Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):


Join eNewsletter


Celiac.com Sponsor (A1-m):



Join eNewsletter

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Zizzle

Enterolab Tests All Positive!

Food elimination options  

2 members have voted

  1. 1. Should I eliminate all foods suggested by Enterolab?

    • Yes, all sensitive foods for the rest of your life
      0
    • Yes, all sensitive foods until colitis symptoms improves, then only gluten
    • Only eliminate gluten and casein
      0

    • Celiac.com Sponsor (A6):
      Celiac.com Sponsor (A6):



      Celiac.com Sponsors (A6-m):



      Only eliminate gluten
      0
    • Don't do anything until your doctor confirms diagnosis with blood and biopsy
      0
  2. 2. Should I have my children tested by Enterolab?

    • Yes, if they have bothersome GI symptoms
      0
    • Yes, if their growth is slow
      0
    • Yes, even if they seem fine
    • Ask the pediatrician to do blood tests instead
      0
    • Don't bother if they seem OK


Recommended Posts

I'm new to this forum and the celiac disease world. I've had IBS-D for 10 years, unexplained autoantibodies for 5 years, and recently was diagnosed with microscopic colitis. Bloodwork 5 YEARS AGO for Celiac antibodies were negative, so my gastro determined (this year) that I do not have celiac disease and never will, so there was no need to re-test or biopsy! So I did Enterolab tesing on my own. My results are below - basically, I am gluten, casein, yeast and soy sensitive, and I have 2 celiac genes. I am surprised by the number of positive tests and I would like to know, if gluten is my major problem, will a gluten-free diet eventually quell the immune response to dairy, yeast and soy? Will I ever be able to eat cheese or yogurt again?? I'm lactose intolerant do I don't eat much dairy otherwise. Can I at least eat goat's milk cheese and yogurt in moderation without doing damage? Can I eat dark chocolate made with soy lecithin?? Do these results suggest full-blown celiac disease or just intolerance? Should I get a biopsy to confirm or is this enough? Should I get my kids tested if they have no symptoms but are petite for their age?

I've eliminated all these foods for 2 weeks and feel much better, although I still have mild diarrhea. Mild depression, feeling stress in my gut, indigestion, tiredness and bloating are all gone. My autoantibodies were ANA (1:1280), Rheumatoid Factor (27), and Anti-actin/Anti-Smooth Muscle Antibody (57). I've read that ASMA is used as an indicator of the severity of intestinal damage from celiac disease. But my docs think I'm a ticking time-bomb for autoimmune hepatitis, RA or Lupus instead. I'd rather it be celiac disease!

Here are the results:

A) Gluten Sensitivity Stool and Gene Panel Complete

Fecal Anti-gliadin IgA 37 Units (Normal Range is less than 10 Units)

Fecal Anti-tissue Transglutaminase IgA 14 Units (Normal Range is less than 10 Units)

Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score Less than 300 Units (Normal Range is less than 300 Units)

Fecal Anti-casein (cow

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Celiac.com Sponsor (A8):

Celiac.com Sponsor (A8):


Perhaps you should contact Enterolab and ask all your questions. They should be able to provide a false positive rate on their tests and information about how the results can be affected by microscopic colitis and high general levels of inflammation from autoimmunity. (If they can't I'd consider asking for a refund.)

You also need to ask Enterolab about risk stratification of your genetic results. If I'm reading it correctly, you're homozygous DQ2.2, which is not the same degree of risk as heterozygous DQ2.2, DQ2.5 or DR4.

I hate to say it, but with that ANA titer, ASMA, and positive rheumatoid factor, you have something going on other than just celiac. :(

What, exactly, do you think Enterolab tests will tell you about your kids that you won't have to confirm with diet anyway?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've eliminated all these foods for 2 weeks and feel much better, although I still have mild diarrhea. Mild depression, feeling stress in my gut, indigestion, tiredness and bloating are all gone. My autoantibodies were ANA (1:1280), Rheumatoid Factor (27), and Anti-actin/Anti-Smooth Muscle Antibody (57). I've read that ASMA is used as an indicator of the severity of intestinal damage from celiac disease. But my docs think I'm a ticking time-bomb for autoimmune hepatitis, RA or Lupus instead. I'd rather it be celiac disease!

*waves* I'm new too!

I also was diagnosed with Lupus. Don't remember an ASMA, but I had ANA/RF/SED rate all done during two separate flares that finally led to my diagnosis in 2006. It seems a high number of folks with celiac have also been diagnosed with RA/SLE/Chron's/MS - some might have been misdiagnoses, while in other cases, the auto immune diseases seem to be a consequence of unaddressed celiac. As any good rheumatologist will tell you, when your immune system isn't working properly, it's very possible it'll lead to other conditions and/or complications. I myself got the bundle diagnosis of SLE, Fibromyalgia, Sj


Newbie - Trying out the gluten-free diet since 6/08/10.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The enterolab tests are a good starting point for considering what to attempt to eliminate for a trial period. The important test results to consider are how you react to eliminating the products from your diet. Since it's only been 2 weeks and you feel good this certainly means you should consider staying on the diet for an additional couple of months. After 3-4 months on the diet (assuming you're being pretty good about not ingesting hidden sources), try reintroducing a heavy amount of only one of the substances you've been avoiding. If after a month of heavy consumption of that particular item you're still feeling in good spirits and you haven't had any strange symptoms surface or reappear, try adding in one of the other items as well back into your diet. Because gluten potentially has the ability to alter the permeability of your intestines, leaving you open to reactions to a greater variety of compounds, you should leave the reintroduction of gluten till last.


Receiving a qualified diagnosis of Irritable Bowel Syndrome is as useful as a Psychiatrist giving you a diagnosis of "Doesn't Think Right".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites