Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):


Join eNewsletter


Celiac.com Sponsor (A1-m):



Join eNewsletter

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Breila

Son Has Celiac, Next Step For Me Is?

Recommended Posts

My son was just "officially" diagnosed as celiac after 4 years of suspecting it. We went the whole route if you will, down to the endoscopy, so that we could have the definitive diagnosis b/c he was only moderately symptomatic.

Genetics wise, I've always figured it came from my husband's side of the family, his father has a "wheat allergy", and he's always had what *I* call bowel issues, though HE says he's fine, LOL. I'm not looking for anyone to blame, just figured that was where it came from.

But I've been thinking recently about my own health. I've had intermittent nervous/sensitive stomach issues my whole adult life, though I've always linked them to stressful points in my life (needless to say, I'm a mess right now, LOL). I have frequent headaches, low energy, and skin problems.

I've decided to have the blood work done, especially in light of my son's diagnosis. I have to find a primary care dr. first, LOL. But here's what I'm wondering. If I DO have the blood tests done and they come back with high/abnormal numbers, is it reasonable to assume that I too have Celiac, or should I have an endoscopy done as well? What if the numbers come back in normal ranges?

What do you think?

Blessings,

Amy


Blessings,

Amy, mama to 3 awesome boys!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Celiac.com Sponsor (A8):

Celiac.com Sponsor (A8):


There are a great many people who are gluten intolerant without villi destruction. Those people would have normal blood work, and a negative biopsy. With them, the gluten primarily attacks the nervous system. Which is just as bad!

People might have peripheral neuropathy, gluten ataxia, pain in joints and muscles, fibromyalgia, depression, anxiety, schizophrenia, bi-polar, ADHD, autism, dementia, multiple sclerosis and a host of other ailments that all go away on a gluten-free diet. Plus they might get the more typical diarrhea and other gastrointestinal symptoms as well.

So, while it may be a good idea for you to get the testing done, too, I advise you to try the gluten-free diet after the tests are done, whether they are negative or positive. It is the diet that is the best and most reliable test of them all. If you feel better on it, then you shouldn't eat gluten. Period.


I am a German citizen, married to a Canadian 29 years, four daughters, one son, seven granddaughters and four grandsons, with one more grandchild on the way in July 2009.

Intolerant to all lectins (including gluten), nightshades (potatoes, tomatoes, peppers, eggplant) and salicylates.

Asperger Syndrome, Tourette Syndrome, Addison's disease (adrenal insufficiency), hypothyroidism, fatigue syndrome, asthma

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites