories and fat and cholesterol. This version is lower in calories and fat without sacrificing any of the delicious taste.
    Moussaka (Greek Casserole Dinner)
    Ingredients:
    1 large eggplant, peeled 2 teaspoons olive oil 1 large onion, chopped ½ pound lean ground lamb 5 teaspoons tomato paste ¼ cup white wine ¼ cup chopped fresh parsley 1/8 teaspoon cinnamon 18 teaspoon salt 1/8 teaspoon pepper 1 tablespoon margarine 1 ½ tablespoon cornstarch 1 cup scalded 1% milk 1 egg beaten until frothy 1/8 teaspoon nutmeg ½ cup gluten-free lowfat cottage cheese 1/3 cup gluten-free corn muffin crumbs, dried 1/3 cup Parmesan cheese, shredded Directions:
    Preheat broiler. Cut the peeled eggplant lengthwise into ½-inch thick slices. Spray both sides of the slices with gluten-free nonstick spray; set on a broiler pan and broil until browned, turning once. Preheat oven to 350F. Heat olive oil in a skillet; add onion and sauté until lightly browned. Add the lamb and cook, breaking meat up with a fork, for 10 minutes or until the meat is browned. In a small bowl, stir together the tomato paste, wine, parsley, cinnamon, salt and pepper; add to the meat and simmer, stirring frequently, until all liquid has been absorbed. Remove from heat. Melt the margarine in a medium-size saucepan; blend in the cornstarch with a whisk. Slowly stir the hot milk into the cornstarch; cook over medium heat, stirring constantly, until thickened. Cool slightly, and then stir in the beaten egg, nutmeg, and cottage cheese. Spray a 9-inch square pan with gluten-free nonstick spray. Sprinkle the bottom lightly with 2 tablespoons of the corn muffin crumbs. Arrange alternate layers of eggplant slices and meat mixture in the pan. Sprinkle each meat layer with the Parmesan cheese and remaining corn muffin crumbs. Pour the cottage cheese mixture over the top. Bake 45 minutes or until the top is golden. Cool slightly before cutting. Makes 6 (4 ½ X3-inch) serving.

    Jefferson Adams
    Nima Labs Claps Back at Gluten Free Watchdog Over Gluten Sensor Data
    Celiac.com 09/14/2018 - Celiac.com was all set to do a story on the latest peer-reviewed data on the Nima gluten testing device, when along comes Gluten-Free Watchdog with another of their famous non-recommendations. Gluten-Free Watchdog says they cannot recommend the Nima gluten test kit because of alleged flaws.
    But what does the science say? The latest Nima article and Gluten-Free Watchdog’s complaint both focus on the science, so let’s start there.
    Nima makes two different food sensors: one detects gluten, the other detects peanuts. Each sensor comprises a small, handheld electronic device and a cartridge. To test food, consumers place a pea sized amount into the cartridge, place the cartridge inside the sensor, and run the device.  They then receive a smiley face or wheat symbol with "gluten found," depending on whether or not the Nima device detected the allergen.
    Nima reported their original data in a peer-reviewed scientific journal. Among the conclusions: “Compared with reference R5, Nima antibodies (13F6 and 14G11) had 35- and 6.6-fold higher gliadin affinities, respectively. Nima demonstrated device performance using a comprehensive list of foods, assessing detection sensitivity, reproducibility, and cross-reactivity. Nima presented a 99.0% true positive rate, with a 95% confidence interval of 97.8%–100%.”
    Gluten Free Watchdog says that:
    “Based on third party testing data, the Nima Sensor fails to detect gluten at the 20 ppm level over 20 percent of the time. It isn’t until a sample contains a level of gluten at the 40 ppm level, that a gluten found result is received close to 100% of the time.” Gluten Free Watchdog suggests that this is a problem, because:
    “At a level of gluten in a sample from less than 2 ppm up to a level of gluten between 30 ppm and 40 ppm, the result displayed on the Nima Sensor may be either smiley face or gluten found. If a sample is tested with a Nima Sensor and the result is a smiley face, there is no practical way for a consumer to know if the level of gluten in the sample is less than or more than 20 ppm. If a sample is tested with a Nima Sensor and the result is gluten found, there is no practical way for a consumer to know if the level of gluten in the sample is less than or more than 20 ppm. As a result, the data point received from the Nima Sensor for gluten presents major interpretation problems.” Gluten Free Watchdog charges that Nima uses “NOT the scientifically validated Ridascreen Gliadin R5 ELISA Mendez Method from R-Biopharm used by Gluten Free Watchdog.” The fact is that R5 Elisa remains the industry standard for most testing applications. 
    Gluten Free Watchdog closes its warning with a word from their independent expert: According to Adrian Rogers, Senior Research Scientist at Romer Labs, “It could be argued that the device is not fit for purpose as the company states that there is a clear differentiation between safe and unsafe products based on a 20 ppm level which the validation data does not corroborate.”
    It’s worth noting that for all his accomplishments, Rogers is neither a doctor, nor a PhD. Rogers' LinkdIn page lists his education as: Bsc (Hons), Microbiology, University of Wales, Aberystwyth. A Bachelor of Science degree may not necessarily make an expert in this subject, yet he is presented as one.
    Rogers also seems to have a potential conflict of interest that was omitted in Thompson’s press release. Directly from Rogers’ LinkdIn site:
    “Romer Labs®, Inc. developed an immunochromatographic lateral flow assay for the qualitative detection of gluten in raw ingredients, processed foods, finished food products, and environmental surfaces, using the G12 antibody developed by Belén Morón. The G12 antibody targets a 33-mer peptide which is resistant to enzymatic digestion and heat denaturation, as well as being the fragment of the gliadin protein to which celiac disease sufferers react, making it a reliable analytical marker.” The company Rogers works for, Romer Labs, makes its own gluten testing kits. It seems a bit disingenuous for Gluten Free Watchdog to use a spokesperson from a potentially competing company to try to counteract a peer-reviewed scientific publication for a device which is made by a potential competitor.
    Nima’s Scientific Advisory Board includes some of the most highly respected celiac disease researchers and scientists in the world. They include: Peter HR Green, MD Phyllis and Ivan Seidenberg Professor of Medicine. Director, Celiac Disease Center at Columbia University; Jody Puglisi, PhD Stanford University Professor of Structural Biology; Lucille Beseler, MS, RDN, LDN, CDE, FAND Family Nutrition Center of South Florida; Benjamin Lebwohl, MD, MS Director of Clinical Research Celiac Disease Center at Columbia University; John Garber, MD Gastroenterology, Mass General; and Thanai Pongdee, MD Consultant, Division of Allergic Diseases, Mayo Clinic.
    Nima says that Gluten Free Watchdog’s view of their recently published validation is incomplete and misleading. Nima wrote:
    “All the studies show Nima is highly sensitive across a range of both low and high levels of gluten." "The Nima third party data accurately reported gluten found at 20 ppm and above between 93.3% for food as prepared (a food item that is spiked with an intended quantity of gluten) and 97.2% for food as quantified by an ELISA lab kit (used to determine the exact ppm of gluten in the food)." "The Nima peer reviewed study published in the Food Chemistry Journal reported gluten found at 20 ppm and above at 96.9% accuracy." The statement that:
    “'Nima will fail to detect gluten at 20 ppm 20% of the time' is almost entirely driven by 1 specific food out of 13 tested. That sample, when quantified, was actually below 20 ppm." "In real life, people get glutened at many different ppm levels, not just 20 ppm. Nima has been shown to detect gluten at levels below, at and above 20 ppm across a variety of foods in a number of studies.” Reading the peer reviewed data provided by Nima, and reading Gluten Free Watchdog’s complaints, it becomes clear that Gluten Free Watchdog’s complaints sound serious and authoritative, but ring a bit hollow. 
    Consider the Following Analogy
    Imagine a gluten-sniffing dog that performed as well as Nima in scientific trials; same performance, same exact data. 
    You can give this dog a sniff, or a small bite of food, and he can signal you if the food’s got gluten in it with 97% accuracy at 20ppm or below. Nearly 100% accuracy at 40ppm or above (as stated by Gluten Free Watchdog).
    People would think that the dog was not only cute and fluffy, but wonderfully helpful and everyone would love it, and everyone with celiac disease would want one. And it would be a great big gushing warm and fuzzy feel-good story. Pretty much no one would be arguing that the dog was potentially dangerous, or somehow unfit for people with celiac disease. Such dogs would also be far more expensive to own and maintain than the Nima device. Apparently such dogs can cost upwards of $16,000, not including the cost of food, vet bills, etc.
    So, what’s the accuracy rate of a gluten-sniffing dog, anyway? From Mercola.com: Willow, a German shorthaired pointer, is another gluten-sniffing dog, in this case living in Michigan. Her owner, Dawn Scheu, says she can detect gluten with 95 percent to 98 percent accuracy. She worked with a trainer (the same one who trained Zeus) to teach her own dog to detect gluten, with excellent results.
    Gluten-sniffing dogs may detect gluten in amounts as small as .0025 parts per million with 95 percent to 98 percent accuracy. So, will Gluten Free Watchdog be warning against gluten-sniffing dogs anytime soon?
    Somehow, because Nima is a mechanical device made by a company, it's not so warm and fuzzy, not so feel-good. Maybe Nima needs to shape their device like a cute little doggy, or a Pez candy dispenser?
    But the data remains, as does the fact, whatever its drawbacks, anything that detects gluten like Nima does, as well as it does, is potentially very helpful for celiac disease in numerous situations. And it is extremely unlikely to do them any harm.
    Nima seems very much committed to transparency, scientific excellence, and continual product improvement. These are noble goals and generally a win for people with celiac disease. Think of it, just ten years ago, a portable gluten-sensor with the kind of accuracy Nima is reliably achieving would have been the stuff of fantasy. Yet here it is. More accurate than any gluten-sniffing dog, and for a couple hundred bucks. People with celiac disease are living in a very different world than just a few years ago.
    Nima did not have to publish its data, but it chose to do so, and in a reputable, peer-reviewed scientific journal. Nima conducted its research using solid scientific standards, and reported those results publicly. They explained their methodology and results, they acknowledged product limitations and expressed a commitment to improvement. How is this remotely controversial?
    The celiac disease community is fortunate to have companies committed to investing time and money into products and devices that help to improve the lives of people with celiac disease. We feel strongly that the perfect should not be the enemy of the good. Devices like the Nima gluten sensor can be helpful for numerous people with celiac disease.  
    Disclosure: Nima is a paid advertiser on Celiac.com. Celiac.com's advertisers do not influence our editorial content. 
    Read Nima’s full report on test data at: Food Chemistry.com Read Gluten Free Watchdog’s Statement on the Nima device at: Glutenfreewatchdog.org Read Nima’s Reply to Gluten Free Watchdog at: Nimasensor.com

    Edward R. Arnold
    To HAIT and Back: The Musings of a Thyroid Patient on the Vagaries of Medical Diagnosis and Treatment in America
    Celiac.com 09/14/2018 - If it is really true that nobody really wants to see a grown man cry, then certainly nobody would have wanted to hang around me near the onset of a long illness whose mystery would take 14 years to solve.
    It began subtly and mildly in 1989, my 43rd year. I had just finished a long and exhausting malpractice suit on behalf of my daughter, an attractive, genetically-normal child who had contracted quadriplegic cerebral palsy in a completely avoidable incident of post-natal asphyxia which had radically changed the nature of life for my spouse and I. By the time 1989 rolled around, I was thoroughly exhausted and carrying a toxic load of anger directed at an incompetent member of the medical profession who had never learned the importance of state-of-the-art skills in a profession that literally has the power of life, death, and disability.
    From late 1989 on through 1990, I experienced strange episodes of profound sadness, usually of one to two hours duration, that became increasingly disruptive to my ability to handle a job and child-care duties. Initially, these episodes seemed to come from nowhere. Later on, I found that playing certain pieces of music of which I was fond, would send me into such intense sobbing that I would be forced to pull over if this occurred while driving.
    By the time 1991 rolled around, something was to be added to these periodic bouts of intense sadness. Early in that year, my daughter became very ill, keeping both my spouse and I awake at night for weeks on end. By the time the problem was diagnosed to be a dental infection and dental surgery was done, I had begun to have a sensation of “hollowness”, as though I really weren’t part of this world, most of the time. In late summer of that year, a series of events in which my subconscious had informed me that a friend had a serious illness, sent me into a final “dive”: I simply stopped sleeping more than about two hours per night. When I first stopped sleeping, I soon noticed that even low-level use of alcoholic beverages would further interrupt sleep and throw me into a state in which I couldn’t think of anything but how terrible I felt. This state of pronounced alcohol intolerance would continue for 14 years.
    The final blow came in November 1991, when I went into a completely disabling panic/anxiety attack that sent me to bed, cowering. I had no alternative but to seek treatment from the psychiatric profession. Unfortunately, the first two psychiatrists prescribed drugs which either had no effects, or had effects that seemed worse than the problem they were supposed to solve. The third psychiatrist, whom I stuck with for about six months, came up with a treatment plan that was partially effective (but certainly not restorative). I stayed with this psychiatrist until it became clear that his treatment was equivalent to Jefferson Airplane singing “one pill makes you larger, and one pill makes you small”. I was being jacked up every morning by a toxic, activating SSRI anti-depressant so I could semi-function, and then dropped by benzodiazepenes every night into a non-restorative twilight sleep state.
    In retrospect, the most amazing thing about these first three psychiatrists was that not one of them ordered any tests of my endocrine function. Treatment consisted solely of a series of benzodiazepenes, anti-depressants, mood stabilizers, and anti-psychotics, administered in a trial-and-error fashion that yanked my psyche and body chemistry around like a manic pit bull on a two-foot leash.
    Throughout the latter part of 1992, I transitioned to care with my primary-care physician, mostly because I trusted him more than any of the psychiatrists I had seen up to that time. He was able to stabilize me with one of the old tri-cyclic anti-depressants, doxepin, along with low doses of valium. Although doxepin packs a big morning hangover for many who use it, and has very strong anti-cholinergic effects, its ability to put me out at night helped me function satisfactorily for much of the 1990s, even at doses as low as 10mg, once daily in the evening.
    In 1993 I consulted a highly-recommended psychiatrist, who was the first psychiatrist who actually looked at my thyroid function. When my TSH was measured at 3.5, without also checking my FT3 and FT4, that doctor concluded that thyroid was not my problem. Of course, standards of thyroid diagnosis and treatment have changed radically in the 12 years since. Under the new AACE guidelines, a TSH of 3.5 would now be suspect, because studies of patients with TSH over 3.0 have shown that most progress to hypothyroidism (i.e., TSH greater than 5.5). The new AACE guidelines would mean that further testing and evaluation should be done.
    Until the fall of 1997, I continued treatment with doxepin and intermittent valium, adding the practice of meditation to help calm myself. At that time, I came back to my primary-care physician with the symptom of profound exhaustion on top of the symptoms of insomnia, anxiety, and depression I had suffered for years. Fortunately, my GP was suspicious of thyroid function, and found that my TSH was floating above 8. Since this was well above the old/traditional limit of 5.5, he was ready to start treatment, with (as would be expected of most GPs) T4-only replacement.
    I began taking thyroxine (T4) shortly thereafter with high hopes. Initially, the treatment was successful: getting the added thyroxine into my system caused an immediate improvement in quality of sleep.
    However, the use of T4 did not turn out to be an unqualified success. After use of T4 for about a month, it was apparent that use of thyroxine alone did not produce a full recovery—I still suffered from anxiety, which the medication seemed to be increasing.
    In the meantime, hair loss became an issue. Several years earlier, I had noticed that running my fingers through my hair would produce an unpleasant sensation, almost as though the hair roots were tender. By the time of my 50th birthday, in 1996, I had noticed that my pillow was virtually coated with hair by the time I would remove it for washing. Unfortunately, nobody, including my GP, reminded me that hair loss is a prime symptom of hypothyroidism; and, like most males, I was ready to assume it was plain old male pattern baldness. By the time I was treated correctly and the hair loss stopped, I had pronounced thinning on the crown which was too advanced to be reversed in response to the treatment of the thyroid problem.
    In about 1998, I began experimentation with amino acids which was to last for almost seven years. I found that use of tryptopan, 5-HTP, and GABA could reduce (but not correct) the worst of my symptoms. In retrospect, though, use of amino acids is a poor substitute for a well-functioning thyroid, as well as being expensive and inconvenient.
    By the summer of 1999, I had reached a paradoxical situation. Experimentation had shown that my body needed on the order of 100 micrograms of thyroxine (T4) to keep my TSH down to a reasonable level; yet taking that much T4 was causing intense anxiety, requiring me to use strong sleeping medications. By late summer 1999, I had noticed another distressing symptom—my acute sense of hearing was being increasingly impacted by tinnitus. Evidently, the root cause that drove me into hypothyroidism, could also impact hearing.
    It was soon after a household move in the spring of 2000, that I had a partially-disabling attack of severe epicondylitis (more commonly known as tennis elbow). It was obvious that my body was no longer able to handle the short-term stresses of the hard physical work required by a move. This obvious physical symptom, accompanied by increasing periodontal issues and continuing mental issues, prompted me to seek other treatment.
    In September 2000, I began seeing a prominent “metabolic” doctor (M.D.) who is well known for his treatment of the metabolic disorders of diabetics. This doctor has written a number of books related to dietary changes and supplements needed to stave off metabolic degeneration as one ages. I was switched to Armour thyroid, and began treatment with other hormones (primarily hydrocortisone in low doses to supplement adrenal function, and pregnenolone). I took an enormous range of nutritional supplements recommended by this doctor, and also made radical changes in diet, which I maintained for nearly two years. Unfortunately, nothing seemed to really work—I did not obtain substantial relief of my symptoms. A thyroid test in Sep 2001 still showed unsatisfactory results—my TSH was 4.7, and my FT3 was below the bottom of the normal range.
    By the spring of 2002, I had decided I would have to take my care elsewhere if there were to be progress. After doing a brief telephone consult with a naturopath outside my home state, I began seeing a naturopath in my home town for whom I had obtained very positive recommendations via a web search. By March 2002, the naturopath had informed me that testing showed my hypothyroidism was due to anti-thyroid antibodies, i.e., my body was attacking its own thyroid gland. This condition is officially known as Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis (HAIT—as I now know, HAIT is the leading cause of hypothyroidism). I found this discovery quite amazing; how come the three endocrinologists I had seen between 1998 and 2002, had not given me this information? I was started on Thyrolar (synthetic combination T3/T4) by the naturopath, because she said that my body’s ability to make T3 may have been compromised by HAIT.
    Soon after beginning to see the naturopath, I learned that Dr. Stephen Langer of Berkeley, CA might have additional information on the problem I had been having with thyroid hormone causing anxiety in a hypothyroid patient. I had searched for information about this syndrome in a number of places but found nothing; for instance, the well-known book “Thyroid Solution”, by Ridha Arem M.D., contains no information on the condition. So, I consulted with Dr. Langer and learned that a small percentage of people with Hashimoto’s are exquisitely sensitive to even low doses of Thyrolar. In fact, the condition is rare enough that virtually no GPs, and only a few endocrinologists, know of its existence. Apparently, it does not have an official name attached to it. I decided to refer to it as “HAIT anxiety syndrome”, although there are a few doctors who prefer to refer to any neurological symptoms accompanying HAIT as “Hashimoto’s Encephalopathy”.
    I began to feel a little better between March 2002 and June 2003. I’m not sure why the message about gluten grains had not penetrated before, but by June 2003, the naturopath reminded me again that she had seen a positive result to a test for antibodies to gliadin (one of the two major proteins in gluten grains) in 2002, and that I really should consider removing gluten grains from my diet. This recommendation was based on three factors:
    I had antibodies to the protein gliadin found in wheat and other gluten grains such as rye and barley; I had anti-thyroid antibodies which were over the threshold that defines HAIT; Medicine really is an experimental science, and this experiment, in spite of its inconvenience, appeared to be worth a try. In a numbers sense, the response of my anti-thyroid antibodies to the removal of gluten grains from my diet was slow, but gratifying. My thyroperox test started off at 25, dropped to 19 within 6 months, 7 within 10 months, and became zero in less than 2 years. I eventually concluded that the removal of gluten grains from my diet was not all that difficult, partly because I wasn’t a celiac who had to worry about that last 1%. I also concluded that removal of gluten would have a positive health effect in terms of the reduced glycemic index of the foods I consumed.
    My symptomatic improvement thereafter was not immediate. It soon became obvious that T3/T4 treatment is not an exact science, and the proportion of T3 to T4 needs to be closer to the human body’s need, not the pig’s need (Both Armour and Thyrolar have the T3/T4 ratio of one part T3 for every four parts T4, typical of the pig’s biochemistry). For instance, in late 2003, my TSH had dropped very low, i.e. I had become clinically hyperthyroid due to excess T3 as revealed by a free T3 test. I have since gone through a couple more of these “yo-yo” episodes while being treated, which is a not uncommon event—thyroid treatment is as much art as science.
    Cost of treatment also became a problem. By June 2004, I began seeing a highly-recommended Physician’s Assistant (P.A.), who was known locally to be very good at thyroid treatment, and whose clinic would accept my health insurance. I continued to see the naturopath, although at less frequent intervals, since my insurance (like most) would pay nothing for naturopathy. The P.A. and the naturopath did not completely agree on treatment methods, particularly the use of adrenal supplements (hydrocortisone and DHEA in low/biologic doses) along with thyroid supplements; but they were both in agreement that I should continue to pursue combination T3/T4 therapy. So, I blended recommendations from the two for awhile, transitioning to T3 and T4 in separate tablets of Cytomel and Synthroid, so the percentage of T3 could be altered.
    I gradually transitioned off adrenal supplements during 2005, and very gradually increased my T3/T4 supplementation over the course of the year. Finally, by September 2005, I began to realize that I truly had recovered my health—I had episodes of feeling really good again! Still, my sleep was not perfect—I had discovered what Ridha Arem M.D. has documented in the book Thyroid Solution: a return to the euthyroid state may not immediately eliminate all symptoms. After going to a small dose of the atypical anti-depressant mirtazapine, I finally could feel, every day, like I had in my 30s. Unfortunately, it had taken an agonizing 14 years to get there.
    Today, I religiously take my 10 micrograms T3, and 75 micrograms T4, split into two doses each day. I also religiously avoid all traces of gluten grains in my diet because I now understand that the gluey, hard-to-digest proteins in them are a substance which can cause major metabolic disruption. Like the co-author of the book “Dangerous Grains”, Ron Hoggan, with whom I have corresponded, I have come to realize that our society’s over-use of a potentially toxic substance isn’t just dangerous to the 1 in 133 people who have full-blown celiac disease—it can cause a very poor quality of life for the approximately 1 in 5 who have gluten intolerance. I have also come to the realization that, to those few who are unlucky enough to encounter the HAIT Anxiety Syndrome, you may require combination T3/T4 therapy to feel better; and, you may never feel as well as you did when you were young, unless you find a way to stop your immune system from waging war on your thyroid.
    Most of all, 14 years after it started, I feel as though a significant part of my life has been taken from me. I was unable get joy or pleasure from life, I was unable to work effectively, and I was unable to be the kind of parent I could have been between my 45th and 59th years of life.
    I never imagine that I would be looking forward to the relatively advanced age of 60. However, given that I now feel better than I did at anytime between the ages of 43 and 59, 60 looks like a good place to be.
    Summary:
    In retrospect, the most important things I ended up learning from 14 years of very unpleasant experience are:
    If you have psychiatric symptoms, e.g., depression, anxiety, panic disorder, etc., make sure your endocrine system is evaluated, with thyroid testing as the cornerstone. Beware of doctors who offer an antidepressant first thing, without endocrine evaluation. The emotional/psychiatric effects of hypothyroidism are just as important, and just as damaging, as the physical ones. Unfortunately, many MD’s focus on the physical. If you want to get well, you have to apply all your skills and intelligence to investigating your problem, which most MD’s may not understand. You may also have to turn to “alternative” practitioners. If your TSH is above 3.0, or maybe even 2.5, and your doctor will not do more comprehensive testing (e.g. FT3/FT4), and/or try a test run of thyroid supplementation, find another doctor. If your doctor diagnoses you as hypothyroid, demand that a test for anti-thyroid antibodies be done. If you have any antibodies, even if they are under the threshold where HAIT is considered to start, get testing for allergy to foods, and testing for allergy to common environmental toxins if food testing reveals nothing. You may find, as did I, that you won’t feel as well as possible until you free your body from antibodies.

    Jefferson Adams
    Lawsuit Claims Bob’s Red Mill Ignores RoundUp Pesticide in its Oat Products
    Celiac.com 09/13/2018 - Bob’s Red Mill finds itself under fire by two women who claim the company knowingly hides the presence of an allegedly cancer-causing weed killer in its steel cut oat and rolled oat products, and falsely advertises those products as healthy. 
    Tamara Frankel and Natasha Paracha filed a federal class action in San Francisco, alleging that parent company Bob’s Red Mill Natural Foods knows that its oat products contain or likely contain glyphosate, but fails to disclose it on the label. The women cite a recent report by the Environmental Working Group, an environmental research and advocacy group, which claimed to find traces of controversial herbicide glyphosate in Cheerios, Quaker Oats and other oat-based breakfast foods. The women contend that Bob’s uses labels such as “gluten free,” “wheat free” and “purity tested,” which lead consumers to falsely believe them to be healthy.
    Both U.S. and European regulators have concluded that glyphosate is safe, while that World Health Organization’s International Agency for Research on Cancer classifies it as a probable human carcinogen.
    Bayer subsidiary Monsanto, maker of the glyphosate-based herbicide Roundup has faced numerous lawsuits over its product.  A San Francisco jury recently found that exposure to Roundup caused the cancer of a school groundskeeper, and awarded him $289 million in damages. Shortly after that verdict, the Environmental Working Group released a report claiming that 31 of 45 oat-based food samples tested positive for glyphosate, and that levels exceeded safety limits of 160 parts per billion.
    EWG applies a more stringent standard than the 2 mg/kg/day of glyphosate standard used by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the 1.1 mg per day standard used by the State of California.
    Frankel and Paracha are represented by Patricia Syverson of the San Diego law firm Bonnett, Fairbourn, Friedman & Balint.
    Stay tuned for more developments on this and related stories.

  • Blog Entries

  • Blog Statistics

    • Total Blogs
      1,144
    • Total Entries
      1,971
  • Who's Online (See full list)

  • Blog Comments

  • Topics

  • Posts

    • Victoria, It can be.  Up to 40% of Celiac's have some Neurologic/Psychriatric issues. Here is the research on the anxiety and depression issues common in celiac's entitled "Neurologic and Psychiatric Manifestations of Celiac Disease and Gluten Sensitivity" https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3641836/ I used to have terrible anxiety (un-natural anxiety) almost to the point of a panic attack. Taking Zinc lozenges (they self regulate) with a metalic taste in your mouth helped many of my anxiety issues. Later (or around the same time I cant remember now) I learned magnesium and B-Vitamins could also help. Taking a B-complex as I think Ennis_tx mentioned (in another thread) and taking Magnesium Citrate helped many of my depression issues. Here is a good article that explains some of the vitamins/minerals that some one can take that can help anxiety and depression issues entitled "The Role of Vitamins and Minerals in Psychiatry" https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3046018/ I hope this is helpful but it is not medical advice. Low Iron is also common (IDA) in celiac's and has been shown to be associated with panic attacks. Here is the research on low Iron and B-6 entitled "Low serum concentrations of vitamin B6 and iron are related to panic attack and hyperventilation attack" https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23603926 I didn't know any of this then.  But it is not all in your head as doctor's some times are prone to say. The anxiety is real! Again I hope this is helpful and good luck on your continued journey. There is hope I used to be you!  Waking up on the "wrong side" of the bed. . . days in a row never knowing why? At least you know how gluten is effecting you or are at least right to suspect it and you can avoid it. . . . And sometimes just avoiding the issue once you have identified it is easier than dealing with the after math. And why would you want too anyway? It is not all in your head!  Be your own advocate! Note/Remeber the research was on the "Neurologic and Psychiatric Manifestations of Celiac Disease and Gluten Sensitivity"  which you seem to have.  You don't need to be full blown (officially) diagnosed celiac for gluten to affect you poorly as you are noticing. Again I hope this is helpful but this is not medical advice just some of the things I found helped me.  And if they help you.  Pay it forward and tell others. I wish I knew some of these things years and years ago as many of us do on this forum and why we still participate/share our experiences to help those still looking for answers sadly we had to find out on our own too often! 2 Timothy 2: 7  “Consider what I say; and the Lord give thee understanding in all things” this included Posterboy by the grace of God,
    • Hi Victoria! Consider getting retested for celiac disease provided you are still eating gluten daily.  Children of celiacs should be retested every few years even if they have no obvious symptoms.   https://www.gluten.org/branchnews/relatives-tested-celiac-disease/ https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24552206
×