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Enterolab Results Comments Anyone?

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A) Gluten Sensitivity Stool and Gene Panel Complete *Best test/best value

Fecal Anti-gliadin IgA: 9 Units

Fecal Anti-tissue Transglutaminase IgA: 10 Units

Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score: 1267 Units

Fecal Anti-casein (cow's milk) IgA: 6 Units

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1: 0201

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2: 0202

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,2 (Subtype 2,2)

Interpretation of Fecal Anti-gliadin IgA (Normal Range is less than 10 Units): Intestinal antigliadin IgA antibody was below the upper limit of normal, and hence there is no direct evidence of active gluten sensitivity from this test. However, because 1 in 500 people cannot make IgA at all, and rarely, and some people can still have clinically significant reactions to a food antigen despite the lack of a significant antibody reaction (because the reactions primarily involve T cells), if you have a syndrome or symptoms known to be associated with gluten sensitivity, a gluten-free diet may help you despite a negative test. If you have no syndrome or symptoms associated with gluten sensitivity, you can follow a gluten-containing healthy diet and retest in 3-5 years; or you may opt to go gluten-free as a purely preventive measure.

Interpretation of Fecal Anti-tissue Transglutaminase IgA (Normal Range is less than 10 Units): You have an autoimmune reaction to the human enzyme tissue transglutaminase, secondary to dietary gluten sensitivity.

Interpretation of Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score (Normal Range is less than 300 Units): A fecal fat score greater than or equal to 300 Units indicates there is an increased amount of dietary fat in the stool which usually is due to gluten-induced small intestinal malabsorption/damage when associated with gluten sensitivity. Values between 300-600 Units are mild elevations, 600-1000 Units moderate elevations, and values greater than 1000 Units are severe elevations. Any elevated fecal fat value should be rechecked in one year after treatment to ensure that it does not persist because chronic fat malabsorption is associated with osteoporosis among other nutritional deficiency syndromes.

Interpretation of Fecal Anti-casein (cow's milk) IgA (Normal Range is less than 10 Units): Levels of fecal IgA antibody to a food antigen greater than or equal to 10 are indicative of an immune reaction, and hence immunologic "sensitivity" to that food. For any elevated fecal antibody level, it is recommended to remove that food from your diet. Values less than 10 indicate there currently is minimal or no reaction to that food and hence, no direct evidence of food sensitivity to that specific food. However, because 1 in 500 people cannot make IgA at all, and rarely, some people can still have clinically significant reactions to a food antigen despite the lack of a significant antibody reaction (because the reactions primarily involve T cells), if you have an immune syndrome or symptoms associated with food sensitivity, it is recommended that you try a strict removal of suspect foods from your diet for up to 12 months despite a negative test.

Interpretation Of HLA-DQ Testing: HLA-DQB1 gene analysis reveals that you have one of the main genes that predisposes to gluten sensitivity and celiac sprue (HLA-DQB1*0201 or HLA-DQB1*0302). Each of your offspring has a 50% chance of receiving this gene from you, and at least one of your parents passed it to you. You also have a second gene that by itself can rarely be associated with celiac sprue (HLA-DQ2 other than by HLA-DQB1*0201), and when associated with one of the main celiac genes, strengthens the predisposition to getting the disease, and with more severe manifestations. Having one celiac gene and one gluten sensitive gene, means that each of your parents, and all of your children (if you have them) will possess at least one copy of a gluten sensitive gene. Having two copies also means there is an even stronger predisposition to gluten sensitivity than having one gene and the resultant immunologic gluten sensitivity or celiac sprue may be more severe.

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That's pretty interesting! Your IgA levels are on the low side, but you have severe malabsorption. Perhaps you are IgA deficient?

That's a pretty high quantative fat score. Are you having your nutrient levels checked? No wonder you've been so sick!

You've had positive results on your gluten free diet, haven't you? Let us know how things go!

Janie

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That's pretty interesting! Your IgA levels are on the low side, but you have severe malabsorption. Perhaps you are IgA deficient?

That's a pretty high quantative fat score. Are you having your nutrient levels checked? No wonder you've been so sick!

You've had positive results on your gluten free diet, haven't you? Let us know how things go!

Janie

Thanks Janie...I was gluten free for over one month when I sent in the test to enterolab...and am now 2 months gluten free...and I am feeling better...

I wish I knew more about what my gene test means...

Does it mean I have 2 Celiac Genes?

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Thanks Janie...I was gluten free for over one month when I sent in the test to enterolab...and am now 2 months gluten free...and I am feeling better...

I wish I knew more about what my gene test means...

Does it mean I have 2 Celiac Genes?

It sounds like it. You may want to give them a call to clarify...I'm pretty sure I saw a number to contact them on their website.

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It sounds like it. You may want to give them a call to clarify...I'm pretty sure I saw a number to contact them on their website.

Yeah it does sound like 2 Celiac Genes...yikes

My IgA was just under 10 at 9 units and my Ttg was 10 after being Gluten free for over one month...

Not that high but my fecal fat was very high...geeezzz I am glad I went gluten free!

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I know this reply is very late, but I am researching the Interpretation of Fecal Anti-tissue Transglutaminase IgA and your post came up. I am very frustrated with Enterolab's lack of reply to my inquiries. I was desperate after recieving my results. You should know that the fecal test is less than meaningless and has NEVER been validated (neither in commercial, academic or other studies and certainly never by the FDA). There are several papers to this effect if you want to read them. You must get a blood test.

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About the gene question, you have

DQ 2,5 the main celiac gene , the one with the beta chain 0201

it usually has the alpha chain 0501 but it was not tested

and the other is

DQ 2,2 a gluten sensitive gene, with the beta chain 0202.

Now terminology evolves and Enterolab has not adjusted their terminology yet. This can be a bit confusing for patients who get test results, as 2,2 nowadays means the 0202 beta chain...but they mean Dq2 plus DQ2 without the 0201.

If they both are present, there is a higher risk for celiac.

That is a high fat result.

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