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Leena

Genetic Testing...Can Anyone Help Me Make Sense Of My Results?

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Hello All,

I am brand new to this forum. At the advice of a nutritionist, I sent away a swab test to Enterolab in Dallas, TX to see if I had the genes for gluten intolerance. (I also did the stool sample analysis). Though they have interpreted my results on paper, I still do not understand what they mean. I don't know if ya'll can even tread upon this territory (of interpretation) but if you can I would certainly appreciate any thoughts about these numbers:

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1: 0201

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2: 0402

Serologic Equivalent:HLA-DQ 2,4 (Subtype 2/4)

Fecal Anti-gliadin IgA: 6 units

Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score: Less than 300 units

Fecal Anti-tissue Transglutaminase: 2 Units

If you are not able to provide this interpretation here, can you direct me to a site that is EASY TO UNDERSTAND that might can help me?

Thank you so very much!

~Leena

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Hi!

actually you have the main celaic gene HLA DQ2, and it is probably really the DQ2,5 gene, the main celaic gene.

And another gene , DQ4, but it is not a celiac gene.

There are: DQ1, with subtypes 5 and 6, DQ2, with subtypes 2,2 and 2,5 , DQ3 with subtypes 7,8, and 9, and DQ4, the non-celiac gene. All the others have been found to be involved more or less in gluten sensitivity. DQ8 is tha other celiac gene, and DQ7 often ahs the celiac 05* alpha chain and is also a celaic gene.

Now the 2,4 thing that enterolab gave you as result, it does not mean it is a subtype of DQ2, it si only an old way to write down the genes. They just list the DQ2 and DQ4 divided by commas.

Also, they only test hte beta chains to keep costs down.

There is an explanation on DQ and the alpha and gbeta chains at wikipedia and some other places, but the charts at wikipedia are esily readable.

type in HLA DQ in en-wikipedia.org , and HLA DR is also useful. Then check the DQ2 pages, there are several if you do a search.

about 90% of celiacs have the HLA DQ2 gene.

But it si so common that just having the gene does not mean much by itself. You need some other things, like symptoms, vitamin deficiencies, malabsorption, autoimmine conditions, neurological symptoms, or positive biopsies.

I would think you have some symptoms, since you took the test?

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Hi!

actually you have the main celaic gene HLA DQ2, and it is probably really the DQ2,5 gene, the main celaic gene.

And another gene , DQ4, but it is not a celiac gene.

There are: DQ1, with subtypes 5 and 6, DQ2, with subtypes 2,2 and 2,5 , DQ3 with subtypes 7,8, and 9, and DQ4, the non-celiac gene. All the others have been found to be involved more or less in gluten sensitivity. DQ8 is tha other celiac gene, and DQ7 often ahs the celiac 05* alpha chain and is also a celaic gene.

Now the 2,4 thing that enterolab gave you as result, it does not mean it is a subtype of DQ2, it si only an old way to write down the genes. They just list the DQ2 and DQ4 divided by commas.

Also, they only test hte beta chains to keep costs down.

There is an explanation on DQ and the alpha and gbeta chains at wikipedia and some other places, but the charts at wikipedia are esily readable.

type in HLA DQ in en-wikipedia.org , and HLA DR is also useful. Then check the DQ2 pages, there are several if you do a search.

about 90% of celiacs have the HLA DQ2 gene.

But it si so common that just having the gene does not mean much by itself. You need some other things, like symptoms, vitamin deficiencies, malabsorption, autoimmine conditions, neurological symptoms, or positive biopsies.

I would think you have some symptoms, since you took the test?

Hi Nora,

I am so sorry to just now be back to look for replies! I was checking regularly at first, and then gave up. I was desperate enough tonight to come and see if MAYBE someone had responded. I appreciate your reply very much.

Here is my story, as brief as I can make it for you: I have just gone through a very difficult withdrawal from a benzodiazepine (klonopin), having taken my last dose back in November of '09. There are a percentage of people who have what is called "protracted withdrawal syndrome", which includes lots of different symptoms (including muscle and nerve pain). I am a regular on a forum called Benzo Buddies, and many of these people have expressed the symptoms of nerve and muscle pain during withdrawal. I have been holding out hope that all of my pain is related to this, but I keep having these question marks regarding if this could have a gluten component to it. Here is why:

As this process has been the most painful thing I have ever experienced, I decided to see a nutritionist to see if there is something I can do...a supplement I can take...to make this easier. After telling him a brief family history (which includes a mother and grandmother with Type 2 Diabetes, a brother with schizophrenia, a son with type 1 Juvenile diabetes, and myself, having psoriasis and also having been diagnosed with fibromyalgia) he suspected that I had the gluten gene in my history and that I was gluten intolerant.

I had already had the blood test about a year ago (negative). He suggested I get the genetic testing from Enterolab, and that I start on a gluten free diet. Over the past 2-3 months, I have tried the diet 4 times. The longest that I went was for 3 weeks, and I did not notice any change in how I felt. I really don't have much in the way of stomach issues. It is burning nerve pain and crippling muscle pain that sent me to the nutritionist.

During withdrawal from klonopin, people report days that are almost symptom free (these are called "windows) as well as days that are

filled with symptoms ("waves"). I have had a few of these windows, but most days are waves. Recovery from withdrawal is not linear...it is more up and down...and can last even up to a year.

I am trying to figure out if there is a way, once and for all, to know if my symptoms have any element of gluten intolerance to them. Should I have noticed a difference in how I felt after that 3 week trial? (I was very careful about what I ate, but I didn't worry about lotions, etc. The nutritionist didn't seem to think that was necessary for me). Do you think I need to give it longer to see any difference?

I would so deeply appreciate a response!

Thank you!

Leena

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Hi Leena

Are you finnish?

It took me 7 months totally off gluten to wake up one day and I was not so awfully fatigued anymore.

It can take a while.

Are you sure you do not have lyme disease? Lyme is also connected to gluten sensitivity, by the way. On lyme and symptoms, maybe you want to read a little on LymeMd's blog: http://lymemed.blogspot.com

Still, you do have the main celiac gene. (but so do a lot of other people who are not celiac)

Nora

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