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ciavyn

Relief

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I was just reading posts about a frustrating holiday meal, inconsiderate family members choosing restaurants, and other annoying elements of the gluten free lifestyle. While always having to prepare food myself and call ahead to restaurants can absolutely stink, overall, I find myself having a fascinating response to this lifestyle change: relief. I no longer have to eat food and wonder about what is in it that might make me sick, I don't have the option to eat at fatty, high-calorie restaurants, which is helpful to my diet, and I don't have to eat foods cooked by others...because I'm a pretty decent cook, eating foods made by others is usually unpleasant for me (I'm from the Southeast, but I live in the Northeast - and something about how people make food here is just not enjoyable for the most part).

Anyone else finding this viewpoint? Or is it still too frustrating to make it worth it?


Gluten free: Nov. 2009

Peanut and dairy free: Dec. 2009

Rediscovered dairy: March 2010 (in small quantities)

Peanuts added back: June 2010 (in small quantities)

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I agree with you. I'd rather cook myself now. I loved going out to eat. Could go out to eat everyday, for every meal. And I'm a real foodie at heart. Have loved food since I was a young child. At 5 yrs old, lobster, artichokes and avocados were my favorite foods, not burgers or fries.

When I went gluten free I did decide I would learn how to make my favorite meals gluten free. I think a lot of it has to do with attitude and where a person is in the grieving process of giving up gluten. I think going gluten free is harder than quiting smoking, drugs or alcohol. Gluten is everywhere so is harder to avoid. Smoking, drugs and alcohol are acceptable things to give up for your health. Bread, pasta and food that is "good for you and healthy" is not.

There isn't a patch or a pill we can take, we do not have hospital coverage for 6 weeks of gluten withdrawal therapy and it's not understood by our doctors. This is something that only the strong and determined will survive, mainly on their own.

At least we have our therapy group here.


1960s-had symptoms-could have been before but don't remember

1970s-told had colitis or nervous stomach-was given phenobarbital, felt great but still had symptoms

Me, dd and ds diagnosed with Lactose Intolerance

2000-osteopenia

2001-had stroke because of medications I was given

June 2003-saw Chiropractor who specialized in nutrition: Celiac Disease not Lactose Intolerance, went gluten free with once in awhile cheating, off soy and dairy for about 6 months

June 2003-found excellent doctor for fibromyalgia (who has found out she has Celiac Disease)

May 2006-went gluten free with NO cheating-excellent! Made all the difference in the world

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I too enjoy cooking, & have many food intolerance cookbooks to choose from.

However, with working full-time, raising a young child, & doing almost all of the housework too (I'm married, but not to a partner who does things equally), I have been finding meal planning & preparation more of a stresser than an enjoyment. It's now become a chore, & that's overwhelming in & of itself.

I do miss eating out at restaurants, though know I never will do so safely again.

Sometimes however, there is no option, such as events with work, family celebrations, or when traveling. Those are the situations where I feel stressed & unsure what to do.


Diagnosed Fibromyalgia & osteoarthritis in multiple joints 12/06

Diagnosed gluten intolerant through dietary trials 8/07

Enterolab positive for gluten, casein, soy, egg

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 1,1 (Subtype 6,6)

Gluten free 8/10/07

Casein free 8/27/07

Soy & egg free 9/8/07

Eggs back again (whoo hoo!) 11/08

Diagnosed chronic fatigue syndrome 12/09

Starting various supplements/vitamins in hopes of feeling better!

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Yeah, now try and imagine a life without avacados and artichokes. Sorry, I couldn't resist. That's my reality. Both make me ill as do most nightshades, sunflower and many things in the daisy family as well as certain fish and seafoods high in mercury.

If gluten were my only issue life would be so simple and so lovely. I've been gluten-free since 06. Watching the Food Network is still an exercise in misery most days. I was a foodie but with allergies and intolerances it gets to the point where the options are limited.

I would literally kill to be able to walk into any restaurant and have someone else make a safe meal for me. My point is that while we may share the label Celiac, not all of us face the same challenges. What is easy for one person will be very hard for another in ways you couldn't imagine.

I agree with you. I'd rather cook myself now. I loved going out to eat. Could go out to eat everyday, for every meal. And I'm a real foodie at heart. Have loved food since I was a young child. At 5 yrs old, lobster, artichokes and avocados were my favorite foods, not burgers or fries.

When I went gluten free I did decide I would learn how to make my favorite meals gluten free. I think a lot of it has to do with attitude and where a person is in the grieving process of giving up gluten. I think going gluten free is harder than quiting smoking, drugs or alcohol. Gluten is everywhere so is harder to avoid. Smoking, drugs and alcohol are acceptable things to give up for your health. Bread, pasta and food that is "good for you and healthy" is not.

There isn't a patch or a pill we can take, we do not have hospital coverage for 6 weeks of gluten withdrawal therapy and it's not understood by our doctors. This is something that only the strong and determined will survive, mainly on their own.

At least we have our therapy group here.


"My mother always told me, it's okay to play with a man's mind

as long as you put it back where you got it when you're done with it."

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I too enjoy cooking, & have many food intolerance cookbooks to choose from.

However, with working full-time, raising a young child, & doing almost all of the housework too (I'm married, but not to a partner who does things equally), I have been finding meal planning & preparation more of a stresser than an enjoyment. It's now become a chore, & that's overwhelming in & of itself.

I do miss eating out at restaurants, though know I never will do so safely again.

Sometimes however, there is no option, such as events with work, family celebrations, or when traveling. Those are the situations where I feel stressed & unsure what to do.

Horsegirl - that is incredibly frustrating. Something to consider: Since you can't get away from cooking, is there a way to make it more fun so you enjoy it? Do you have any close friends who would keep you company and maybe help prepare ingredients? My girlfriend loves to sit in my kitchen while I cook, and then chat and do our nails in between cookie batches and soup prep. It takes me about 4-5 hours to prepare food for the week every Sunday, and that's for two of us, and two part-time kiddos. I also try to fit in one new dish a week, to keep things spiced up.

I don't know if that helps, but know my thoughts are with you on that, because that stinks.


Gluten free: Nov. 2009

Peanut and dairy free: Dec. 2009

Rediscovered dairy: March 2010 (in small quantities)

Peanuts added back: June 2010 (in small quantities)

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Thanks, ciavyn. I like your idea. I also appreciate the support!


Diagnosed Fibromyalgia & osteoarthritis in multiple joints 12/06

Diagnosed gluten intolerant through dietary trials 8/07

Enterolab positive for gluten, casein, soy, egg

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 1,1 (Subtype 6,6)

Gluten free 8/10/07

Casein free 8/27/07

Soy & egg free 9/8/07

Eggs back again (whoo hoo!) 11/08

Diagnosed chronic fatigue syndrome 12/09

Starting various supplements/vitamins in hopes of feeling better!

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Thanks, ciavyn. I like your idea. I also appreciate the support!

Anytime - and good luck!


Gluten free: Nov. 2009

Peanut and dairy free: Dec. 2009

Rediscovered dairy: March 2010 (in small quantities)

Peanuts added back: June 2010 (in small quantities)

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