Jump to content
  • Sign Up

sfm

Advanced Members
  • Content Count

    149
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

1 Neutral

1 Follower

About sfm

  • Rank
    Star Contributor

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Female
  • Location
    Huntington NY
  1. sfm

    Happy birthday and may God bless you today!

  2. On my last birthday, two of my coworkers in my office split the cost of two bags of gluten free cake mix, and one of them baked a chocolate/vanilla cake with homemade chocolate frosting. The office manager suggested having something "regular", but the rest of my coworkers insisted that they would eat the gluten free cake. And they did. I really got kind of choked up; it was so supportive and sweet of everyone. Also, a friend of mine just got married, and sent me a list of menu items that the caterer could make gluten free, so that they could prepare something special. I agree; people want to be supportive if they can. Sheryll
  3. My understanding is that goat milk does have casein, which is slightly different from cow's milk casein. It will vary from person to person how strongly they react, but it is not really recommended for someone with a casein intolerance.
  4. April, I have been through the same. I always downplay the seriousness of my "issues." Eventually I arrived at calling it a severe food allergy, as I feel that restaurants tend to take that more seriously. But I agree - those times when I do expose myself to cross-contamination, it is usually my own fault, as I am not clear enough about what I need. I have had some excellent experiences at restaurants, where they were completely on top of the separate preparation, etc. - but only when I make it clear. So why do I still sometimes downplay it? I also tend to become lax when I am feeling good, which is downright stupid. This weekend I had breakfast at a local restaurant where I've eaten numerous times with no problems. But they said they had hash browns, and I thought, yum, it never occurred to me that they might have bread crumbs until after my first bite, when my daughter said, Mom, those look like they have bread on them. So needless to say, this week I'm not feeling quite as good... Sheryll
  5. I have actually heard that you need to be careful with white rice; there can be flour added to prevent sticking . I know someone who can't tolerate brown rice - it gives her brain fog worse than gluten. She has less trouble with white rice, perhaps because of the processing? Sheryll
  6. I also could not eat raw vegetables for awhile, and almost no fruits at all. Brown rice was a godsend for me when my stomach wasn't doing well - and still is when I get accidentally 'glutened'. Some people do have to give up dairy at first, but can eventually have it back when their digestive systems have healed. It turns out I can't have casein (a milk protein) either, so dairy is a permanent no-no for me. I think I miss it more than gluten!! Try not to eat too many processed gluten free foods at first. Basically, anything that can be hard for the body to digest may be too much for your system right now, until the damage begins healing. So try sticking to meats, potatoes or rice, fruit if it doesn't upset your stomach, and vegetables (lightly steamed if they bother you raw). It takes time but you'll get used to noticing what feels okay to eat and what doesn't. And keep coming back to this website - it's loaded with information. Sheryll
  7. I agree with you. When someone says, I could never do it - it's more of a compliment, I think. My response is usually, If I hadn't been so sick, I'm not sure I could have done it, either. I've also had the comment about, Wow, I wish I had celiac, then I could look as good as you. I guess I just chalk it up to lack of understanding, but I also respond to the 'I have no willpower' or 'I'm so fat' with, "Well, you could always try my way and develop an autoimmune disorder which makes it difficult for you to eat!" I like to keep a sense of humor about the whole thing. I'm lucky, though - one of my coworkers baked a gluten free cake for my birthday, and everyone was very supportive and ate a piece and said, Hey, not bad! Sheryll
  8. It may or may not be the cashews - but I wanted to tell you that I discovered I had a tree nut allergy due to digestive symptoms first. Eventually it became severe enough that I developed hives after eating walnuts, and was very dizzy and sick. The allergist strongly recommended not eating any tree nuts, although walnuts and macadamias seem to have been the ones I have issues with. But just so you know that nut allergies can show up as gluten-like symptoms. But I have also heard that corn intolerance can as well. When trying to determine food allergies or intolerances with my children, my pediatrician suggested eliminating the food for 5-7 days, then reintroducing it. So you might want to try that with each, one at a time. Sheryll
  9. I agree about the Atkins not being a well balanced diet in the long term. But I think that most people think it's okay to eat like that long term, and when you read the book, you realize that you aren't supposed to. The initial phase is very low carb; eventually you work carbs back in. The other thing that a lot of other people don't realize is that the diet was initially developed for Dr Atkins' heart patients; those who were extremely overweight, and needed to lose a lot of weight for their health. Now people who have 20 lbs to drop use it, then use it again when they gain the weight back. I'm not sure that's a healthy thing; I think the Zone is more geared toward permanently changing your diet, right? I did use the Atkins after both pregnancies, when my babies were a year old, and I couldn't get rid of the last of my baby weight. But I went back to eating a balanced diet eventually. One thing it taught me was how many more carbs we eat than we need. So in the long term I became more aware of watching carbs and sugar, and I guess that's a positive thing, right? Sheryll
  10. I have been hypoglycemic for as long as I can remember - and it has not gotten better since gluten free. What I find helps is not having carbs for breakfast - I have only protein, and save my carbs for later in the day. That way I eliminate the spike which leads to the drop. As far as work, I used to bring nuts (but tested positive for that allergy, too) as a high protein snack, so now I bring an apple - but not too much fruit, as I am very sensitive to sugar. I like to snack on pepperoni and rice chips. For breakfast, sausage, hard-boiled eggs or egg salad. For lunch, veggies and turkey or ham, or a salad, or chicken with veggies (leftovers). The biggest thing for me has been to cut way way back on the amount of sugar in my diet. I can handle carbs to some degree - but still not as my first meal, then I end up with a reaction within a couple of hours. I hope that helps. Sheryll
  11. Oh god no, you are not alone!!! You're new to being gluten free - it does improve with time, but right now your insides are still so screwed up, it's going to take awhile. I still carry a couple of immodium in my purse, just in case - but I used to carry a whole box! Never mind the bloating and gas issues. I wish I had more suggestions; I just can offer you hope - it does get better with time. Sheryll
  12. I just want to insert my "sci-fi-ish" story, FYI - I know how far fetched this is: My friend and I took our children for pizza - obviously, I didn't have any. However, I did help serve the pizza to the kids. Since we were out, and I wasn't eating right away, I neglected to wash my hands. We went home a short while later, at which time I (starving) took a couple of slices of pepperoni and some carrots out of the fridge to munch on. After a few bites, I thought, Duh, I never washed my hands - oh, well, it's been awhile, I'm sure it'll be fine. 20 minutes later my daughter walked in on me throwing up everything I ate - because along with what little I ate, I threw in some flour from the bottom of the pizza slices. My children serve their own pizza now - it was a real eye opener for them. Crazy but true. Sheryll
  13. All I can say is I have gotten better at it with time. It might seem like a pain, but I wash my hands, the counter, handles, etc. frequently, to avoid the very things you mention. Never touch vegetables or fruit without thoroughly rinsing them. My children (not gluten free) wash their hands, clear plates, etc., so I can avoid touching gluten when possible. I carry wipes in my purse to clean my hands when I can't wash them thoroughly. So how often do I get glutened? When I first went gluten free, at least once every few days. After a few months, probably 2 to 3 times a month. More recently, I can say with some confidence that I haven't been glutened more than once in the last 2 months. Not bad, all things considered - and I have a violent reaction to the smallest amounts of gluten - so I usually know within 20 minutes to one hour. Sheryll
  14. Unfortunately, even specialists misdiagnose celiac frequently. There's still so little knowledge in the medical community. I also self-diagnosed myself through dietary response, but followed up with Enterolab, which confirmed my thoughts. However, having said that, I recently did have a full workup by a GI, just to rule any other conditions out. Just because you are gluten intolerant does not mean there's nothing else going on, you know? Luckily for me, the colonoscopy checked out fine. Not so luckily, the upper endoscopy showed two ulcers and inflammation in my small bowel (after being gluten free for 9 months). So it's best to go ahead with the tests, I think. I never suspected I had ulcers because the pain in my stomach was NOTHING compared to what I feel/felt when I ingest gluten. Now, in restrospect, I realize I have been walking around with what I call "mild" burning pain in my stomach for months! Just remember going in that you know you are gluten intolerant, no matter what any tests show - I kept that attitude going in. My GI said that if the upper came back negative, he wanted to put me on IBS meds and have me eat gluten. I just smiled, thinking, No freaking way am I going to voluntarily eat gluten! Sheryll
×
×
  • Create New...