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Kayla Nichole

Smoking With Celiac Disease

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I have had Celiac Disease for 2 years and have been smoking regularly for about 4 months. It took a long time to find out what was wrong with me and for me to finally get on a Gluten free diet. I started with no gluten about a year ago but kept learning new things that had it.. so I have been TOTALLY gluten-free for only about 6 months. I started smoking again (I did before I even got sick) about 2 months into the totally gluten-free diet, I was really better.. no more stumach aches and I had normal bowel movements. I hadn't felt so good in years. The problem is this, I am under 18 and when my mother found out I was smoking again she made me quit. I stoped not too long ago and now I am very constipated, I always feel sick (because of the lack of bowel movements) and I told my mother I thought it was because she made me quit smoking. She knows nothing about Celiac Disease or smoking and is convinced that smoke does not affect bowel movements, but I of corse know different. My question is this. Does smoking help regulate your bowel movements? or affect them at all. I am not trying to prove my mom wrong to get her to let me smoke, I want to prove her wrong to show her why I am messed up now.

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Yes, smoking does affect your bowel movements. It also apparently has a protective effect on the gut in terms of celiac (according to some studies)...but that effect is completely negated by the fact that it can cause so many cancers and other health issues.

Once you have quit for a long enough time, your bowels should no longer need the help of cigarettes. You could always take up drinking coffee instead...it helps bowel movements too. :)

I quit smoking 10 years ago (before I had kids) and am very happy I did...now I can't even stand being around smoke!

Michelle

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I have had Celiac Disease for 2 years and have been smoking regularly for about 4 months. It took a long time to find out what was wrong with me and for me to finally get on a Gluten free diet. I started with no gluten about a year ago but kept learning new things that had it.. so I have been TOTALLY gluten-free for only about 6 months. I started smoking again (I did before I even got sick) about 2 months into the totally gluten-free diet, I was really better.. no more stumach aches and I had normal bowel movements. I hadn't felt so good in years. The problem is this, I am under 18 and when my mother found out I was smoking again she made me quit. I stoped not too long ago and now I am very constipated, I always feel sick (because of the lack of bowel movements) and I told my mother I thought it was because she made me quit smoking. She knows nothing about Celiac Disease or smoking and is convinced that smoke does not affect bowel movements, but I of corse know different. My question is this. Does smoking help regulate your bowel movements? or affect them at all. I am not trying to prove my mom wrong to get her to let me smoke, I want to prove her wrong to show her why I am messed up now.

Congratulations on quitting smoking! It's the best thing for your health. At first you can get constipated, but it will regulate it's self. Try taking a stool softener.


allergy to wheat/oats, milk, eggs, corn, yeast, tree nuts, turkey, seeds, mold, dust, dander, pollens, soy and other legumes

Son: allergy to milk, avoiding nuts, eggs, fish

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Yep, there have been a couple studies suggesting that some people, who don't know they have celiac disease, 'self-medicate' with cigarettes. The mechanism isn't known, though.

But the downside of cigarettes - the numerous carcinogenic chemicals (especially the added ones) as well as the aging effects - outweight the bowel effects that can be gotten from other things. (Senna, additional fiber, and exercise can all help constipation.)


Tiffany aka "Have I Mentioned Chocolate Lately?"

Inconclusive Blood Tests, Positive Dietary Results, No Endoscopy

G.F. - September 2003; C.F. - July 2004

Hiker, Yoga Teacher, Engineer, Painter, Be-er of Me

Bellevue, WA

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I have had Celiac Disease for 2 years and have been smoking regularly for about 4 months. It took a long time to find out what was wrong with me and for me to finally get on a Gluten free diet. I started with no gluten about a year ago but kept learning new things that had it.. so I have been TOTALLY gluten-free for only about 6 months. I started smoking again (I did before I even got sick) about 2 months into the totally gluten-free diet, I was really better.. no more stumach aches and I had normal bowel movements. I hadn't felt so good in years. The problem is this, I am under 18 and when my mother found out I was smoking again she made me quit. I stoped not too long ago and now I am very constipated, I always feel sick (because of the lack of bowel movements) and I told my mother I thought it was because she made me quit smoking. She knows nothing about Celiac Disease or smoking and is convinced that smoke does not affect bowel movements, but I of corse know different. My question is this. Does smoking help regulate your bowel movements? or affect them at all. I am not trying to prove my mom wrong to get her to let me smoke, I want to prove her wrong to show her why I am messed up now.

I smoked about ten years back (around your age) and yes, it often sent me off to the bathroom after only a few puffs.


Gluten Free...negative blood results...absolutely positive diet results.

Dairy Free...absolutely positive diet results.

Egg Free...there goes another one...absolutely positive diet results.

Allergic to Codeine.

"Life is like a box of chocolates...you never know which ones may have gluten in them:)"

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