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No Gluten, Dairy, Soy, Yeast, Eggs, Nightshades...

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I'm 23 and haven't really felt "healthy" since childhood. And until a week ago, I had never heard of Celiac Disease. I went to my doctor last week (despite no health insurance) because the awful GI symptoms I've had for years had gotten worse within the past three months. I was scared something serious was wrong. I listed my symptoms and my diet, she did a brief examination, and then she told me the first thing to try was to go on a gluten-free and dairy-free diet for two weeks and see how I do.

That seemed like no problem, because food is just business to me. I don't feel very attached to any certain foods. In fact I removed almost all carbohydrates from my diet starting a year ago, assuming that's what was making me feel so sick all the time (the occasional pizza and pasta dinners always made me feel the worst). I didn't miss those dishes, or the cereal and sandwiches I used to live on; I was just happy to be feeling a little better than before. Looking back, I reintroduced whole grain wheat bread into my diet a few months ago, and that's probably when the GI symptoms worsened.

So, I was more than willing to try this gluten-free diet and started researching which foods I could eat as soon as I got to my computer. To my surprise, every site I visited for gluten-free diet info mentioned something called "Celiac Disease." And I realized that's what my doctor suspected I might have. I started researching that instead.

It wasn't long before I found this site, and for six days straight I have been obsessively reading these forums, cramming every bit of knowledge into my head as it could hold. I was amazed every single day by what I found. After a lot of decision-making processes based on what I've been reading, I finally settled on getting tested through Enterolab (just ordered my kit yesterday), and starting the diet.

I've read that besides just gluten, people commonly have reactions to other foods as well. I've cut way back on dairy the last few days and already see improvement (I used to drink mostly milk), so I know that needs to go. But when I go completely gluten-free and dairy-free in the very near future, I would also like to cut out soy, yeast, eggs, and nightshades. My reasoning being that I want to know for certain whether or not this diet is the solution to my problems. I don't want other possible food sensitivities getting in the way of me seeing clear-cut results. I'll probably start reintroducing them one at a time a little later on.

And here's where I need help. I'm all for doing my own homework, but I have to admit, I am pretty overwhelmed. I feel like I've stuffed a year's worth of new information into the past six days. I really need some answers that I don't have to search and search for. Please help me do this right!

Again, here is what I'm cutting out of my diet:

Gluten

Dairy (casein)

Soy

Yeast

Eggs

Nightshades

I've also decided not to try the commercial "gluten-free" versions of foods until later on. I know they aren't as well regulated at they could be. I'm not sure which ones to trust just yet so I'd rather be safe.

So here are my questions. Could anyone give me a list of any foods that are safe for me to eat? And some advice on getting as balanced nutrition as possible under the circumstances? I know there will be vitamin/mineral deficiencies because I've narrowed my allowable foods down to very little. I'd also like recommendations on what vitamins to take to cover the deficiencies.

I can't wait to start this diet and hopefully feel better than I have in years. I never thought I'd be hoping to be diagnosed with a disease... but if I find out this is my problem, then I will finally have the answer to it! This forum has already helped me so much. Thanks to everyone who has contributed.

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I'm 23 and haven't really felt "healthy" since childhood. And until a week ago, I had never heard of Celiac Disease. I went to my doctor last week (despite no health insurance) because the awful GI symptoms I've had for years had gotten worse within the past three months. I was scared something serious was wrong. I listed my symptoms and my diet, she did a brief examination, and then she told me the first thing to try was to go on a gluten-free and dairy-free diet for two weeks and see how I do.

That seemed like no problem, because food is just business to me. I don't feel very attached to any certain foods. In fact I removed almost all carbohydrates from my diet starting a year ago, assuming that's what was making me feel so sick all the time (the occasional pizza and pasta dinners always made me feel the worst). I didn't miss those dishes, or the cereal and sandwiches I used to live on; I was just happy to be feeling a little better than before. Looking back, I reintroduced whole grain wheat bread into my diet a few months ago, and that's probably when the GI symptoms worsened.

So, I was more than willing to try this gluten-free diet and started researching which foods I could eat as soon as I got to my computer. To my surprise, every site I visited for gluten-free diet info mentioned something called "Celiac Disease." And I realized that's what my doctor suspected I might have. I started researching that instead.

It wasn't long before I found this site, and for six days straight I have been obsessively reading these forums, cramming every bit of knowledge into my head as it could hold. I was amazed every single day by what I found. After a lot of decision-making processes based on what I've been reading, I finally settled on getting tested through Enterolab (just ordered my kit yesterday), and starting the diet.

I've read that besides just gluten, people commonly have reactions to other foods as well. I've cut way back on dairy the last few days and already see improvement (I used to drink mostly milk), so I know that needs to go. But when I go completely gluten-free and dairy-free in the very near future, I would also like to cut out soy, yeast, eggs, and nightshades. My reasoning being that I want to know for certain whether or not this diet is the solution to my problems. I don't want other possible food sensitivities getting in the way of me seeing clear-cut results. I'll probably start reintroducing them one at a time a little later on.

And here's where I need help. I'm all for doing my own homework, but I have to admit, I am pretty overwhelmed. I feel like I've stuffed a year's worth of new information into the past six days. I really need some answers that I don't have to search and search for. Please help me do this right!

Again, here is what I'm cutting out of my diet:

Gluten

Dairy (casein)

Soy

Yeast

Eggs

Nightshades

I've also decided not to try the commercial "gluten-free" versions of foods until later on. I know they aren't as well regulated at they could be. I'm not sure which ones to trust just yet so I'd rather be safe.

So here are my questions. Could anyone give me a list of any foods that are safe for me to eat? And some advice on getting as balanced nutrition as possible under the circumstances? I know there will be vitamin/mineral deficiencies because I've narrowed my allowable foods down to very little. I'd also like recommendations on what vitamins to take to cover the deficiencies.

I can't wait to start this diet and hopefully feel better than I have in years. I never thought I'd be hoping to be diagnosed with a disease... but if I find out this is my problem, then I will finally have the answer to it! This forum has already helped me so much. Thanks to everyone who has contributed.

Congratulations on making the gluten free decision. Yours is a very reasoned approached because as you have noted, so many of us discover other intolerances when we eliminate gluten.

The whole foods approach is the best way to approach the diet anyway. Meat, fish, chicken, rice, fruits and vegetables. Some people also have problems with nuts so its best to leave those out at first too if you want to be pure about your elimination diet. No processed foods, no grains. This is the best way to let your intestines heal and enter the diet. Then after a few weeks you can add things back in one at a time every few days to see if you react to them. You can drink hemp or almond milk. Olive or grapeseed oil is good for cooking, also coconut oil. Use McCormick's spices (single ingredient). At first that is probably all you are going to need. Snack on vegetables and fruit (dried is okay like apricots, raisins, pineapple, etc.)

Basically, your rule is to shop the edge of the supermarket and forget about what's in the middle for a while. There's plenty of time for the rest later.

Good luck, and let us know how your Enterolab test turns out. :)

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Here is a list of the to 8 food allergens in the US. You have most of these in your avoid list already, so you are ahead of the game there.

Mayo Clinc top 8 allergens

Milk

Eggs

Peanuts

Tree nuts (such as almonds, cashews, walnuts)

Fish (such as bass, cod, flounder)

Shellfish (such as crab, lobster, shrimp)

Soy

Wheat

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Vitamins and supplements-check all labels for gluten!

a good multivitamin

B complex, or better yet sublingual b12

probiotics

digestive enzymes

That should be a good start!

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To answer the question, "What can I eat." I would make a menu. At the bottom of the page make lists, protiens, carbs, veggies, bevs, snacks. Then just fill in the blanks on the menu. This really helps us avoid last minute confusion and frustration. It saves money at the store as well! :)

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Some brands of supplements are better at labeling than others. I find NOW Foods and Source Naturals usually do a decent job labeling what's in a supplement, and what's not in it. Due to malabsorption, you may find (as many others do) that you need to take more than the recommended amounts of certain things, in order to absorb enough of them.

Don't forget to toss out any wooden spoons, cutting boards, or other wooden utensils, scratched non-stick pans, cast iron, or anything else that has surfaces to which gluten can cling. This includes many strainers and colanders. Smooth glass surfaces and smooth stainless steel surfaces generally clean up easily enough. If you ever wish to toast gluten-free breads, you'll need a new toaster.

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Okay, wow! Thanks good people!

I have been putting to use all of this advice. It really helped with the overwhelmed feelings to be given some answers all in one place. Though despite that, yesterday, I think I kind of... snapped. I thought I had been dealing with all this new stuff really well, but really, it just hadn't sunk in yet. When it got to the point of actually getting ready to make all the changes that day, the thought of having to rely only on myself at the stores using the info in my own brain to sort it all out correctly, that was too much. I was a crying wreck. And scared because I haven't been eating much the last few days for various reasons and have lost three pounds. My boyfriend Lloyd ended up dropping everything and helping me. He did research and read this topic, and we both made lists so that he could help me at the stores.

We live together and he decided to go gluten-free with me when I first told him I had to do it. Our other roommate (and our best friend) will probably do it too once she gets more research done. I didn't ask them to, they're just awesome that way. We all love each other a lot. For now though, I have my own gluten-free table just outside the kitchen where I'll do food preparation and keep all my kitchen things.

So, my new avoid list:

Gluten

Dairy (casein)

Soy

Yeast

Eggs

Nightshades

Peanuts and tree nuts

Fish and shellfish

Oats (forgot to mention)

And here are the non-foods I bought yesterday.

Some new cookware for myself, all metal or glass (no non-stick surfaces)

My own sponges and dish soap (I'm going to clean in the bathroom sink for now because the kitchen is probably completely covered with a thick film of gluten, lol. My stuff would get dirty instead of clean.)

My own paper towels, ziploc bags, cling wrap, aluminum foil

My own cutting boards

Airtight storage containers for putting all my fridge and freezer foods into

A larger storage bin for all other foods and things that need to be kept gluten-free

New personal hygiene products (my shampoo and moisturizer both had PICTURES of wheat on them even! Go figure.)

And the foods I got (all fresh, not packaged). We went through the whole fruit/vegetable/meat sections and Lloyd would explain which things had which nutrients, how much I should get of them, how they can be prepared, etc. I know a little about nutrition, but food has always been based mostly on convenience for me. My meals were simple and quick, usually no cooking involved. Lloyd has a lot of experience cooking though. I got:

Apples, bananas, nectarines, oranges, grapes, pear, avocado

Spinach, carrots, cucumber, broccoli, green beans, asparagus

Chicken, lean beef, bacon, pork chop

Brown rice

Extra virgin olive oil

Some spices

jugs of water (our Brita pitcher is probably contaminated)

I couldn't find the vitamins I needed yet. We're going to Vitamin World today to get the multivitamin, sublingual B12, probiotics, and digestive enzymes. A couple questions:

Is there any specific type of probiotics that would be best?

And, any recommendation of a brand of multivitamin that excludes the things in my avoid list? Not sure if employees would know, so it would save us some searching to know beforehand.

I still have to work on the menu idea too. I'm gonna need a lot of Lloyd-help there. I need to learn how to cook, period. And go figure that he's about to take a 5-day trip to visit his family thousands of miles away tomorrow. I will probably live only because cell phone calls to each other are free. :P

Oh, and would it be okay to still share things like metal utensils and non-plastic dinnerware (that gluten, etc. has touched) if it has gone through the dishwasher?

I think that's everything. So, does it sounds like this is a good start? Anything I should change or add or remove? Thanks good people, this forum is improving my life.

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I think that's everything. So, does it sounds like this is a good start? Anything I should change or add or remove? Thanks good people, this forum is improving my life.

It does sound like a good start. There is no need to do any fancy cooking at first. Start simple and plain. Follow the package directions for the rice and make sure it doesn't boil dry. Vegetables can be steamed in the microwave under some plastic wrap with a hole poked in it and a little bit of water added to the bottom of the bowl. Meats can be pan sauteed in a little bit of olive oil over a medium heat. There is no need to make a big production out of anything.

Make sure you have something for breakfast. Maybe get some of the hemp milk and make a fruit smoothie (you can buy things like frozen berries to add to your bananas). You will do just fine :D

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I think there are forums or websites for diets like that, and I ahve seen other postings by other people like that. Should even be some food blogs out there.

maybe ask in the other food intolerances folder here, or do a search with the search facility here?

Maybe there is more here: http://www.plantpoisonsandrottenstuff.info/content/elimination-diet.aspx

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