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Nancym

Trying To Lose?

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Here's a link to another article about how consuming plenty of protein makes weight loss easier:

http://weightoftheevidence.blogspot.com/

To understand how protein requirements may play in human eating habits, the researchers "incarcerated 10 people in a chalet for six day," to monitor their eating.

For the first two days they could eat what they wanted from a buffet. For the next two days, one group was restricted to high-protein foods, such as chicken and meat, the other to fatty, sugary, low-protein foods, such as croissants.

The first group consumed exactly the same amount of protein as on the first two days. "The second group went way off the mark and just kept on eating until eventually, through their over-consumption of carbohydrate-rich foods, they managed to fill their protein intake."

As Dr. Simpson noted, "A slight shift in the diet towards a lower proportion of protein can have catastrophic effects, your body will stop you eating when you reach the right amount."

And another about the hormone PYY and protein:

http://weightoftheevidence.blogspot.com/20...of-pyy-and.html

Dietary protein enhances satiety and promotes weight loss, but the mechanisms by which appetite is affected remain unclear. We investigated the role of gut hormones, key regulators of ingestive behavior, in mediating the satiating effects of different macronutrients. In normal-weight and obese human subjects, high-protein intake induced the greatest release of the anorectic hormone peptide YY (PYY) and the most pronounced satiety. Long-term augmentation of dietary protein in mice increased plasma PYY levels, decreased food intake, and reduced adiposity. To directly determine the role of PYY in mediating the satiating effects of protein, we generated Pyy null mice, which were selectively resistant to the satiating and weight-reducing effects of protein and developed marked obesity that was reversed by exogenous PYY treatment. Our findings suggest that modulating the release of endogenous satiety factors, such as PYY, through alteration of specific diet constituents could provide a rational therapy for obesity.

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