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sfsassy

Gluten Free Bread Machine

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I hope this is the correct place to post this.

But I wanted to start making my gluten free breads at home and wanted opinions on the best bread machine on the market with a gluten free cycle.

Anyone have one they love/hate? Is it worth the investment?

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I just went out and got a regular bread machine when I was first diagnosed. It worked fine for gluten free bread. I also spent a fortune on all these different flours, egg replacers etc. I only used mine a few times. Most of the flours went in the garbage a few months later.

For me, as one person, it has been more cost effective to simply buy gluten-free bread. I get either Kinnickinnick or Grainless Baker. I personally like the Grainless baker the best. They both come frozen and I take half the loaf and put it into a plastic bag and let it thaw in the fridge. I use it within a week and haven't had any issues with mold. Most of our bread is best when it is microwaved or toasted before we use it.

If you have a family that is eating gluten free making it may be less costly for you though and the smell of baking bread is delightful.


Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying

"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)

Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002

Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis

All bold resoved or went into remission in time with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002

 Gene Test Aug 2007

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

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I just went out and got a regular bread machine when I was first diagnosed. It worked fine for gluten free bread. I also spent a fortune on all these different flours, egg replacers etc. I only used mine a few times. Most of the flours went in the garbage a few months later.

For me, as one person, it has been more cost effective to simply buy gluten-free bread. I get either Kinnickinnick or Grainless Baker. I personally like the Grainless baker the best. They both come frozen and I take half the loaf and put it into a plastic bag and let it thaw in the fridge. I use it within a week and haven't had any issues with mold. Most of our bread is best when it is microwaved or toasted before we use it.

If you have a family that is eating gluten free making it may be less costly for you though and the smell of baking bread is delightful.

I love baking, but I wonder if it's just easier to buy what I need. We have all the good stores here to get my bread. But I like the idea of making/baking again.

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I love baking, but I wonder if it's just easier to buy what I need. We have all the good stores here to get my bread. But I like the idea of making/baking again.

If you enjoy baking you could try just using regular bread pans and the oven for a bit. Then if you really enjoy the bread and eat it often you could go and get the bread machine. The convience of a bread machine is that it cuts out the kneading step and not all our breads need to be kneaded.


Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying

"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)

Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002

Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis

All bold resoved or went into remission in time with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002

 Gene Test Aug 2007

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

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