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kvirmani

Can Melatonin Increase Antibodies?

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I have had Celiac for 5 years.  When I was diagnosed, my antibodies were high - off the charts.  They slowly came down until they were normal or near normal.  I recently did antibody labs again and some parts of the test results were higher than at diagnosis.  I would rate my compliance to gluten-free diet as an A+.  I am freakishly careful and eat only gluten-free food made in my dedicated gluten-free kitchen.  The only change I have made is 3 months ago I began taking Melatonin at bedtime to help with sleep.  Researching melatonin, I discovered that it stimulates the immune system so am thinking maybe that caused an increase in antibodies.  Has anyone else had experience with Melatonin affecting Celiac control?  Thanks for whatever help you can provide.   

Edited by kvirmani
Took out one sentence

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Not noticed anything like that, I take foods that promote higher immune responses all the time I eat seeds and nuts that promote tryptophan and melatonin levels, I take vitamin C, Iron, Vitamin D and various other supplements.

You mention some of your results where higher, are you talking about overall antibody count or just ones in reference to the gluten proteins and relevant to celiac? If just your normal antibodies and not celiac related ones it could be triggered by a mild bug, bacteria, or virus your body is fighting in the background or a allergy. Heck could even be a minor intolerance or allergy to food you developed and you body fighting it in the BG,

IF your celiac antibodies are higher, then you have gluten somewhere in your living environment, perhaps not a food but a lotions, soap, or shampoo. Could be a supplement or medication or I have heard of a few people reacting to construction where they used wheat in the plaster and they inhaled it or like me I can get foggy dizzy numb from walking through a bakery at the grocery store.

There is also Refractory Celiac Disease where your do not respond to a gluten-free diet and you would need immunesysterm suppressants, but this is quite rare.

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 I did a quick search and it seems like Melatonin might not be safe for those with autoimmune disease:

https://www.hopkinslupus.org/lupus-info/lifestyle-additional-information/avoid/

http://www.arthritis.org/living-with-arthritis/treatments/natural/supplements-herbs/guide/melatonin.php

I did not find anything specific to celiac disease....yet.  Of course, there is the chance that the supplement might have had  gluten contamination.  

Curious.  Which antibodies test was elevated?  

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Hi!  Melatonin is Not recommended for someone with an autoimmune disease.  If you mean your ANA level is higher than it was years ago---- that is actually 'normal' for many of us.  It simply is an indication that you have an Autoimmune disease.  You should watch yourself however, to see that you haven't developed any others-----like Diabetes, Thyroid disease---Hashimotos in particular, or Sjogren's Syndrome--- because those are the ones that seem to 'hang-out' with Celiac Disease.  if your Primary care doc isn't familiar with all the blood work, it might get be worthwhile to see a Rheumatologist--- for an extra voice.  (I follow-up once a year with a great Rheumy, though I only have SS and celiac disease!!) Best Wishes and stay gluten-free!!

yvonne

 

 

 

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Ok this has me really worried, I take melatonin every night, I cant get any decent sleep without it ?

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1 hour ago, EenieNeNe said:

Ok this has me really worried, I take melatonin every night, I cant get any decent sleep without it ?

Try 2-4 tsp of pumpkin seed protein powder before bed with 2-4 oz a nut based milk.

"Pumpkin seeds and the powder from pumpkin seeds have relatively high amounts of the amino acid tryptophan. Tryptophan is the amino acid the body uses to make the feel-good and relaxation neurotransmitter serotonin.  Pumpkin seeds also contain high amounts of zinc, which can help the brain convert tryptophan into serotonin. Serotonin levels are typically low in people who cannot stay asleep and wake throughout the night.

It is best to the powder with applesauce or another healthy carbohydrate; the carbohydrate allows the tryptophan to get into the brain in higher amounts. 

By Pina LoGiudice ND, LAc and Peter Bongiorno ND, LAc Directors of Inner Source Health"

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