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Monklady123

Livingston Wine?

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Anyone know about Livingston Wine? It's one of those ordinary California wines, and I've been drinking the white zinfandel. I've always been able to drink this before with no problems, but now suddenly I can't. One glass and I wake up with this horrible headache. It's the same wine as before this whole gluten thing. Same type, same company, etc.

I looked at the list on the Bailey's thread (used to LOVE Bailey's... ) and don't see Livingston specifically. Anyone know?

I have emailed the company and am waiting to hear back but just wondered if anyone here knew.

What did people do in the days before the internet when they needed to know something? lol... :lol:

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Is it just Livingston that's causing it? A lot of celiacs report problems with pretty much any alcohol after going gluten free. I *think* I'm starting to get my ability to drink it back (knock on wood) but for the first year of gluten free, any amount made me feel like crap.

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Anyone know about Livingston Wine? It's one of those ordinary California wines, and I've been drinking the white zinfandel. I've always been able to drink this before with no problems, but now suddenly I can't. One glass and I wake up with this horrible headache. It's the same wine as before this whole gluten thing. Same type, same company, etc.

I looked at the list on the Bailey's thread (used to LOVE Bailey's... ) and don't see Livingston specifically. Anyone know?

I have emailed the company and am waiting to hear back but just wondered if anyone here knew.

What did people do in the days before the internet when they needed to know something? lol... :lol:

There is no gluten in wine so it most likely is the sulfites which are giving you grief. People often notice problems with other substances after going gluten free.

I had problems with dairy crop up after 2 years gluten-free so it does happen. Once your body starts to heal, you may react differently to foods or substances that never seemed to give you a problem before. Headaches are classic with sulfite ingestion.

There are sulfite free wines out there so maybe you might want to try one of those.

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Yes, I know wines don't naturally have gluten but I've read that there can be gluten in the starch-based "glue" that's used on the wooden barrels.

Well, I just got an email from them, and it seems that Livingston is owned by Gallo. lol... And Gallo is on that list.

Yes, it could be the sulfites, although I've never been bothered before. But as you all said, other things can show up after going gluten-free. sigh..

Well, I'm not giving up my once-in-awhile glass of wine so I'll go look for sulfite-free ones.

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Yes, I know wines don't naturally have gluten but I've read that there can be gluten in the starch-based "glue" that's used on the wooden barrels.

Well, I just got an email from them, and it seems that Livingston is owned by Gallo. lol... And Gallo is on that list.

Yes, it could be the sulfites, although I've never been bothered before. But as you all said, other things can show up after going gluten-free. sigh..

Well, I'm not giving up my once-in-awhile glass of wine so I'll go look for sulfite-free ones.

The glue on the wooden barrel idea has been thrown about here on this board and, so far, has never been proven to be true. I highly doubt that there is any merit whatsoever to it as nothing of any kind of warning has been heard from any of the reputable Celiac organizations on this subject and if it were such a problem, someone would have published a warning of some kind....or at least an article of mention.

I have seen quite a few of the sulfite free wines at the liquor stores in my area so you should be able to find some without too much trouble. I wouldn't give up the wine either....and I drink more often than once in a while! ;)

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Yes, I know wines don't naturally have gluten but I've read that there can be gluten in the starch-based "glue" that's used on the wooden barrels.

Well, I just got an email from them, and it seems that Livingston is owned by Gallo. lol... And Gallo is on that list.

Yes, it could be the sulfites, although I've never been bothered before. But as you all said, other things can show up after going gluten-free. sigh..

Well, I'm not giving up my once-in-awhile glass of wine so I'll go look for sulfite-free ones.

I think the only wooden barrels around Gallo are decorations at the door to the corporate office. :)


 

 

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I think the only wooden barrels around Gallo are decorations at the door to the corporate office. :)

Lol... probably true. Wooden barrels seems kind of old-fashioned anyway, although I'm sure the high-class French wineries use them still. lol... My wine leans more in the direction of a twist-off top, so any vat would probably do. :lol:

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Since going gluten-free, I've found one or two glasses of wine can feel like four or five glasses. Someone suggested to me that it's because as a gluten-free person, you're not eating the pastas and breads WITH your wine to help soak it up... anyway, just a thought.

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I am really hyper sensitive and a big wine drinker so I have been through some of those things you describe.

1. Some companies *do* seal their barrels with gluten. However since you wrote that it has changed I doubt that is the cause, most companies rarely change barreling companies.

Ex StaVin seal their barrels with a flour paste .

http://www.stavin.com/barrelsystems/insert.htm

2. The more likely reason is that the company has changed their clarifying process. Usually all wine is clarified with animal product that are filtered off. Research made 2002 and 2003? (I think it was something like that) showed that wheat gluten could be used as a clarifying agent but the availability commercial gluten clarifies has been low until now. However if they want to switch their wines to vegetarian or possibly kosher wines gluten would be an attractive choice.

If you belong to the group of people who, against all better judgment, still can't drink distilled spirits made from grains and can drink distilled spirits made from 100% agave/corn/potatoes a switch to a gluten based clarifying agent could be the cause.

Resent Italian research has shown that gliadin levels in red wine should be undetectable with the methods used today but the report was unsure white wines.

Hope this helps.

// Marcus

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