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terin514

I Have So Many Questions! I Hope Someone Can Help! Gluten, Soy, Yeast, Egg, Casein Sensitities!

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Hi Everyone -

Here is my background - Terrible digestive issues for my entire life... and with family members who had similar dysfunction, I grew up thinking C/D, bloating, gas, pain, depression, everything else that goes along with this was "normal". Also, my family is of the "what doesn't kill you makes you stronger" and the "don't be such a hypocondriac" ilk, so I really never sought medical help until I was in my early-mid 30's. As you all already know, traditional doctors aren't well trained in this area, so I was given the "IBS" diagnosis and told to eat more whole grains. Fast forward a few years, I found this wonderful site, self diagnosed and sent away for the Enterolab panel. I also tested for Soy, Yeast, and Egg intolerances and found I am sensitive to EVERYTHING. I will post my Enterolab results at the end of my questions.

I have a number of questions - I am hoping this wonderful community where so many people have great insight, research and suggestions can help me. Keep in mind, my questions relate to every type of sensitivity, so if you don't have the answers for all of them - that's fine - if you can answer even just one, perhaps others can fill in the blanks. I really appreciate everyone's help!

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1. What does having an "immunologic sensitivity" to a food really mean? Is it an allergy? Is it an auto-immune reaction? (Is there a difference?) In my results, each of the casein, yeast, soy, egg tests indicate "immunologic sensitivity" to that food - plus, the gluten test said I have gluten sensitivity PLUS "an autoimmune reaction to the human enzyme tissue transglutaminase, secondary to dietary gluten sensitivity." What does that mean?

2. I read that if you OVEREAT a certain food, you can develop an intolerance to that food. Is it possible this is the case for some of my other sensitivities? I ate egg whites for breakfast almost every day for probably a few years... I thought I was eating a healthy breakfast. Oops <_<

3. Along these lines, now I'm afraid I'm going to develop an intolerance to Chicken, Rice and Lettuces... it's been my diet staple for years!

4. Is the immunologic sensitivity to ovalbumin to the EGG WHITE, or the WHOLE EGG? Can I still eat an egg yolk without reaction?

5. What about flu shots? People with allergies to chicken eggs are usually steered clear of getting a flu shot. I have had one without reaction every year for the last 4 or 5 years... what do you think about me getting a flu shot based on the results?

6. With a soy sensitivity, is Soy Lecithin off the list too? I've looked it up and seen conflicting results - this ingredient seems to be in EVERYTHING - even the chewing gum on my desk!

7. What about drinking wine? I've read the yeast is dead, I've also read to eliminate alcohol on a yeast-free diet (I already do not drink Beer or Ales b/c of the gluten). I might note that I am in the Wine Industry - and this would be very problematic!

8. What about Goat's Milk? Can I eat Goat Cheese? I don't eat very much of it, but I do love it... Does Anti-Casein - which specifically says Cow's Milk - mean anti EVERY type of cheese, or can I keep eating some feta and other goat's milk cheeses?

9. I am having symptoms where my fingers get stiff and feel hot. Is this connected? I did forget the other day and I had 1/4 of a hard boiled egg that came on a salad before I remembered that I shouldn't eat those anymore.

10. What do you think my next steps should be? Should I see a GI doctor? An allergist? I'm not sure what to do next (other than modify my diet) - I saw the recommendations for BioCard - I will look that up, given my levels I probably should get some sort of follow up, don't you think? Also, should I see if I have even more food intolerances? I'm getting to the point where I'm afraid to eat anything for fear of developing even MORE intolerances... and my diet is already limited. I went the Enterolab route because my GP was not really helpful other than telling me I have IBS and to "eat more whole grains" - Thanks Doc! ;)

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MY ENTEROLAB RESULTS:

Fecal Anti-gliadin IgA: 122 Units (Normal Range is less than 10 Units)

Fecal Anti-tissue Transglutaminase IgA: 29 Units (Normal Range is less than 10 Units)

Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score: 715 Units (Normal Range is less than 300 Units)

Fecal Anti-casein (cow

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***

1. What does having an "immunologic sensitivity" to a food really mean?

I tend to think of allergy as meaning - "must cary epi-pen to avoid anaphalactic shock" and all the rest as intolerances or delayed allergies.

Reading up on the terms innate and adaptive immunity may help you understand it better. There are 4 types of immunoglobulins - IgE, IgG, IgA and IgM that you may also find interesting. I only remember that IgE can be remembered by thinking "emergency" or "epi-pen"

I have heard that the yeast intolerance can be overcome with time. Not sure about soy, but I have doubts that it is a good food to eat anyway, unless prepared in a traditional way. I've read that a few people are able to re-introduce eggs after "1-2 years" but most are not. I have read conflicting advice as to duck eggs vs hen eggs.

The gluten and casein intolerances, in adults, are generally considered to be permanent, as far as I know.

2. - can't do much with this one, sorry.

3. Along these lines, now I'm afraid I'm going to develop an intolerance to Chicken, Rice and Lettuces... it's been my diet staple for years!

You might want to read about "leaky gut" or intestinal permeability. As your health improves, as I understand it, the chances that you will develop further intolerances decreases. However, please note that non-foods can increase permeability - NSAIDS are a prime example.

4. Is the immunologic sensitivity to ovalbumin to the EGG WHITE, or the WHOLE EGG? Can I still eat an egg yolk without reaction?

There are blood tests that can help you determine egg whites vs yolks and casein vs whey. They are subject to false positives and false negatives and you will have to do a food challenge of your own to be certain. This can be helpful because it can help you determine which symptoms go with which food. This can come in handy when something mysterious seems to get you.

5. What about flu shots? People with allergies to chicken eggs are usually steered clear of getting a flu shot. I have had one without reaction every year for the last 4 or 5 years... what do you think about me getting a flu shot based on the results?

This is just my opinion, I haven't read anything in this area. But as I understand it, 1 - the flu shot is bypassing the digestive system and 2 - you don't have an egg Allergy, but an Intolerance.

6. With a soy sensitivity, is Soy Lecithin off the list too? I've looked it up and seen conflicting results - this ingredient seems to be in EVERYTHING - even the chewing gum on my desk!

Most people with soy Intolerance report that they can tolerate soy oil and soy lecithin. I have seen a study showing that soy oil does still contain allergenic proteins. So this may not be true for people with Allergies.

7. What about drinking wine? I've read the yeast is dead

Can't help much with yeast. You may become the go-to guy for wine fining and wheat paste sealed barrel questions!

I can say that there seems to be a broad group that advocates minimizing grains and processed foods, gluten free or not at first as a way to heal faster. If you are interested in this, read up on the Paleo or caveman diet.

On the other hand, some recommend pro-biotics and naturally fermented foods along with a paleo type diet.

It seems difficult to do a food challenge for yeast without also challenging some other problematic food. Dr. Joneja has a helpful book on how to conduct food challenges efficiently.

8. What about Goat's Milk?

beats me. The Paleo folks don't recommend any dairy for anybody. Food challenge, I suppose. But it will be awhile before you can do all this. When you first start the diet, things can get a little weird and you can seem to react to just about anything. You'll need to wait until things settle down a bit to feel confident of your challenge results.

9. I am having symptoms where my fingers get stiff and feel hot. Is this connected? I did forget the other day and I had 1/4 of a hard boiled egg that came on a salad before I remembered that I shouldn't eat those anymore.

Hot? how interesting. I've noticed my fingers getting stiff the next morning after eating eggs. Are you keeping a food/symptom log? Saves time in the long run.

10. What do you think my next steps should be? Should I see a GI doctor? An allergist?

Well, that's a tough one. This is just my opinion. The allergist may be able to determine if you can tolerate egg yolks or if you have additional food issues. But the more pressing issue right now is finishing the testing process so you can start the a gluten-free diet. If you've already started, there's not much time, but as far as I can tell you can already quit eating everything else. A GI doc can help you do this if you decide you want or need a formal dx. I would argue that you should attempt a formal dx. Later, if this does not work out, I would seek a doc that would be willing to address the idea of gluten intolerance. Integrative or Functional physicians or one who work with the DAN protocol may be a good fit.

If I am understanding the gene info correctly, you have the DQ6 and DQ7 genes. Here's a post on that topic http://www.celiac.com/gluten-free/index.php?showtopic=35015

Based on this, it seems possible that you have actual celiac rather than "just" gluten intolerance. The cure is basically the same, ie avoid gluten thoroughly, but at this point, celiacs may need additional screening tests, nutritional assessments. If you self-diagnosis it may hamper your ability to get the medical care you need in the future - even basic things like gluten-free meds or gluten-free food should you be hospitalized. Another consideration is your family. What you learn can be be very important to a large group of people.

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No matter what the other tests say, you need to change your diet and then, if you wish, conduct food challenges for each intolerance. Glutamine is one supplement often recommended that you may want to research.

My spouse has every food intolerance that you do (egg yolks and egg whites, casein but not whey) and we've confirmed them all except for whey and yeast. I would still like to test small amounts of egg in baked goods with digestive enzymes. It is a slow process. His symptoms were primarily emotional, and sometimes hard to see until they were gone. It is a lot of work, but there are great days for you ahead.

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Hi - sounds really difficult. Firstly you need a biopsy to confirm celiac disease (I'm amazed that your doctor hasn't recommended it, as your tests indicate celiac disease). If this shows that the villi are really damaged from eating gluten for all those years, then that could also explain why you are having problems with lots of foods. A strict gluten free diet will help to heal your intestines and may also cure you of these other food intolerance's and health issues in the long term. No 1 priority though is to get celiac disease diagnosed, and to then strictly cut out gluten. Once you're on a gluten free diet it could be worth seeing a good natropath to help you get back to health and figure out the best diet.

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