mewnicorns

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About mewnicorns

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  1. mewnicorns

    Post-diagnosis depression

    I might be able to do that on the weekends or if I know the plans ahead of time. Sometimes plans materialize spontaneously, or on a weekday, which is rough. I'm usually hungry after work, but I definitely don't have time to go home, eat, and come back out to the city. I think this is just going to be one of those things I won't be able to figure out until I figure it out.
  2. mewnicorns

    Post-diagnosis depression

    Thanks! I've actually tried them before but I'm not a huge fan of zoodles and other vegetable noodle dishes. I wish you could buy their ingredients separately because their sauces were really good. I love soba noodles and Banza pasta so I will probably rely on those a lot (though some soba noodles are blended with wheat, so I'll need to find pure buckwheat noodles). I have an appointment with a dietician who specializes in both vegan/vegetarian diets and celiac disease on Tuesday so I am hoping she can help me figure out a grocery list for the first time I go shopping for gluten-free stuff. I just have no idea what to buy because it's not as simple as swapping out all the gluten-containing things I eat for the gluten-free versions. That would be super unhealthy, and not everything has a counterpart. This is going to be really hard but I know I'm going to figure it out because I have to. I'm not happy about it, but I can do it.
  3. That's complicated because I don't really know my extended family. My parents immigrated here in the 70s so my cousins and aunts stayed behind. My uncle passed away either last year or the year before of some kind of liver issue, but he wasn't related to me (he was my mom's sister's husband). My mom has previously been diagnosed with IBS and has been complaining about digestive ailments, fatigue, and general aches and pains for as long as I can remember. However, she does not have thyroid disease. My dad does. I don't know who is more likely to have celiac. They are both getting tested. Not sure if my brother is or not. I think he should since he also inherited thyroid problems, but I think he's too scared to right now (probably my fault for the way I've reacted to the whole thing).
  4. Oh poor thing I'm sorry to hear that. Yes, I know I could definitely have it much worse. I know people who have multiple food allergies and diseases and are practically housebound because they can't eat any food they don't make themselves. I've known people on immunosuppressants that have horrible side effects and make them sick all the time, or who have degenerative diseases. I'm really being overly dramatic. I know logically this is probably not as bad as it feels right now, but I have suffered from severe anxiety in the past and even though I had it under control, this diagnosis seems to have re-triggered it. I certainly hope we see an increase in funding and research. To even have something like a Lactaid for celiacs would be huge. Not necessarily even something that would allow us to eat normally, but something that would at least raise our tolerance so we didn't have to worry about CC. Thats the part that, IMO, makes the diet so tedious and results in so many people failing despite their efforts. Even the U of Chicago website says failure is inevitable. You WILL be glutened. To me this is not acceptable. The GFD is not an acceptable solution in and of itself. It's merely a start.
  5. You are so right. I suffer from a lot of anxiety and tend to always jump to the worst case scenario, especially when it comes to matters of health. Good thing I have a therapy appointment this Friday cuz I need it. I am trying to remind myself that 2/3 is still a majority, and it's good that complete healing is even possible because it isn't in a lot of other AI diseases. It's hard for me to find the trail of links I followed since I'm on a different computer now. I think I started with an NPR article about people who get diagnosed when they're older. I was reading it because I wasn't sure if I have had these disease my whole life or if something triggered it. In that article, there was a sentence that started like "Karen, whose father died of complications from celiac disease..." and I was like WHAT? He DIED of complications from celiac? WTF does that mean? How old was he? Is this normal?! Then went down a rabbit hole and ended up on the Schar website and VeryWell.com. At that point I decided I just needed to step away from the laptop because I was searching for encouraging, consoling information and finding the exact opposite. It was scaring me so much I had to take an Ativan, which I haven't done in years :\
  6. Not sure if this is the right place to ask this question, but no one in my family has been diagnosed with celiac (which I realize does not mean they don't have it), and yet I know it's strongly hereditary. My grandparents all lived to old age and my parents are approaching their 70s. Obviously my grandparents have passed away, so they can't get tested, but I'm wondering if it's possible they lived that long despite being undiagnosed. I'm not asking this question to make any excuses for cheating or anything like that. I am just scared of all the information I'm reading about how celiacs tend to have higher mortality rates. My mom has had lifelong GI issues, and my dad has thyroid disease (although I don't think he has autoimmune thyroid disease). They will be getting tested soon so I'll know more then. For now I'm just wondering...is it possible I'm the unlucky first n my family?
  7. I just read that only 8% of celiacs recover normal intestinal function after 16 months, and only 2/3 after 5 YEARS (despite reportedly feeling better relatively quickly). That leaves 1/3 of celiacs who never fully recover. This includes those who are maintaining a strict gluten-free diet. Those who do not fully recover are more likely to be those who were diagnosed as adults (me), and who had serious damage (also probably me, but I'll find out for sure tomorrow). Those who do not recover are at a much higher risk for going on to develop serious and even fatal illnesses. So we go through this onerous process of hypervigilence around food...only to be partially healed and possibly die of lymphoma or get hit with another debilitating AI disease? Tell me things aren't as bleak as they seem. Edit: Forgot to mention...even the ones who never recover have no clue. They typically feel fine and their blood tests come back normal.
  8. mewnicorns

    Post-diagnosis depression

    I know it seems that way but I don't ever really cook anything very complicated so just getting that nailed down is going to be difficult for me, especially given what a terrible planner I am. I do not have a lot of free time and I have no help. It's going to be a huge adjustment. I figured I'd try to just get the basics nailed down and then worry about how to make things taste good. For me, this is almost like having to forget everything I know about food and completely re-learn how to eat. I'm going to try and see it as an opportunity to try new things and focus on what I can eat and forget about what I can't, but it's going to take some time before I'm there. It also occurred to me that one reason I don't cook much is because I don't have a lot of energy after work. If I start feeling better, though, maybe I will. I really hope that I do. I am, however, happy to hear BM products are gluten-free! I have like 4 bags of chicken strips in my freezer and I was afraid to look at the ingredients. That makes me feel a bit better In the midst of all this craziness, I just got invited to a pizza party :\ It's unlimited pizza for $40/person. I'm obviously not going to be partaking in this, so I guess I'll be saving money at least. Going to see if I can bring my own from one of the gluten-free places.
  9. mewnicorns

    Post-diagnosis depression

    That is extreme, but I bet you have healed well. Thank you <3
  10. mewnicorns

    Post-diagnosis depression

    What a wonderful reference. Thank you! Glad to hear you've been able to make it work for you despite being so restricted. I've never been much of a prepper or planner when it comes to food. I tend to do things very spontaneously and just go by what I feel like eating that day because I get bored easily. This is going to be very difficult for me, but I made an appointment with a dietician next week who can hopefully help me figure it out. I think for now, it might be best to divorce the idea of food from pleasure and only look at it as a tool for survival. Then once I start getting the hang of it, I can start looking into how to make it enjoyable again. It's just all so overwhelming right now.
  11. mewnicorns

    Post-diagnosis depression

    BTW just wanted to throw out a general THANK YOU to everyone who is responding. I appreciate all the support, even if I'm being a bit of a sourpuss right now
  12. mewnicorns

    Post-diagnosis depression

    We have TONS of gluten-free options where I live (seriously, almost everywhere has a gluten-free menu), but the CC issue is very concerning to me. Most of these menus seem to be cashing in on the gullibility of fad dieters more than considering people with actual diseases/intolerances. Often the menu will come with a disclaimer that they can't guarantee that there won't be CC so they don't recommend the menu to celiacs. I think they should just not offer gluten-free items in that case. If you can't guarantee your gluten-free offerings are free of gluten, what's the point?! I love San-J's Szechuan sauce! It's not even remotely authentic but it's tasty at least. I think as a vegetarian I relied a lot on healthy, gluten-containing foods like barley, whole grain breads and pastas, etc. so I literally have no idea how to eat anymore. On top of that, I just read that even naturally gluten-free foods like lentils and pulses are usually contaminated?! It just seems like every time I think I've found a solution, it's not actually safe. I actually haven't been eating these past couple of days because everything I'm reading is making me so paranoid
  13. mewnicorns

    Post-diagnosis depression

    When I say I don't cook, I just mean I tend to be very minimal when I do, not that I only eat frozen dinners or anything. It's going to be a lot harder and more tedious to find convenience items like sauces and condiments now, and when I do find ones that are usable, they may not taste great. I used to buy this low calorie, high protein very thin pizza crust and would just switch out the veggie toppings. It made a very fast and healthy dinner. I can't find anything comparable in a gluten-free version. They're all very calorie-dense and nutrient-light. But making it from scratch is just not sustainable. I had a lot of go-to healthy, quick, low calorie meals in my back pocket that aren't really replaceable in a gluten-free format. I did have Banza pasta not too long ago and I really liked it and planned to continue using it even before I had a clue about my diagnosis. So I'll probably stick to that. I'm not really sure about going for a lot of gluten-free versions of gluteny things yet. They're so much higher in calories and lower in nutritional value :\ I just worked pretty hard to drop 10 lbs and I don't want to gain it all back. It will suck though. But honestly, I also go out to eat a LOT. Probably more than most people do. I live in a city where eating out or ordering delivery is a way of life. No one brings their lunch to work and weekend brunch is a regular occurrence. From that perspective, it seems so anti-social and depressing to just sit in my office and eat a boring sandwich while everyone else on my team heads out to pick something up. Or sip on a glass of water while everyone else is getting orders of pancakes and waffles. But I guess that's just how it's going to be from now on. Anyway, I hope you're right that it gets better but I'm not really seeing that at the moment
  14. mewnicorns

    Post-diagnosis depression

    How do you not get hungry just sitting there and watching everyone else eat and smelling their food while you go without? I work long hours and have a long commute home so I can't just make something at home to eat before I go. Idk, maybe this isn't the right place to ask this question but it sounds torturous to me. It would be nice to have more energy for sure. I did go to the doctor in the past because I was feeling so tired all the time, and every time they would test my iron levels, vitamins, and metabolic panel and everything came back normal. That was really my only symptom. I have depression as well, but it's likely I would have had that anyway due to certain events in my life. This probably didn't help though. It would be nice if it improved, but I am skeptical.
  15. mewnicorns

    Post-diagnosis depression

    Thank you Wow, that is a lot to get hit with, especially as a baker I'm sorry. Is the diabetes related or unrelated? Were you able to put your baking skills to make some good gluten-free/sugar free treats? Much of the problem is that most of the good times I've had with friends and family have revolved around food. I can't think of a single culture or society that evolved to treat food as a simple matter of survival as opposed to a source of community and joy. To not be able to go to someone's house for a dinner party, meet with girlfriends for brunch, go on a first date, or attend a work lunch without anxiety or wondering if you're about to get poisoned seems like a terrible way to live. Not to mention traveling! All these things that are supposed to be a source of relaxation and fun have suddenly become terrifying to me. I can see myself giving up and withdrawing just to avoid thinking about it. That being said, I am lucky that I live in pretty much the best place in the country to be a celiac, so I shouldn't be complaining so much I guess. But despite that, it still feels very lonely. I'm not married or in a relationship, and I don't know anyone else who has this disease, so I really am going through it alone. My ex-bf had it, and if anything, thinking about that just makes it worse. The most well-intentioned people just don't seem to get it. They think it's just giving up bread, beer, and pasta, and that a gluten free menus at restaurants are sufficient.