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Nutrients For Neuropathy

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"Nutrients for Neuropathy" by John A. Senneff:

{Even if we were more careful as to what we eat and even if all the foods we consume retained all the nutrients nature intended to be there and even if all the RDIs were fully met, the nutrients we take in would still not be enough for many of us. Example, a boiled egg supplies .7 micrograms of vitamin B12; it is widely believed that 1000 micrograms should be taken daily for peripheral neuropathy. Genetic factors, age, stress, smoking and drinking habits, existing defieciencies, or disease prevention, all make nutrient supplementation necessary.

The emphasis is on those vitamins for which there is incredible scientific evidence that can provide neuropathy benefits. The group referred to a the B complex is a set of 12 somewhat related substances which because of their water-solubility must be regularly replaced. Together, the B vitamins have a braod range of functions. These include maintainance of myeli, which is thecoveriung around nerve fobers. A breakdown of myelin can cause large and devastating variety of neurological symptoms such as peripheral neuropathy.

B1- vital for normal development of skin and hair, blood production and immune functions. The key importance of vitamin B1 is its ability to synthesize an important neurotransmiutter in the nervous system that allows nerve impulses to travel from one nerve to another.

B2- also known as riboflavin, is important in the production of body energy. A deficiency can result in nerve disorders and a degeneration of myelin sheaths. It works closely with folic acid, B5 and B12.

B3- or niacin, is often used to reduce high chlorestol levels and treat high blood pressure, acne, and acoholism.

B5- or pantothenic acid, is considered one of the best energy enhancing vitamins and is also valued for its anti-inflammatory properties. The vitamin also activates the adrenal glands.

B6- or pyridoxine, is important in manufacturing prostaglandins, which are oxygenated unsaturated cyclic fatty acids that have a variety of hormone-like actions such as assisting in the transport of oxygen in the blood stream. High doses of B6 can be toxic and can cause peripheral neuropathy.

B12- In addition to the metobolism of nerve tissue, vitamin B12 helps guard against stroke and heart disease and is said to contribute to relief from asthma, depression, chronic fatigue, Alzheimer's and low blood pressure. Studies have demonstarted that aggressive B12 therapy eases pain fromfrom nerve damage. Deficiencies of the vitamin can directly lead to peripheral neuropathy.

Biotin- is essential for cell growth and replication. There is evidence that large doses can be eefective in improving nerve conduction and relieving pain from neuropathy, specifically painful muscle cramps, paresthesias, ability to stand, walk and climb stairs, and disappearance of restless leg syndrome.

Folate- Among patients with severe folate deficiency, peripheral neuropathy was one of the most common complications, following depression and dementia.

Inositol- is a constituent of cell membranes and plays a role in helping the liver process fats as well as contribruting to the function of muscles and nerves.

Choline and Lecithin- contribute to the production of myelin, the covering that protects nerves. There is also some evidence that these nutrients can be helpful in treating various neurological disorders such as Parkinson's, Alheimer's, and Tourettes.

C- one of its principal functions is to help the body manufacture colagen, an imortant protein for connective tissues, cartilage, and tendons.

E-sustains normal neurological processes.

Magnesium- is necessary for nerve conduction and for anaerobic breakdown of glucose. Deficiencies of magnesium often occur in conjunction with a predisposing disease state such as chronic alcolholism, renal dysfunction, or following the use of certain medications. Certain diuretcis, estrogen and oral contraceptives, zinc, potassium and manganese all may increase magnesium requirements.

Selenium- is a powerful antioxident. Additionally it serves as a constituent of the enzymes which interact with vitamin E in preventing free radical from stealing eletrons away from healthy cells. Selenium also reinforces the body's immune defenses. Moreover it has anti-inflammaory properties when taken inconjunction with vitamin E.

Zinc- functions in over 200 enzymatic reactions in the body. It is necessary for the production of brain neuro-transmitters. Deficiency of zinc is said to lead to impaired conduction and nerve damage.

Alpha Lipoic Acid- useful for sensory and autonomic neuropathy.}

The book itself was a little hard to read. It has alot of medical terms and tons of references and explained experiements so getting stright forward information from the boo was hard to weed thru to get. However, the above vitamins and minerals were indicated to help alieviate pain associated with neuropathy symptoms. The Omegas were also lsited as beneficial. L-carntine is debatable as far as the book is concerned. I take it and find it benefits me in releiving the pins and needles pain I will get. Another one that was listed as debatable was lithium.

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I can tell when I return to the Neuro I need to have him write me some Rxs for supplements I am out of...sometimes I get soooo tired of taking all the pills! Been having more trouble with the neuropathy (pins & needles) in my hands; the muscle spasms and pain in my feet are also increased....time to get more supplements! Thank you!

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"Nutrients for Neuropathy" by John A. Senneff:

{Even if we were more careful as to what we eat and even if all the foods we consume retained all the nutrients nature intended to be there and even if all the RDIs were fully met, the nutrients we take in would still not be enough for many of us. Example, a boiled egg supplies .7 micrograms of vitamin B12; it is widely believed that 1000 micrograms should be taken daily for peripheral neuropathy. Genetic factors, age, stress, smoking and drinking habits, existing defieciencies, or disease prevention, all make nutrient supplementation necessary.

The emphasis is on those vitamins for which there is incredible scientific evidence that can provide neuropathy benefits. The group referred to a the B complex is a set of 12 somewhat related substances which because of their water-solubility must be regularly replaced. Together, the B vitamins have a braod range of functions. These include maintainance of myeli, which is thecoveriung around nerve fobers. A breakdown of myelin can cause large and devastating variety of neurological symptoms such as peripheral neuropathy.

B1- vital for normal development of skin and hair, blood production and immune functions. The key importance of vitamin B1 is its ability to synthesize an important neurotransmiutter in the nervous system that allows nerve impulses to travel from one nerve to another.

B2- also known as riboflavin, is important in the production of body energy. A deficiency can result in nerve disorders and a degeneration of myelin sheaths. It works closely with folic acid, B5 and B12.

B3- or niacin, is often used to reduce high chlorestol levels and treat high blood pressure, acne, and acoholism.

B5- or pantothenic acid, is considered one of the best energy enhancing vitamins and is also valued for its anti-inflammatory properties. The vitamin also activates the adrenal glands.

B6- or pyridoxine, is important in manufacturing prostaglandins, which are oxygenated unsaturated cyclic fatty acids that have a variety of hormone-like actions such as assisting in the transport of oxygen in the blood stream. High doses of B6 can be toxic and can cause peripheral neuropathy.

B12- In addition to the metobolism of nerve tissue, vitamin B12 helps guard against stroke and heart disease and is said to contribute to relief from asthma, depression, chronic fatigue, Alzheimer's and low blood pressure. Studies have demonstarted that aggressive B12 therapy eases pain fromfrom nerve damage. Deficiencies of the vitamin can directly lead to peripheral neuropathy.

Biotin- is essential for cell growth and replication. There is evidence that large doses can be eefective in improving nerve conduction and relieving pain from neuropathy, specifically painful muscle cramps, paresthesias, ability to stand, walk and climb stairs, and disappearance of restless leg syndrome.

Folate- Among patients with severe folate deficiency, peripheral neuropathy was one of the most common complications, following depression and dementia.

Inositol- is a constituent of cell membranes and plays a role in helping the liver process fats as well as contribruting to the function of muscles and nerves.

Choline and Lecithin- contribute to the production of myelin, the covering that protects nerves. There is also some evidence that these nutrients can be helpful in treating various neurological disorders such as Parkinson's, Alheimer's, and Tourettes.

C- one of its principal functions is to help the body manufacture colagen, an imortant protein for connective tissues, cartilage, and tendons.

E-sustains normal neurological processes.

Magnesium- is necessary for nerve conduction and for anaerobic breakdown of glucose. Deficiencies of magnesium often occur in conjunction with a predisposing disease state such as chronic alcolholism, renal dysfunction, or following the use of certain medications. Certain diuretcis, estrogen and oral contraceptives, zinc, potassium and manganese all may increase magnesium requirements.

Selenium- is a powerful antioxident. Additionally it serves as a constituent of the enzymes which interact with vitamin E in preventing free radical from stealing eletrons away from healthy cells. Selenium also reinforces the body's immune defenses. Moreover it has anti-inflammaory properties when taken inconjunction with vitamin E.

Zinc- functions in over 200 enzymatic reactions in the body. It is necessary for the production of brain neuro-transmitters. Deficiency of zinc is said to lead to impaired conduction and nerve damage.

Alpha Lipoic Acid- useful for sensory and autonomic neuropathy.}

The book itself was a little hard to read. It has alot of medical terms and tons of references and explained experiements so getting stright forward information from the boo was hard to weed thru to get. However, the above vitamins and minerals were indicated to help alieviate pain associated with neuropathy symptoms. The Omegas were also lsited as beneficial. L-carntine is debatable as far as the book is concerned. I take it and find it benefits me in releiving the pins and needles pain I will get. Another one that was listed as debatable was lithium.

This is wonderful information. Thank you for posting it!

It reminds me I should probably be taking lecithin to help beef up my myelin sheath situation. Thanks!

Also wanted to note that vitamin B1 also helps protein and carbohydrate absorption. I am aware of this since I tend to be low in B1--as is my mother. This is why I started to take the co-enzyme B complex as well as take extra biotin now and most of the other supplements you listed. I noticed a huge improvement after taking the co-enzyme B's after just two weeks. My heart stopped racing as it was want to do at that time. This was before I went off all the trace gluten. It still helps me, so I keep taking the co-enzyme complex. It is far more absorbable than regular b complex since it goes directly into the blood stream, bypassing the often stressed and overtaxed liver.

I probably should be taking extra selenium again.

For the biotin I took small amounts at first and gradually increased the dosage to 1000 mcg. It was too much for me to just go to 1000 mcg.s all at once. Its in my b complex, but there wasn't enough of it IMHO. Someone on the salicylate forum suggested it and I haven't been sorry. I seem actually to have improved a little neurologically, so I think its been doing something.

Bea

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