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sahm-i-am

Will My Home Reno Cause Me Problems?

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After some basic research I think I'm beginning to panic. After Christmas we are going to be doing some minor renovations (in our kitchen no less!!!!!! :blink: ). I started wondering about inhaled gluten and the drywall and joint compound. We are the do-it-yourself type. Even if I wear an OSHA mask, this stuff is going to be ALL OVER MY HOUSE! And my gluten free kitchen (sob). Aaaccckkkk! I suppose lots of plastic tarps, tape, and totally emptying the kitchen are in my future? Any other home reno survivors out there???


Diagnosed with Lymphoma March 2010. After surgery doctors said "Oops!"

Diagnosed with Celiac Disease April 2010. After endoscopy doc said "Aren't you glad?"

Uhhh.....yeah!

DD #1 ('99) tested negative on bloodwork but positive on 2 genetic markers. Went gluten free in July 2010 and has been symptom-free ever since!

DD #2 ('98) tested negative and has no symptoms. Didn't fork out money for genetic testing. Will watch and test regularly.

Husband tested positive in July 2010 and has refused to go gluten free. Uh huh, that's gonna bite him in the a** one day! (Pun intended!)

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5. Drywall and Building Supplies

If you're renovating your home or even just doing some minor repairs, you should know that some of the products you may use contain gluten ingredients.

For example, some brands of drywall and almost all of the compounds used to conceal drywall seams ("mudding" compounds) contain wheat as an ingredient, as do the spackle repair compounds used to fix small holes in walls. Gluten also can be found as part of the glue in some plywood, especially interior-grade plywood.

When you cut or sand these products, you'll be breathing (and swallowing) gluten dust, and that can lead to a horrible glutening. Wearing a full HEPA respirator (not just a dusk mask) can help, but you'd be better off leaving very dusty home repairs to someone else.

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5. Drywall and Building Supplies

If you're renovating your home or even just doing some minor repairs, you should know that some of the products you may use contain gluten ingredients.

For example, some brands of drywall and almost all of the compounds used to conceal drywall seams ("mudding" compounds) contain wheat as an ingredient, as do the spackle repair compounds used to fix small holes in walls. Gluten also can be found as part of the glue in some plywood, especially interior-grade plywood.

When you cut or sand these products, you'll be breathing (and swallowing) gluten dust, and that can lead to a horrible glutening. Wearing a full HEPA respirator (not just a dusk mask) can help, but you'd be better off leaving very dusty home repairs to someone else.

How do you or I know which products have wheat in them? Had a hard time trying to find out on 1 kind of construction glue. How do you know what drywall, etc is made of?


 

 

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Finding out what kind of drywall, joint compound, etc. a builder used years ago is impossible. Demolition is going to cause so much dust. What a mess. And my doctor just told me to be extra hyper vigilant as my numbers aren't going down (Celiac blood panel). Any others out there that have been through a remodel? I'm still researching and if I find anything I'll post here for others.


Diagnosed with Lymphoma March 2010. After surgery doctors said "Oops!"

Diagnosed with Celiac Disease April 2010. After endoscopy doc said "Aren't you glad?"

Uhhh.....yeah!

DD #1 ('99) tested negative on bloodwork but positive on 2 genetic markers. Went gluten free in July 2010 and has been symptom-free ever since!

DD #2 ('98) tested negative and has no symptoms. Didn't fork out money for genetic testing. Will watch and test regularly.

Husband tested positive in July 2010 and has refused to go gluten free. Uh huh, that's gonna bite him in the a** one day! (Pun intended!)

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Finding out what kind of drywall, joint compound, etc. a builder used years ago is impossible. Demolition is going to cause so much dust. What a mess. And my doctor just told me to be extra hyper vigilant as my numbers aren't going down (Celiac blood panel). Any others out there that have been through a remodel? I'm still researching and if I find anything I'll post here for others.

Is there someplace else you can stay while the demolition is going on? If not seal off the room with sheets of heavy plastic. I would literally tape the workers in there and if there is a door to the outside from that room have them use it. If you dampen drywall seams before sanding that can keep the dust down a bit. Good luck. When we remodeled we used tongue and groove, wood on the walls and a synthetic tongue and groove material that was lightweight on the ceiling. No drywall dust to worry about that way.


Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying

"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)

Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002

Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis

All bold resoved or went into remission in time with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002

 Gene Test Aug 2007

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

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