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WHinNOVA

How Do I Know If I'm Lactose Intolerant

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I was diagnosed two weeks ago and have been on a rigid gluten-free diet since then. I like dairy, especially cheese, and have not eliminated it from my diet. I read here that sometimes during the first few months of the gluten-free diet it is not unusual to be lactose intolerant. I'm wondering how I will know if I am or not.

Before diagnosis and going gluten-free, I did not have stool or D problems. I was one of those Celiacs with no symptoms (although I do have the "brain fog" / general lack of energy/focus). I have not noticed any stool change since going gluten-free.

The doctor handling the diagnosis did say my Celiac was quite advanced with significant damage to the SI. Thus, I could understand having digestive problems with challending foods (like diary) as I adjust to the new diet and the SI heals. But I don't know what warning signs tells me I'm lactose intolerant. What do I need to watch for to know if I need to lay off the dairy for awhile?

Thanks,

WH

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The only way to find out is to eliminate dairy from your diet for at least two weeks to see if you see an improvement in your symptoms. If you do you have your answer.

It is extremely likely that you can't tolerate dairy for at least a while (about six months) until your villi heal. You can try reintroducing dairy then to see if you can tolerate it again. If it still causes you to be sick after six months to a year it is likely a casein intolerance, and you would have to eliminate all dairy for life.


I am a German citizen, married to a Canadian 29 years, four daughters, one son, seven granddaughters and four grandsons, with one more grandchild on the way in July 2009.

Intolerant to all lectins (including gluten), nightshades (potatoes, tomatoes, peppers, eggplant) and salicylates.

Asperger Syndrome, Tourette Syndrome, Addison's disease (adrenal insufficiency), hypothyroidism, fatigue syndrome, asthma

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