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pricklypear1971

Iron Supplements - Queasy Feeling?

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Ok, took my first iron supplement today. Now I want to hurl. It's Solgar Gentle Iron 25 mg - gluten free.

I read they can make you queasy but this is GROSS. I honestly just want to puke and get it over with. I can't take it at night because I can't take it with calcium and that's when I take my cal/mag and quite honestly I don't know if it would solve the problem.

Anyone else get sick from iron??? Does it go away???

I'd volunteer for the iron shots now. Seriously.

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Ok, took my first iron supplement today. Now I want to hurl. It's Solgar Gentle Iron 25 mg - gluten free.

I read they can make you queasy but this is GROSS. I honestly just want to puke and get it over with. I can't take it at night because I can't take it with calcium and that's when I take my cal/mag and quite honestly I don't know if it would solve the problem.

Anyone else get sick from iron??? Does it go away???

I'd volunteer for the iron shots now. Seriously.

Yeah...many people have a difficult time with iron. Gives me the "ickies" just thinking about it. Can you substitute the pills for iron rich foods?

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I'm on the fence. I see organ meats listed as high iodine - and I can't do high iodine right now, DH.

That's why I chose the supplement, above - it's vegetable source and I assume lower in iodone.

I'll give it a few more days.

And quite frankly I've never been able to choke down organ meats.

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Pasted from a MedWeb reference. You have options.

High-in-Iron Food Sources

Very good sources of heme iron, with 3.5 milligrams or more per serving, include:

* 3 ounces of beef or chicken liver

* 3 ounces of clams or mollusks

* 3 ounces of oysters

Good sources of heme iron, with 2.1 milligrams or more per serving, include:

* 3 ounces of cooked beef

* 3 ounces of canned sardines, canned in oil

* 3 ounces of cooked turkey

Other sources of heme iron, with 0.7 milligrams or more per serving, include:

* 3 ounces of chicken

* 3 ounces of halibut, haddock, perch, salmon, or tuna

* 3 ounces of ham

* 3 ounces of veal

Iron in plant foods such as lentils, beans, and spinach is nonheme iron. This is the form of iron added to iron-enriched and iron-fortified foods. Our bodies are less efficient at absorbing nonheme iron, but most dietary iron is nonheme iron.

Very good sources of nonheme iron, with 3.5 milligrams or more per serving, include:

* Breakfast cereals enriched with iron

* One cup of cooked beans

* One-half cup of tofu

* 1 ounce of pumpkin, sesame, or squash seeds

Good sources of nonheme iron, with 2.1 milligrams or more per serving, include:

* One-half cup of canned lima beans, red kidney beans, chickpeas, or split peas

* One cup of dried apricots

* One medium baked potato

* One medium stalk of broccoli

* One cup of cooked enriched egg noodles

* One-fourth cup of wheat germ

Other sources of nonheme iron, with 0.7 milligrams or more, include:

* 1 ounce of peanuts, pecans, walnuts, pistachios, roasted almonds, roasted cashews, or sunflower seeds

* One-half cup of dried seedless raisins, peaches, or prunes

* One cup of spinach

* One medium green pepper

* One cup of pasta

* One slice of bread, pumpernickel bagel, or bran muffin

* One cup of rice

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Pasted from a MedWeb reference. You have options.

High-in-Iron Food Sources

Very good sources of heme iron, with 3.5 milligrams or more per serving, include:

* 3 ounces of beef or chicken liver

* 3 ounces of clams or mollusks

* 3 ounces of oysters

Good sources of heme iron, with 2.1 milligrams or more per serving, include:

* 3 ounces of cooked beef

* 3 ounces of canned sardines, canned in oil

* 3 ounces of cooked turkey

Other sources of heme iron, with 0.7 milligrams or more per serving, include:

* 3 ounces of chicken

* 3 ounces of halibut, haddock, perch, salmon, or tuna

* 3 ounces of ham

* 3 ounces of veal

Iron in plant foods such as lentils, beans, and spinach is nonheme iron. This is the form of iron added to iron-enriched and iron-fortified foods. Our bodies are less efficient at absorbing nonheme iron, but most dietary iron is nonheme iron.

Very good sources of nonheme iron, with 3.5 milligrams or more per serving, include:

* Breakfast cereals enriched with iron

* One cup of cooked beans

* One-half cup of tofu

* 1 ounce of pumpkin, sesame, or squash seeds

Good sources of nonheme iron, with 2.1 milligrams or more per serving, include:

* One-half cup of canned lima beans, red kidney beans, chickpeas, or split peas

* One cup of dried apricots

* One medium baked potato

* One medium stalk of broccoli

* One cup of cooked enriched egg noodles

* One-fourth cup of wheat germ

Other sources of nonheme iron, with 0.7 milligrams or more, include:

* 1 ounce of peanuts, pecans, walnuts, pistachios, roasted almonds, roasted cashews, or sunflower seeds

* One-half cup of dried seedless raisins, peaches, or prunes

* One cup of spinach

* One medium green pepper

* One cup of pasta

* One slice of bread, pumpernickel bagel, or bran muffin

* One cup of rice

Lol, I can add the non-seafood (just ate a baked potato) - ironically iron and iodine seem to overlap. A baked potato is pushing it, unfortunately. I eat meat...and nuts...lots of it.

Thanks for posting this!

Sigh, miss seafood. I could go for a dozen raw gulf oysters right now.

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It's time for another iron pill.

Gag.

If I get queasy again I'm switching around the cal/mag and taking the iron at night.

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