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A Possible Connection To Celiac Disease And Related Disorders

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I think I may know why celiac patients have an increased risk of developing other related disorders such as lupus, fibromyalgia, Sjogren's, RA,lymphoma,hypothyroidism, etc. I believe that these other disorders are due to an inability to digest other proteins, in addition to gluten. This is due, I believe, to a lack of pancreatic enzymes called protease and DNase1. You can trace every symptom of these diseases and every valid scientific finding of these diseases back to these missing enzymes.

We can use some of the findings in fibromyalgia as an example. Dr. Wood is the current scientific advisor for the Fibromyalgia Association of America. His findings in fibromyalgia are low dopamine, low iron, spinal cord changes and autonomic nervous system dysfunction. All of these findings can be traced directly back to these enzymes.

First-low iron. Protease regulate iron absorption in the body. Here is the title and conclusion to a study that confirms this.

"New Insights Into Intestinal Iron Absorption

H

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4th-Autonomic nervous system dysfunction. The two neurotransmitters that control the ANS are adrenaline and acetylcholine. Adrenaline is derived from dopamine.( The lack of dopamine is due to a lack of phenylalanine.) Acetylcholine is derived from choline and choline is synthesized from vitamin B12. The lack of phenylalanine (essential amino acid derived from high protein foods) and B12 would explain the ANS dysfunction in fibromyalgia.

This can be done in just this way with every single symptom and every valid scientific finding in all of the associated diseases with celiac disease. I can even show very clearly why there would be an increased risk of lymphoma and other cancers. If anyone has a question about why they are experiencing a certain symptom in these associated disorders, just ask and I will clearly show why it is happening and its association with these enzymes from the pancreas.

I don't have fibromyalgia, but I have autonomic dysfunction with postprandial hypotention and milder POTS- postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome. It took me 2 years (many doctors visits and tests) to find out what I have. The last doctor prescribed for me Mestinon, which is medicine to "cure " myasthenia gravis.

http://www.drugs.com/pro/mestinon.html Mestinon (pyridostigmine bromide) is an orally active cholinesterase inhibitor. or in

http://en.wikipedia..../Pyridostigmine - can be used for POTS (in my case). Pyridostigmine is a parasympathomimetic (which are chemicals also called cholinergic drugs because acetylcholine is the neurotransmitter used by the PSNS) and a reversible cholinesterase inhibitor (An acetylcholinesterase inhibitor or anti-cholinesterase is a chemical that inhibits the cholinesterase enzyme from breaking down acetylcholine, increasing both the level and duration of action of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine).

The pills work for me. This means that I have problem with acetylcholine, or choline, if the medicine is working for me?

edited- deleted

I didn't wrote the questions on the bottom to be diagnozed by another poster. I was thinking alovd, so I deleted them to avoid problems. I was thinking about it myself for a longer time and this post is just something that showed me that I was on a right track. If the medicine is working for my problem, I think it means that I provably have problem with choline, or acetylcholine. My last b12 level was 362 from 0-1200 ref. range. Maybe by taking suplements, I will help to lessen my symptoms?

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I would like to see a Moderator step in here before the OP starts to diagnose the second poster. This is clearly wrong.

If I am out of line on this, please tell me and I will not say another word.

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Hi Simona19~

That is interesting that you were given a medicine for myasthenia gravis for your autonomic dysfunction. Myasthenia gravis is caused "in part" by a lack of acetylcholine. This is one reason why I believe these diseases are connected and originate with protease and DNase1. During WW II, the development of myasthenia gravis in prisoners of war

in Singapore was attributed to malnutrition. It is reported that a nutritious

diet, with high vitamin content and plenty of liver, soon restored these

prisoners to normal. Excess B12 is stored in our livers, so liver is one of the

foods that contain the highest levels of B12. The fact that they recovered by

eating liver shows they were able to properly digest the protein and simply

lacked B12. In you lack protease and are unable to break down proteins, however, eating a lot of liver that you

are not able to properly digest would just exacerbate the illness.

Personally, I would use caution in supplementation with B12. A large study done in Norway that supplemented heart disease patients with folic acid and B12 found a 38% increased risk of cancer. Here is some information on this study.

http://coloncancer.about.com/b/2009/11/21/folic-acid-and-b12-supplements-increase-cancer-risk.htm

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Check this video, specially around 28 minut where Dr. Svetlana speaks about Mestinon. Today I have another bad day, I had chills for hour and later found myself asleep for prox. 90 minutes, so I can't write. Everything is explained in this video.

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Hi Simona19~I did watch the video.I think people would be surprised to learn that autonomic dysfunction is a common feature of autoimmune disease. As Dr. Wood has discovered it is a main feature of fibromyalgia. Here is a study that shows it is involved in MS.I'll just post the title and conclusion.

Autonomic Dysfunction in Multiple Sclerosis: Correlation with

Disease-Related Parameters

Gunal, D.I., N. Afsar, T. Tanridag, S. Aktan. 2002. Eur Neurol. 48(1):1-5.

"Both parasympathetic and sympathetic functions were impaired and this could have been easily overlooked by a standard EDSS follow-up. In this regard, autonomic function testing seems necessary in order to detect subclinical changes in MS patients and should be considered in outcome measures."

Here is one on lupus and RA.

Cardiac Autonomic Dysfunction in Patients with Systemic Lupus,

Rheumatoid Arthritis and Sudden Death Risk

Milovanovi, B., L. Stojanovi, N. Milievik, K. Vasi, B. Bjelakovi, M. Krotin . 2010.

Conclusion: SLE and RA are associated with severe autonomic dysfunction and the

presence of significant risk predictors related to the onset of sudden cardiac death.

Here is one on Sjogrens.

Autonomic Nervous Symptoms in Primary Sj

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According to the Wm.K. Warren Medical Research Center for Celiac Disease, autonomic dysfunction is also a common finding in celiac disease. Here is a study on autonomic dysfunction and gastrointestinal hypomotility in celiac disease.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9466129

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As the study I posted previously shows, protease are necessary for the proper metabolism of vitamin B12. Therefore, if a lack of protease is directly involved in autoimmune disease, we would expect to find that autoimmune patients lack vitamin B12. Here are some study titles in MS that confirm this.

"Multiple Sclerosis Associated with Vitamin B12 Deficiency"

"Vitamin B12 Metabolism in Multiple Sclerosis"

"Vitamin B12 and its Relationship to Age of Onset of Multiple Sclerosis"

Here is one on Sjogrens.

"Sjogrens Syndrome Associated with Vitamin B12 Deficiency"

And one on Hypothyroidism.

"Vitamin B12 Deficiency Common in Primary Hypothyroidism"

Studies show that patients with RA, lupus, diabetes, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, celiac disease etc. all lack vitamin B12. An inability to metabolize vitamin B12 can be very serious. It will lead to subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord, ANS dysfunction, white matter lesions, high homocysteine etc.

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Thank you for the info. I was tested for every illness that you have mentioned, and the result was negative in every case. I'm very happy for that. Only thing that is bothering me is autonomic dysfunction that I got after upper respiratory infection- viral.

I remembered one post that I have posted before: http://www.celiac.com/gluten-free/topic/88905-the-reason-for-ibs/page__p__764561__fromsearch__1#entry764561

One cardiologist told me that he thinks that I have problem with norepinephrine levels and I should take Prozac. The side effect

of this medicine is the elevation of serotonin-norepinephrine levels, but the other side effects are very scary. My neurologist told me that Prozac would be more damaging than helpful in my case. Mastinon works better, but I must follow very strict regime.

My grandma always told me when I was growing up that when you loose vitamins, you will get very sick. She pointed to a neighbor house and asked us, if we see how Ludmila is walking. She was a very young women diagnosed with ms. We were scared and ate everything. I believe that vitamins and minerals are very important and that long term deficiencies can cause irreversible damage.

Currently I'm taking just magnesium 400mg daily. I don't want to take b12 because it will force me to eat and I have bad reaction from food. I will ask my doctor about it. For now I will increase the meat intake in my diet. I need to do it anyway. I should eat meat 3-4 times per day to stop postprandial hypotension.

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