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mle321

Can Anyone Else Tolerate European Breads/Flours?

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I just returned from a glorious 2 week trip to Europe, extra glorious for the reason that I was able to completely tolerate any bread I ate there. For someone who has had digestive issues since high school it was AMAZING. While I am not celiac-diagnosed, I have worked closely with a naturopath in the states to determine that it is wheat which I can't tolerate - even consuming the smallest amount will normally put me in pain for the day to the extent of having to call out sick. So I was shocked to discover that I could eat anything in Europe. Has anyone else had this experience? Any ideas on why? Am starting to wonder if wheat is treated with something here that's different, not the gluten...

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maybe different kinds of wheat?

researchers know that different sorts of wheat have different toxicity, because the are researching a way to delete the most toxic parts of the genes of some ancient wheat types so most celiacs can toleate it. (they plan to slice these genes into modern wheat and create a nww kind with toxic genes removed)

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I am much better off here in Brazil than I was in the US. I feel like the wheat is different.

Why do you feel that you are better off in Brazil than in the US? If you have Celiac Disease/Gluten Sensitivity, you cannot have any wheat, period. Doesn't matter whether it's "different" wheat or not...wheat is wheat and it all contains gluten. Plus, the US is so far ahead of many countries when it comes to manufactured gluten-free products. After 5 years gluten-free, I am still amazed at the number of products coming out on the market on a weekly basis.

As for Europe, been there many times and I NEVER eat any bread or carbs there, unless I can guarantee that the product is truly gluten-free. They use different standards than those applied here in the States. Yeah, I know we don't have an official standard in the US yet but it's easy enough to determine gluten-free status on a product, once you get the hang of the diet. On some European products, I believe, they allow up to 200ppm and that's kind of weird, if you ask me. I bring my own bread with me, make sure wherever I stay has a fridge, and bring the toaster bags. If you stick to lean protein, veggies and fruit while away, you'll never get sick.

Before I was diagnosed, on my trips to Europe, I would get sick and have to load up on Immodium to leave the hotel room. I was eating the bread and pastries so I reacted badly to them, although I didn't know it at the time. Thought it was traveler's diarrhea! :blink:

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The few times I accidentally ate gluten while traveling in Europe I had no reaction.

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Different wheats have different toxic genes.

Scientists are working on wheat that is not toxic to most celiacs (it will not work on all celiacs because different celiacs react to different gliadins)

Of course, one must stay gluten free if diagnosed celiac.

Maybe in the future there will be non-toxic wheat for celiacs.

Here is more about ancient wheat, in case someone is interested:

http://www.growseed.org/wheat.html

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Different wheats have different toxic genes.

Scientists are working on wheat that is not toxic to most celiacs (it will not work on all celiacs because different celiacs react to different gliadins)

Of course, one must stay gluten free if diagnosed celiac.

Maybe in the future there will be non-toxic wheat for celiacs.

Here is more about ancient wheat, in case someone is interested:

http://www.growseed.org/wheat.html

I understand your point completely and am very well versed in ancient grains and their gluten content (I studied nutrition) but I also know what kind of wheat Europeans use and it isn't close to ancient wheat. They do not use GMO products but their bread and pastries are gluten loaded.

Extremely refined wheat, like we use here in the States.

I would guess that those who do not react are not extremely sensitive or are the non-symptomatic Celiacs. I got deathly ill a few times on vacation and it was the wheat. Wouldn't touch it with a ten foot pole..... :huh:

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yes you have a point, there is about 11-13 grams of protein in 100 grams of wheat flour here.

That is huge compared to the codex wheat starch here, which is about 100 ppm remaining gluten.

And, one is only supposed to eat at the maximum 100 grams of finished product with codex wheat starch anyway.

Depending on sources, gluten is 80 or 90% of the protein content in wheat flour.

We actually import some american or canadian wheat for items that need a higher gluten content, as we cannot grow the high gluten wheat variants here in the north.

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