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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   04/24/2018

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What is Celiac Disease and the Gluten-Free Diet? What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes

GFinDC

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  1. Hi, The endoscopy is not a big problem. They usually put the person out during the endoscopy. They put a 5 foot long, thin tube down the throat and a little way into the small intestine. The tube (endoscope) can take tiny bits of the lining of the small intestine for the biopsy. He shouldn't feel anything except he may have a slightly sore throat the next day. The endoscope usually has a camera so the Dr. can take pictures inside. There are several blood antibody tests. The Dr. should do the full celiac disease antibody panel. It includes deamidated IgA and deamidated IgG and EMA, plus total IgA. He should keep eating at least some gluten (wheat, rye, or barley) every day until all the testing is done.
  2. Hi dunnie, Celiac damage can impair our gut's ability to absorb nutrients. Nice things like vitamins, minerals, fats and sugars may not get absorbed well. Our bodies tend to work better when it gets the nutrients it needs. Without those neato things our bodies cells can't work well and heal themselves. We may be tired since our cells are starving for nutrients, even though we eat lots of food. Going gluten-free is a bit of a challenge, but the rewards for a person with celiac are great. Our guts can begin to heal. They can begin to absorb the nutrients we need again. The immune system can settle down and attack other things besides our bodies. These are not overnight changes though. It can take months for a person to recover from celiac damage. The immune system doesn't stop attacking instantly. But once it does and your gut is working right again, you may find you are feeling much, much better than you are used to feeling.
  3. Hi dunnie, Celiac damage can impair our gut's ability to absorb nutrients. Nice things like vitamins, minerals, fats and sugars may not get absorbed well. Our bodies tend to work better when it gets the nutrients it needs. Without those neato things our bodies cells can't work well and heal themselves. We may be tired since our cells are starving for nutrients, even though we eat lots of food. Going gluten-free is a bit of a challenge, but the rewards for a person with celiac are great. Our guts can begin to heal. They can begin to absorb the nutrients we need again. The immune system can settle down and attack other things besides our bodies. These are not overnight changes though. It can take months for a person to recover from celiac damage. The immune system doesn't stop attacking instantly. But once it does and your gut is working right again, you may find you are feeling much, much better than you are used to feeling.
  4. Hi Gary, If you are low on iron it can take months to build up more red blood cells and hemaglobin. I think they say iron is better absorbed by taking some vitamin C with it also. They sometimes say to eat spinach if you have low iron. But it is probably more helpful to use a cast iron cooking skillet. https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/study-shows-iron-supplementation-after-blood-donation-shortens-hemoglobin-recovery-time Researchers separated the blood donors into two groups based on their iron levels: a lower iron and a higher iron group. Half of each group was randomized to take one tablet of ferrous gluconate (38 mg of low dose iron) daily for 24 weeks following their blood donation. Hemoglobin and iron levels were measured seven times during the study. Compared to donors who did not take iron, the donors taking iron supplements returned to pre-donation hemoglobin levels faster in both the lower iron (five weeks versus 23 weeks) and higher iron groups (four weeks versus 11 weeks). Similarly, donors taking iron supplements recovered lost iron more rapidly than those not receiving supplements (11 weeks versus more than 24 weeks). Without iron supplementation, two thirds of the donors did not recover the iron lost from donating blood after 24 weeks.
  5. Hi, It could be an allergy to wheat. Or it could be the beginning stages of DH (dermatitis herpetiformis), a condition associated with celiac disease. That's just a guess though. You should probably get an allergy test right away. Allergies are nothing to ignore, as they can suddenly start getting much worse. Sometimes they become life-threatening suddenly. Better safe than sorry.
  6. SO OVER eating gluten free!

    Hi Jainney, I posted some links to threads on meal ideas in this thread on 10-Nov-2012. I am surprised you missed it! Anyhow, there are threads on breakfast ideas which are often quick and easy meals. Plus, other meal threads. They might give you some ideas.
  7. Very believeable Elijah! Is your back yard near a brook? Did they bring you hot dogs too? 1 Kings 17 reference https://www.kingjamesbibleonline.org/1-Kings-Chapter-17/ 3Get thee hence, and turn thee eastward, and hide thyself by the brook Cherith, that is before Jordan. 4And it shall be, that thou shalt drink of the brook; and I have commanded the ravens to feed thee there. 5So he went and did according unto the word of the LORD: for he went and dwelt by the brook Cherith, that isbefore Jordan. 6And the ravens brought him bread and flesh in the morning, and bread and flesh in the evening; and he drank of the brook. 7And it came to pass after a while, that the brook dried up, because there had been no rain in the land. 8And the word of the LORD came unto him, saying, 9Arise, get thee to Zarephath, which belongeth to Zidon, and dwell there: behold, I have commanded a widow woman there to sustain thee.
  8. Pain management

    Agree, but not having gluten doesn't mean it can't cause a reaction. Some of us have developed reactions to non-gluten foods like eggs, tomatoes, corn, nightshades etc. OP never claimed ketchup has gluten, just that it caused her daughter pain.
  9. Hi P.d, Some people never show up on the blood tests. The blood testing is good but not perfect. So you may still have celiac disease but not show it in your bloodstream yet. There is another condition called NCGS (non-celiac gluten sensitivity) that can also cause symptoms when eating gluten. But there are no tests for it yet. Actually, NCGS is more common than celiac disease. NCGS may be linked to FODMAPs in foods. People with DH (dermatitis herpetiformis and those with gluten ataxia also may test negative but still have celiac disease. Celiac testing just needs some improvement IMHO. But, you can try the gluten-free diet without a doctor's suggestion. If you feel better in a few weeks that is a good reason to stay on the gluten-free diet. It doesn't matter what a test says, it matters how you feel. Once you start the gluten-free diet it may take several months or more to get better. Some things take time to heal.
  10. A babie's body need's protein, minerals, vitamins and energy to grow and thrive. A growing body needs these things in much higher percentages than an adult. So an adult diet is not appropriate for an infant. You as an adult may do wonderfully on a totally vegan diet but your infant needs lots of quality protein and fats to build muscle and bone and brain. Our brains are mostly composed of fats and nerve cells. Please consider carefully before restricting your infants diet to a diet lacking these critically needed nutrients. Babies are not the same as adults and need a better diet really. I think you understand that and that is why you asked your question. Good for you! There is so much to learn when becoming a parent.
  11. Hi Shad, There is a medical test for lactose intolerance. Seems like there is one other food intolerance test but I forget what it is now. But basically, the best test is our own bodies' response. People do elimination diets to determine what foods cause them problems. Myself I have done several elimination diets over the years, as food intolerances can change over time. The first one I did I ate nothing but apples with salt on them for a few days. I had not been eating salt for 5 years at that point. I quickly learned I had an iodine deficiency because I got an energy boost after eating the apples with iodized salt. That surprised me but it shouldn't have as not eating salt means you have to get your iodine elsewhere. Duh! A good elimination diet is to pick out 5 simple foods that you think will not cause digestion problems. Safe foods. An example might be chicken, oranges, rice, broccoli and peas. Eat only those foods for a week or two. If you are not reacting to those foods then you should start to feel better. It can be a little boring I know. Anyhow, if everything is improved and your digestion has settled down, try adding one new food every 3 days. If things haven't improved, one of the first 5 foods may be a problem. Remember, everything counts, including spices, drinks, sauces, etc. Our bodies don't discriminate when it comes to picking out a food to target. So we can develop an intolerance to any food. But anecdotally I'd say it is usually foods we eat a lot of that cause problems.
  12. Hi Shad, We don't always get clear cut answers with celiac disease. That's part of why celiac is so often mis-diagnosed as some other condition. It can take years to get a celiac disease diagnosis. Or sometimes it is very quick too. But that is usually after years of a person having the condition and suffering from many symptoms. Most people with celiac disease in the USA are not diagnosed today. If you feel better not eating gluten there has to be a reason for that. It could be celiac in the early stages, or it could be NCGS (non-celiac gluten sensitivity). Either way the treatment is the same, avoid gluten in your diet. I suggest you write down the symptoms you were having and how they made you feel. Plus how things have improved sine going gluten-free. Keep that as a reminder for later when you might begin to have doubts. Sometimes it is helpful to do a food diary and record everything we eat and drink and the results. Sometimes a pattern will emerge. To start the gluten-free diet, please take a look at the newbie 101 thread in the coping with section. It has some good tips. Staying with whole foods (nuts. meats, veggies, fruits) and no dairy for a couple months is good. No oats for a while either. There are no tests for NCGS yet. It may be related to FODMAPs in the diet though.
  13. Sounds like an allergic reaction to me. Allergies can develop at any time in life. They can also get suddenly worse at any point. Stronger reactions that is. I suggest you try some other diary product in just a tiny amount and see if you react. You may have to give up all dairy. A trip to the allergist might be a good idea.
  14. Quiting gluten

    In six months you'll probably feel better, if you stick to a totally gluten-free diet and avoid processed foods. There are plenty of gluten-free beers available. There are also digestive enzymes that might help your digestion. Six months is not very long to feel better IMHO. Getting cancer of the gut or developing additional IA conditions by not following the gluten-free diet is not a fun thought. The chances of cancer are very low, but I don't know about the other AI conditions. Plenty of people on this forum have other AI conditions though. Most often it seems they occur after being undiagnosed with celiac and eating gluten for years IMHO. The damage to your gut is just part of what celiac can do to you. There are much more bothersome and difficult conditions that can occur if you don't stay gluten-free. I'd consider that worth staying gluten-free IMHO.
  15. Gluten free but still with DH?

    Hi Ron, If you are already gluten-free, the testing won't work. The antibodies need time to build up in the bloodstream, so the person being tested is supposed to eat gluten every day for 12 weeks prior to testing. They call that a gluten challenge. It doesn't matter though, you were already diagnosed by endoscopy and blood antibody testing. If you were tested for antibodies again today, they should not show up as positive because you have been off gluten a while. Unless you have been consistently eating gluten contaminated foods. Only 1 antibody test needs to be positive to have celiac disease. For DH they do a skin biopsy test. They take sample of clear skin from next to a lesion. DH is a form of celiac disease though, so there's not much point IMHO. Although your dermatologist might want to do the biopsy before prescribing medication. Don't go to just any doctor for celiac testing. Most people with celiac disease are undiagnosed still. That's because doctors don't do a good job diagnosing or recognizing celiac. It can be very helpful to go to a doctor that other celiacs in your area trust. So a web search for a celiac support groups in your area might find you a local group who can recommend a doctor.