Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):


Join eNewsletter


Celiac.com Sponsor (A1-m):



Join eNewsletter
  • Join Our Community!

    Ask us a question in our celiac / gluten-free forum.

  • Scott Adams

    Forbidden Gluten Food List (Unsafe Ingredients)

    Scott Adams
    4 4
    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

      This list focuses on unsafe/forbidden foods and ingredients (non-gluten-free) for those with celiac disease (USA and Canada)


    Image: CC--Steve Snodgrass
    Caption: Image: CC--Steve Snodgrass

    This is a list of unsafe and forbidden ingredients for those who have celiac disease. We keep it up to date, and feel free to use the comment field below to suggest any changes or additions.

    A
    Abyssinian Hard (Wheat triticum durum)
    Alcohol (Spirits - Specific Types)
    Atta Flour



    Celiac.com Sponsor (A12):






    Celiac.com Sponsor (A12-m):




    B
    Barley Grass (can contain seeds)
    Barley Hordeum vulgare
    Barley Malt
    Beer (most contain barley or wheat)
    Bleached Flour
    Bran (wheat, rye or barley bran)
    Bread Flour
    Brewer's Yeast
    Brown Flour
    Bulgur (Bulgar Wheat/Nuts)
    Bulgur Wheat

    C
    Cereal Binding
    Chilton
    Club Wheat (Triticum aestivum subspecies compactum)
    Common Wheat (Triticum aestivum)
    Cookie Crumbs
    Cookie Dough
    Cookie Dough Pieces
    Couscous
    Criped Rice

    D
    Dinkle (Spelt)
    Disodium Wheatgermamido Peg-2 Sulfosuccinate
    Durum wheat (Triticum durum)

    E
    Edible Coatings
    Edible Films
    Edible Starch
    Einkorn (Triticum monococcum)
    Emmer (Triticum dicoccon)
    Enriched Bleached Flour
    Enriched Bleached Wheat Flour
    Enriched Flour

    F
    Farik
    Farina
    Farina Graham
    Farro
    Filler
    Flour (normally this is wheat)
    Freekeh
    Frikeh
    Fu (dried wheat gluten)

    G
    Germ (wheat, rye or barley bran)
    Graham Flour
    Granary Flour
    Groats (barley, wheat)

    H
    Hard Wheat
    Heeng
    Hing
    Hordeum Chilense (Wild Barley)
    Hordeum Vulgare Extract
    Hydroxypropyltrimonium Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein

    K
    Kamut (Pasta wheat)
    Kecap Manis (Soy Sauce)
    Ketjap Manis (Soy Sauce)
    Kluski Pasta

    M
    Maida (Indian wheat flour)
    Malt
    Malted Barley Flour
    Malted Milk
    Malt Extract
    Malt Syrup
    Malt Flavoring
    Malt Vinegar
    Macha Wheat (Triticum aestivum)
    Matza
    Matzah
    Matzo
    Matzo Semolina
    Meripro 711
    Mir

    N
    Nishasta

    O
    Oriental Wheat (Triticum turanicum)
    Orzo Pasta

    P
    Pasta
    Pearl Barley
    Persian Wheat (Triticum carthlicum)
    Perungayam
    Poulard Wheat (Triticum turgidum)
    Polish Wheat (Triticum polonicum)

    R
    Rice Malt (if barley or Koji are used)
    Roux
    Rusk
    Rye

    S
    Seitan
    Semolina
    Semolina Triticum
    Shot Wheat (Triticum aestivum)
    Small Spelt
    Spirits (Specific Types)
    Spelt (Triticum spelta)
    Sprouted Wheat or Barley
    Stearyldimoniumhydroxypropyl Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein
    Strong Flour
    Suet in Packets

    T
    Tabbouleh
    Tabouli
    Teriyaki Sauce
    Timopheevi Wheat (Triticum timopheevii)
    Triticale X triticosecale
    Triticum Durum (Durum Wheat)
    Triticum Vulgare (Wheat) Flour Lipids
    Triticum Vulgare (Wheat) Germ Extract
    Triticum Vulgare (Wheat) Germ Oil
    Tritordeum (combination of durum wheat - Triticum Durum - and wild barley (Hordeum Chilense)

    U
    Udon (wheat noodles)
    Unbleached Flour

    V
    Vavilovi Wheat (Triticum aestivum)
    Vital Wheat Gluten

    W
    Wheat, Abyssinian Hard triticum durum
    Wheat Amino Acids
    Wheat Bran Extract
    Wheat, Bulgur
    Wheat Durum Triticum
    Wheat Germ Extract
    Wheat Germ Glycerides
    Wheat Germ Oil
    Wheat Germamidopropyldimonium Hydroxypropyl Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein
    Wheat Grass (can contain seeds)
    Wheat Nuts
    Wheat Protein
    Wheat Starch
    Wheat Triticum aestivum
    Wheat Triticum Monococcum
    Wheat (Triticum Vulgare) Bran Extract
    Whole-Meal Flour
    Wild Barley (Hordeum Chilense)
    Wild Einkorn (Triticum boeotictim)
    Wild Emmer (Triticum dicoccoides)

    The following items may or may not contain gluten depending on where and how they are made, and it is sometimes necessary to check with the manufacturer to find out:

    • Amp-Isostearoyl Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein2
    • Artificial Color2
    • Baking Powder2
    • Clarifying Agents2
    • Coloring2
    • Dry Roasted Nuts2
    • Emulsifiers2
    • Enzymes2
    • Fat Replacer2
    • Gravy Cubes2
    • Ground Spices2
    • Hydrolyzed Wheat Gluten2
    • Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein2
    • Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein Pg-Propyl Silanetriol2
    • Hydrolyzed Wheat Starch2
    • Hydrogenated Starch Hydrolysate2
    • Hydroxypropylated Starch2
    • Miso2
    • Natural Juices2
    • Non-dairy Creamer2
    • Pregelatinized Starch2
    • Protein Hydrolysates2
    • Seafood Analogs2
    • Seasonings2
    • Sirimi2
    • Soba Noodles2
    • Soy Sauce2
    • Soy Sauce Extract2
    • Soy Sauce Solids2
    • Sphingolipids2
    • Stabilizers2
    • Starch1, 2
    • Stock Cubes2
    • Suet2
    • Tocopherols2
    • Vegetable Broth2
    • Vegetable Gum2
    • Vegetable Protein2
    • Vegetable Starch2
    • Vitamins2
    • 1) If this ingredient is made in North America it is likely to be gluten-free.
    • 2) Can utilize a gluten-containing grain or by-product in the manufacturing process, or as an ingredient.

    Edited by Scott Adams

    4 4

    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments



    1 hour ago, kristine4727 said:

    I have been using this list since being diagnosed with celiac a week ago. My question is, is this list updated regularly?

    Thank you!

    We have updated it .  But there isn’t a lot to update - it’s not like spelt will suddenly not be wheat.  It isn’t meant to list every product currently made.  You need to read ingredients and these are things to look for.  
     

    Did you have a specific question?

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    3 minutes ago, kareng said:

    We have updated it .  But there isn’t a lot to update - it’s not like spelt will suddenly not be wheat.  It isn’t meant to list every product currently made.  You need to read ingredients and these are things to look for.  
     

    Did you have a specific question?

    I read the ingredients on everything now. The reason I asked is because yeast extract wasn’t on there or torula yeast. Maybe that is a no brainer.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest coffeemallow

    Posted

    I may be in the wrong sector, so please re-direct me as needed.  I read a Blog post from Skylark on Entero Lab testing, and found it helpful.  I am wondering if Skylark, or anyone, has information on Cyrex Labs' food sensitivity testing?  And, as my sensitivities have seemed to multiply on my gluten-free diet, does anyone have experience with, or knowledge of, available dietary guidance that they trust?  Thank you for any info available,

    coffeemallow

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites



    Guest
    This is now closed for further comments

  • About Me

    Scott Adams was diagnosed with celiac disease in 1994, and, due to the nearly total lack of information available at that time, was forced to become an expert on the disease in order to recover. In 1995 he launched the site that later became Celiac.com to help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives.  He is co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of the (formerly paper) newsletter Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. In 1998 he founded The Gluten-Free Mall which he sold in 2014. Celiac.com does not sell any products, and is 100% advertiser supported.


  • Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):
    Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):





    Celiac.com Sponsors (A17-m):




  • Related Articles

    Scott Adams
    Celiac.com's safe food and ingredient list has been compiled and maintained for nearly 25 years. We keep the list updated with any additions or changes. Feel free to comment below if you believe something should be added to it.
    A
    Acacia Gum
    Acesulfame K
    Acesulfame Potassium
    Acetanisole
    Acetophenone
    Acorn Quercus
    Adipic Acid
    Adzuki Bean
    Acacia Gum
    Agar
    Agave
    Ajinomoto (msg)
    Albumen
    Alcohol (Distilled Spirits)
    Alfalfa
    Algae
    Algin
    Alginic Acid
    Alginate
    Alkalized Cocoa
    Allicin
    Almond Nut
    Alpha-amylase
    Alpha-lactalbumin
    Aluminum...

    Scott Adams
    Rice and soy beverages because their production process may utilize barley enzymes. Bad advice from health food store employees (i.e., that spelt and/or kamut is/are safe for celiacs). Cross-contamination between food store bins selling raw flours and grains (usually via the scoops). Wheat-bread crumbs in butter, jams, toaster, counter, etc. Lotions, creams and cosmetics (primarily for those with dermatitis herpetaformis). Toothpaste and mouthwash. Medicines: many contain gluten. Cereals: most contain malt flavoring, or some other non-gluten-free ingredient. Some brands of rice paper. Sauce...

    Scott Adams
    Celiac.com 06/05/2020 (Updated. originally published 02/20/2015) - There's a lot of confusion about which alcoholic beverages are gluten-free, and safe for people with celiac disease. Here's Celiac.com's latest list of gluten-free, gluten-safe beer, wine and alcohol.
    Gluten-Free Beer
    In the United States, products labeled gluten-free must not contain or be made from wheat, rye or barley. That means many beers cannot be labeled gluten-free. Beers made with gluten-free ingredients and are gluten-free and can be labeled gluten-free.
    Gluten-Removed Beer
    A number of beers are treated with enzymes to break down gluten. These b...

    Megan Tichy Ph.D.
    What is Gluten?
    Gluten is a huge molecule held together by smaller molecules linked together called amino acids. A very tiny part of the gluten molecule can initiate a response. If each amino acid that makes up gluten is represented as a single letter that very tiny part would be: SGQGSFQPSQQ. There are other sequences of amino acids that cause a reaction in gluten sensitive individuals, but the point is, as tiny as this fragment is with respect to the entire gluten protein, it is still HUGE with respect to the size of ethanol (the stuff you are drinking).
    What is Alcohol?
    The alcohol you drink is ethanol. Ethanol is smaller than the size of...