Jump to content
  • Sign Up

knf

Advanced Members
  • Content Count

    11
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

0 Neutral

About knf

  • Rank
    Contributor
  1. I inadvertantly solved this problem when I went completely grain-free. (Additionally it has helped my health and issues enormously). But, no one tries to make me anything at work anymore! I think people are stunned or confused or overwhelmed by the idea of eating without any grains. Also, most people seem to know someone who is following a paleo diet/lifestyle. So, there has been a very useful intersection of disbelief and understanding - in addition to huge health gains for myself! If you don't want to eliminate all grains, perhaps you could adopt that restriction for your work life. I guarantee no one will try to make you a grain free cake (though it's not that hard!)
  2. The details are different, but this is exactly what I am dealing with lately too. I have also become a huge believer that a leaking gut can change everything up. For me, I think this explains why I am suddenly sensitive to so many things that were ok for the first 10 years of being gluten free. What have people done to successfully heal guts? I know I need to identify and avoid the offending foods. I think probiotics are helping me a lot. I have heard fermented foods can help, but could use some advice there. Without dairy or soy, I don't have the options of yogurt or miso. Anything else I should try?
  3. Shauna, I think I learned more from your post than in several hours of searching the web. Sometimes careful notes just confuse me more! With 50 year old hormones and varying exercise schedules, it can sure get confusing. That's great that you have found a middle ground that works for you. I hope I can do the same.
  4. Thanks. I'll definitely keep the soy test in mind. I am just adding a little bit this week so will watch for any noticeable reactions. Soy was on the panel of 250 foods that I did and came back almost undetectably low. I should have had some exposure since I haven't really avoided soy - just didn't intentionally eat it. I know there has been some in bars and smoothies and soy sauce over the years. I was stunned at the high levels I had for almost all grains and seeds - even rice. Since cutting those out, I feel like a new person. That's why I want to be careful to not overdo the things I am hopefully ok with and am trying to learn about rotating.
  5. I'll add my thoughts to the chorus of those doing better without grains. Overall my energy level has improved, but it has taken significant effort to make that happen. It's been a hard adjustment after so many years of substituting with gluten free grains. But it seems that none of them agree with me anymore. I'm an athlete so have relied heavily on fruit and sweet potatoes - am currently trying to cut back on the fruit for blood sugar reasons more than reactions. No dairy for me and I have to be careful with nuts and peanuts, so rely on coconut pretty heavily for fat. It's an interesting and delicate balance, especially with endurance training.
  6. Thanks. It's great to hear from someone else who has successfully incorporated these ideas. I think I am struggling because I am not really convinced! I know how much better I feel when I avoid my huge list of problem foods, but I don't immediately see the difference in rotating. And it is SO different from how I usually eat (ruts and leftovers!). It is fascinating to me that so many of my trigger foods are things I overeat - so the rotating makes sense. The bean/legume thing has me stumped. I don't eat a lot of beans and have avoided soy because it is such a big problem for so many people. I was surprised to be off the charts with so many beans, but have no indication that soy, lentils, or peanuts are problems. Soy grosses me out! But, I've been experimenting with it for the past few weeks and have no ill effects. In your experience, has strict rotating been more successful than doing it a bit sloppily?
  7. Hi, I am struggling to make sense of new information coming at me rapidly. I am loving feeling good for the first time in years so absolutely certain that I am onto something. But, I could use some quality resources and advice if anyone has similar experiences. I've been gluten-free for almost 10 years - great success until about 2 years ago when it was clear that wasn't enough anymore. I finally broke down and have been paying out of pocket for a naturopath and a lot of testing. Fascinating! I got the new Cyrex panel #4 of 24 foods that commonly show cross reactivity with gluten, and also the leaky gut Cyrex test. As expected, my gut is like a sieve. Somewhat to my surprise, I tested out of measurable range (high) to every single food on the 24 food panel. This includes dairy, most grains (corn, rice, amaranth, spelt, oats, millet, quinoa, and a few others), several seeds (sesame, hemp, flax maybe) and some other interesting foods (potato, cocoa, coffee). I then went and had a full food panel from another lab which showed high response to a bunch of other foods (beans, almonds, eggs, dairy, beef, avocado). So, now I am trying to figure out what to do with all of this information. I am very motivated to give up everything I tested with high reactivity to. But, the more I learn about food rotating and leaky gut, the more I worry about developing new reactions. I suspect some of these foods are problems I gave myself by eliminating gluten (and soy). I tend to get into food ruts. Most of my rut foods I seem to react to now. Furthermore, my options are pretty limited - I feel quite good about sweet potatoes, chicken, fish, coconut, most veggies and fruits. It seems I am currently ok with all nuts except almonds and also with soy (huge surprise). But I am afraid that if I stick to my safe foods, I will begin reacting to those as well. I thought quinoa was pretty safe, but began to worry a few weeks ago when I made a huge batch and ate a bit every day for probably 4-5 days. Sure enough, I am way off the top end of measurable for quinoa reactivity. What experiences can anyone share with gut healing, and also with rotation diets. How do you blend this with cooking for a family, and using up leftovers. I'd love to hear advice or get pointed towards reliable information on the web. A lot of it seems pointed towards autism or children's allergies. It's useful info but not directly relevant. Thanks.
  8. I just posted more details in the other allergy testing thread. But, I paid out of pocket for an extensive food panel by blood work. Best few hundred bucks I have spent in a long time! When combined with a modified elimination diet, it has guided me as I add foods back in and avoid others completely. I know enough about the pros/cons of these tests to take the results with a lot of caution, but for me it is an invaluable guide.
  9. This is interesting to me as I finally did a full food panel just a few months ago. It was by far the best few hundred bucks I have spent on this journey. I have been gluten free for 10 years, but the last couple of years that hasn't been enough. I kept getting "glutened" even when I knew the chances of exposure were minimal. I suspected other foods, but just couldn't nail anything down. But I avoided the testing since I kept hearing how unreliable it is. Even my naturopath discouraged the food panel since my diet was super clean and I was pretty good about minimizing common allergens. But we kept hitting dead ends. The combination of a modified elimination diet with the results of the food panel have changed my life in the last few months. I went on a pretty restricted diet for a few weeks - enough to convince myself that there was in fact a missing food piece. And now I have the test results to guide me as I add foods back in. I was off the charts high in reactions to anything that had ever been near a cow (all dairy, whey, casein, cheeses, beef). Other super high foods were eggs, almonds, mushrooms -- all things I ate regularly enough and never would have suspected as my reactions are always quite delayed. Interestingly some of the foods I suspected (soy, corn especially) showed very low reactions. Like you I had about 30 foods that showed significant reactions. My plan is to avoid all of those foods for the next year as I slowly add back in the foods that showed no reaction after the elimination process. So far it has been incredibly painless and I can't believe how good I feel. I keep asking my husband "Is this how normal people feel all the time?" If so, it sure beats the little bit of joy I got from eating dairy, eggs, almonds, wheat, etc. I just wish I had spent this money years ago and saved a lot of frustration and crappy days.
  10. Thanks guys. That's interesting that other people's sensitivity changes as well over long periods of time. It's definitely not processed foods as I have a very clean diet. Nothing processed. Mostly organic. Almost no dairy. This year I've been experimenting with cutting back on soy and corn though that doesn't seem to make much difference. I suspect there may be other food sensitivities cropping up, but can't figure out what they are. Or perhaps other foods just make me more sensitive to the tiny amounts of gluten I used to be ok with. Has anyone else experienced that? But, my instincts still think it has a lot to do with hormones.
  11. Hi, First post, but I have learned a lot from reading. I've been gluten-free for nearly 10 years for self diagnosed issues. Since then both blood and saliva testing show extreme intolerance- though no celiac testing. I'm 49. In the last year it seems that I am WAY more sensitive to gluten as well as other foods. I used to be able to limit gluten attacks to just a couple of times a year. In the past year, it seems to be about once a month. Especially the week right after my period, I think I am so much more sensitive. Is there any evidence for changing sensitivity with horomones - either just monthly cycling or perimenopause? Second question is wondering if there are any suggestions to speed up the process of getting unglutened. 4-5 days of hell from teriyaki sauce is ruining my week. The pattern is so predictable, I wonder if anyone has figured out a way to get over it faster!
×
×
  • Create New...