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October3

Threshold Of Acceptability

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I called Crest and Colgate to inquire about whether their toothpastes are gluten-free, because I have seen gluten-free toothpaste advertised and hadn't previously considered that there could be gluten in toothpaste. Crest said their toothpaste has no gluten. Colgate said they don't add gluten to their products but can't guarentee they ingredients weren't exposed to gluten prior to their arrival at the factory. They said if something travels past a wheat field during transit it could be "exposed" and so they make no promises about things like that.

It seemed to be a very strict standard and one that on the surface seems to me to be unnecessary. I guess my thought is I'm willing to take that risk for the ease and savings of using something more mainstream. But maybe this is an issue for people??? Is it worth it to buy the labeled Gluten Free thing, or is it simply labeling tricks? I just don't see how anyone could guarantee that something has never passed by a wheat field.

On the other hand, I know Mela leuca products are tested for gluten and they have a list on their website of things that have tested gluten-free. (Toothpaste, btw, didn't make the list) So maybe that is important?

Can someone advise me as to how strict one should be starting out on things like this?

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I called Crest and Colgate to inquire about whether their toothpastes are gluten-free, because I have seen gluten-free toothpaste advertised and hadn't previously considered that there could be gluten in toothpaste. Crest said their toothpaste has no gluten. Colgate said they don't add gluten to their products but can't guarentee they ingredients weren't exposed to gluten prior to their arrival at the factory. They said if something travels past a wheat field during transit it could be "exposed" and so they make no promises about things like that.

It seemed to be a very strict standard and one that on the surface seems to me to be unnecessary. I guess my thought is I'm willing to take that risk for the ease and savings of using something more mainstream. But maybe this is an issue for people??? Is it worth it to buy the labeled Gluten Free thing, or is it simply labeling tricks? I just don't see how anyone could guarantee that something has never passed by a wheat field.

On the other hand, I know Mela leuca products are tested for gluten and they have a list on their website of things that have tested gluten-free. (Toothpaste, btw, didn't make the list) So maybe that is important?

Can someone advise me as to how strict one should be starting out on things like this?

Those companies are just giving CYA statements. NO company can guarentee that anything is 100% gluten free. Although some things you can be more sure about than others, it is physically impossible to test for no gluten. The most sensitive test detects 5 PPM.

From an experience standpoint--I am very sensitive to cc and I have not had to worry wbout my toothpaste. I use Crest, Colgate and Aquafresh (whatever I can get free with a coupon).

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I totally agree with GlutenFreeManna. Not everything we use will have a gluten-free label slapped on it and the companies are being honest about not being able to guarantee gluten-free status of ingredients. So yes, CYA statements abound.

That said, I use Colgate toothpaste and have no problem with it.

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