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shawnandjessm

Do I Have Celiac Disease?

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Did your doctor do a total IGA? If that is low then it would produce a false negative in the IGA tests. You do have a high result for the IGG so after you are done with all celiac related testing, including the endo if you are going to have it, then go ahead and do a strict trial of the diet. While false negatives are common in blood tests false positives are not.


Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying

"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)

Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002

Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis

All bold resoved or went into remission in time with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002

 Gene Test Aug 2007

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

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Thanks for the reply! I did not get a total IGA. I see the doctor on Tuesday so we'll see what he says, although I'm pregnant so can't do the endo at this point. Is there a reason to do the gluten free diet if the doctor doesn't think I have celiac disease and I'm not showing any problems or symptoms? I just had the test because my sister was diagnosed.

Also, I was wondering about the endomysial IGA. Since there is a number there is that a positive result, or is it low enough to be considered negative? Thank you.

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In my opinion since you do have a positive result you need to be on the diet. Do also post in the pregnacy section to get the advice of others but since undiagnosed celiac can be linked to miscarriages IMHO it would be best to be gluten free. After the baby is born then you can do a gluten challenge for 3 months or so and get retested. Since you already have a positive result there is a good chance that your symptoms may get worse after the baby is born. Childbirth is often a trigger for celiac or causes our symptoms to become more obvious.


Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying

"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)

Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002

Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis

All bold resoved or went into remission in time with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002

 Gene Test Aug 2007

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

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I saw the doctor today and he said since it is mildly positive he wouldn't worry about it. He said next time I have labwork for my pregnancy to have them retest, and see if the numbers are similar.

I really have to disagree with your doctor. Being a little bit in the positive range is like being a little in the positive range in a pregnacy test.


Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying

"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)

Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002

Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis

All bold resoved or went into remission in time with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002

 Gene Test Aug 2007

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

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  • IgG antibodies do cross the placenta.
  • You are producing IgG at least for gliadin
  • The fetus will carry at least one of your HLA allelles
  • HLA seems involved in this cross reaction
  • Science has only poorly defined the antibodies being produced
  • There is a strong association with miscarriages

Why not play it safe and go gluten free through pregnancy and breast feeding?

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