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Ursa Major

Tests Finished

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Okay, I am done being a guinea pig, I am now sure of all my intolerances (at least I hope that's all, or I won't have anything left I can eat).

Yesterday I decided to test the salicylates. I took Aspirin, and, for good measure (and because it might be my last chance to eat those things) ate honey, a peppermint candy, a clementine orange, some grapes and some almonds. Today I woke up with my whole body aching all over, even my skin is aching (and my head, of course). That's the way I used to feel all the time, and it was the reason I was on codeine 24 hours a day for four years (and for the additional pain the lectins caused, of course). So, today I am back on codeine (hopefully won't need it tomorrow).

So, here is my analysis of which foods cause what:

Gluten and dairy: Gastrointestinal problems (diarrhea, rumbling in the bowels, occasional horrible stomach and bowel cramps that make me think I'm going to die), severe lower back pain, dizziness, brainfog, vision problems, depression, moodiness, asthma and a host of other things.

Lectins (this is a link): Disabling pain in my feet, knees and hands and all joints, excessive need for sleep, constant tearing from the outer corners of my eyes, stomach ache, acid reflux, headaches, hives, acne, dermatitis and others.

The nightshade family (potatoes, tomatoes, peppers, eggplant): Potatoes cause gastrointestinal problems (diarrhea, bowel cramps), the tomatoes cause migraines and I'm not completely sure what the other two do. Also, nightshades contain salicylates AND lectins and cause aches and pains as well.

Salicylates (this is a link):

Generalized body pain (as in: aching all over, a burning ache in EVERY SINGLE part of my body, including my skin).

Well, now at least I know and can focus on the few things I now can still eat and get on with my life. It won't be easy, but it will be possible. And if it means that I will find out what it feels like to be well, it will be worth it.

Ursula

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Okay, I am done being a guinea pig, I am now sure of all my intolerances (at least I hope that's all, or I won't have anything left I can eat).

Yesterday I decided to test the salicylates. I took Aspirin, and, for good measure (and because it might be my last chance to eat those things) ate honey, a peppermint candy, a clementine orange, some grapes and some almonds. Today I woke up with my whole body aching all over, even my skin is aching (and my head, of course). That's the way I used to feel all the time, and it was the reason I was on codeine 24 hours a day for four years (and for the additional pain the lectins caused, of course). So, today I am back on codeine (hopefully won't need it tomorrow).

So, here is my analysis of which foods cause what:

Gluten and dairy: Gastrointestinal problems (diarrhea, rumbling in the bowels, occasional horrible stomach and bowel cramps that make me think I'm going to die), severe lower back pain, dizziness, brainfog, vision problems, depression, moodiness, asthma and a host of other things.

Lectins (this is a link): Disabling pain in my feet, knees and hands and all joints, excessive need for sleep, constant tearing from the outer corners of my eyes, stomach ache, acid reflux, headaches, hives, acne, dermatitis and others.

The nightshade family (potatoes, tomatoes, peppers, eggplant): Potatoes cause gastrointestinal problems (diarrhea, bowel cramps), the tomatoes cause migraines and I'm not completely sure what the other two do. Also, nightshades contain salicylates AND lectins and cause aches and pains as well.

Salicylates (this is a link):

Generalized body pain (as in: aching all over, a burning ache in EVERY SINGLE part of my body, including my skin).

Well, now at least I know and can focus on the few things I now can still eat and get on with my life. It won't be easy, but it will be possible. And if it means that I will find out what it feels like to be well, it will be worth it.

Ursula

Hi Ursula

I have many of the same symptoms as you. I have checked out your links, very informative thanks! I have sort of been doing a detox/ellimination diet for the last few weeks. I have had some days where I have felt really well but we have had to travel a lot so the re-introduction and testing has been confusing. Firstly how many aspirin did you take to test for salicylates? Over the last couple of days I have had, grapes, wine, pork, pears, bananas, cranberry & apple juice (I don't normally drink juice or eat a lot of fruit) nuts and raisons to snack on, extra strong mints and soy milk (I'v run out of gluten-free rice milk and swapped to soy because my dairy issues) tea, leeks, broccoli, asparagras. rice, quona. all things that I had managed to cut out. No nightshades as my daughter is very sensitive to them. My chronic pain and brain fog are back. What do you actually eat? I would really like to go back to basic foods for a week and test food groups once and for all!

I would be grateful for your advice.

Donna

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Firstly how many aspirin did you take to test for salicylates? Over the last couple of days I have had, grapes, wine, pork, pears, bananas, cranberry & apple juice (I don't normally drink juice or eat a lot of fruit) nuts and raisons to snack on, extra strong mints and soy milk (I'v run out of gluten-free rice milk and swapped to soy because my dairy issues) tea, leeks, broccoli, asparagras. rice, quona.

Okay, here goes: grapes, wine, cranberry and apple juice (or any juice for that matter), raisins, mints, tea are some of the worst things you could be having when sensitive to salicylates. All of those have extremely high levels of them.

PEELED pears have none (the peel is the problem here), bananas have none, pork should be fine (but may not, everybody is different), most nuts are a bad idea, but hazelnuts in moderation are okay. All dried fruits are terrible, as they concentrate the already bad salicylates, so raisins are especially terrible, and mints (natural and artificial) are one of the worst things.

When testing for salicylates I used six chewable kid's aspirin (the same amount as one regular adult aspirin). If you take the coated kind you won't get an accurate result, because it won't dissolve in your stomach.

A note of caution: If you use too much aspirin if you're sensitive to salicylates, you can go into anaphylactic shock, since Aspirin is pure salicylic acid, so is one big salicylate. If you don't react negatively to Aspirin, you're not salicylate intolerant.

What you would want to do is cut out all foods high in salicylates for a week, which might stop most pain if that is the problem. Then you take the aspirin. I had a delayed reaction to it (that's why these things don't show up in any allergy or intolerance testing). I felt almost fine that night, but woke up feeling absolutely dreadful and was sick all day the next day. It took a week to feel totally better.

Here is what I CAN eat:

The only oils I can use are cold-pressed sunflower oil and lard. The only sweetener is maple syrup. The only seasoning is sea salt. I can use some parsley, garlic, dill and chives (small amounts).

I can eat meat (no organ meats and shellfish). Fruits are peeled pears, sometimes peeled golden delicious apples (all others are worse), and one banana a week (I don't tolerate more than that for whatever other reason).

I only drink water and chamomile tea.

Completely safe vegetable are: Bamboo shoots, cabbage, celery, rutabaga, iceberg lettuce.

In limited amounts (not every day, vary those) Brussels sprouts, shallots, grean peas, leek, red cabbage. In very small amounts (not too often): Asparagus, carrots, beetroot, cauliflower, onion, turnip, green beans.

Seeds and nuts: The only seed 100% safe is poppy seeds. Sunflower seeds and hazelnuts are allowed in small amounts.

I sometimes use buckwheat, tapioca and arrowroot flour to make pancakes. I find I can tolerate some goats milk in those.

There you have it, that's all I usually eat. For every meal, in varying combinations.

And I don't find it hard, because I feel so much better!

I hope this was some help.

Ursula

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Okay, here goes: grapes, wine, cranberry and apple juice (or any juice for that matter), raisins, mints, tea are some of the worst things you could be having when sensitive to salicylates. All of those have extremely high levels of them.

I hope this was some help.

Ursula

Thank you Ursula,

Your reply was really helpful. I havn't had ordinary tea for 2 weeks before today and I feel dreadful! And I'v been binging today on raisins, wine, grapes. I found a terry's chocolate orange in the fridge and demolished that too. :( I do seem to crave all the 'baddies' if I have even one so an intolerance would make sense. I think the soy triggered the binge. I will take your advice and cut everything out for a week and then test aspirin. Giving up wine totally will be terrible, my other half is in the wine trade ;-( we have a wine cellar. :( wine is my drug of choice after a hard day. :rolleyes:

Once I get myself sorted out I am thinking of going back to college/open university and doing a nutrition degree/course of some kind so that I can help others/start another business (I used to have profitable small accounting business before I lost the mental focus and ability do sums!) , perhaps web based offering testing and a diet profile I will have to do some research and see if there is a business plan that could work. i would love to be economically active again and earn a living. I hate being dependant on my other half because of my illness. I feel driven to get answers.

I 'diagnosed' 2 of our christmas visitors with gluten problems, one has had celiac disease confirmed by testing (she also had unexplained infertility) and the other was negative on EMA bloods but had been almost gluten-free for 2 years and has classic symptoms. Her Doctor has celiac disease but is not up to date with research, what a waste. My children cringe when I 'diagnose' friends over the dinner table, but I don't want people to suffer for years like me and my family have. I would like to reach the people 'under the iceberg.'

Thanks again

Donna

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