Jump to content
  • Sign Up
0
salexander421

Can Non Celiac Gluten Intolerance Cause Malabsorption?

Rate this topic

Recommended Posts

Does non celiac gluten intolerance cause malabsorption? Can anyone point me in the direction of any literature on the subject?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Does non celiac gluten intolerance cause malabsorption? Can anyone point me in the direction of any literature on the subject?

Here's one reference on the subject, although not a medical journal link: http://www.examiner.com/gluten-free-food-in-denver/how-do-you-know-if-gluten-is-a-problem-for-you?render=print

I don't think much medical research has actually been done on this subject because it would take away the one way that doctors can make money out of celiac disease - the biopsy :P I don't think they really want to know if mere gluten intolerance can cause malabsorption.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Does non celiac gluten intolerance cause malabsorption? Can anyone point me in the direction of any literature on the subject?

I can't help with any research, but I can say the answer is a big yes for me.

I had positive blood work and negative biopsy, and had very difficult to manage iron, B12 and D deficiencies. I had ongoing regular injections for iron and B12 both before and after going gluten free. It probably averages out to 1 injection a month for about 3 years for both iron and B12. My levels would crash dramatically the few times I was glutened early into the gluten-free diet, though I have no idea of the mechanism. It was so bad that I was investigated for Crohn's disease, luckily it was clear.

I found that my deficiencies didn't start to resolve until more than 18 months gluten free. About 8 months ago I started an elimination diet which incorporated the FODMAP diet, and this dramatically improved my digestion. I have only had a couple of injections in the last 6 months, and my iron and b12 levels are steady at a higher level than I ever recorded before, well into the normal range. My D deficiency has also resolved of its own accord. So for me, the gluten damage wrecked my system, and it has taken a lot to recover my ability to absorb nutrients. All this without a positive biopsy!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can't help with any research, but I can say the answer is a big yes for me.

I had positive blood work and negative biopsy, and had very difficult to manage iron, B12 and D deficiencies. I had ongoing regular injections for iron and B12 both before and after going gluten free. It probably averages out to 1 injection a month for about 3 years for both iron and B12. My levels would crash dramatically the few times I was glutened early into the gluten-free diet, though I have no idea of the mechanism. It was so bad that I was investigated for Crohn's disease, luckily it was clear.

I found that my deficiencies didn't start to resolve until more than 18 months gluten free. About 8 months ago I started an elimination diet which incorporated the FODMAP diet, and this dramatically improved my digestion. I have only had a couple of injections in the last 6 months, and my iron and b12 levels are steady at a higher level than I ever recorded before, well into the normal range. My D deficiency has also resolved of its own accord. So for me, the gluten damage wrecked my system, and it has taken a lot to recover my ability to absorb nutrients. All this without a positive biopsy!

Occasionally absorptive issues can be caused by (and go hand in hand with) hypothyroidism, especially hashimotos. I don't want to wear out my welcome here, but you have all the standard malabsorptive issues that go along with hypothyroidism as well. Couldn't hurt to check. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
0

×